Environmental Services News


Ramp from SE 17th to Powell westbound to close Monday

Traffic Advisory

May 6, 2016

Beginning Monday, May 9, sewer construction on Powell Boulevard will close SE 17th Avenue northbound at SE Haig Street. The work will close the northbound SE 17th Avenue ramp that merges onto SE Powell westbound. The ramp will remain closed all days and all hours for up to 50 days.

During the ramp closure, northbound traffic on SE 17th will detour to SE McLoughlin Boulevard. The ramp closure will not affect pedestrian and bicycle traffic or southbound traffic on SE 17th Avenue. Traffic will also continue to flow in both directions on SE Powell Boulevard throughout construction.

This work is part of the Lower Powell Green Street and Sewer Project to replace or repair 4,500 feet of 100-year-old sewers in poor condition. More information is available at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/LowerPowell.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Nighttime lane closures on Powell to prepare for closure of ramp from SE 17th northbound to SE Powell westbound

Traffic Advisory

May 4, 2016

Starting tonight (Wednesday, May 4), sewer construction preparation will close one lane of SE Powell Boulevard in each direction between SE 10th Avenue and SE 15th Avenue for three nights. The overnight lane closures will last from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

The lane closures this week will allow construction crews to prepare to close the northbound ramp from SE 17th Avenue to Powell Boulevard westbound beginning Monday, May 9. Sewer construction will close the ramp 24 hours a day for up to 50 days.

During the ramp closure, northbound traffic on SE 17th will detour to SE McLoughlin Boulevard. The ramp closure will not affect pedestrian and bicycle traffic or southbound traffic on SE 17th Avenue. Traffic will also continue to flow in both directions on SE Powell Boulevard throughout construction.

This work is part of the Lower Powell Green Street and Sewer Project to replace or repair 4,500 feet of 100-year-old sewers in poor condition. Go to www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/LowerPowell for more information.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Traffic restrictions on SE Hawthorne and SE 50th

Traffic Advisory

April 29, 2016

Sewer construction starting Monday, May 2, 2016 will restrict traffic to local access only on SE Hawthorne Boulevard from SE Cesar Chavez Boulevard to SE 50th Avenue, and on SE 50th from SE Hawthorne Boulevard to SE Division Street.

Traffic restrictions will be in place all hours and all days for up to three weeks. Flaggers will move local traffic through work zones in both directions using a single lane.

Construction will cause traffic delays. Motorists and bicyclists who don’t need local access should use alternate routes.

The work is part of the Hawthorne Green Street and Sewer Project to replace sewer pipes and construct green street planters to manage stormwater runoff.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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An Earth Day look at 20 years of bringing back native vegetation

News Release

April 22, 2016

This Earth Day, people and wildlife on the Columbia Slough can enjoy the successes of a program responsible for planting more than one million native trees and shrubs in Portland watersheds over the last 20 years. The Bureau of Environmental Services Watershed Revegetation Program manages natural area and riparian corridor restoration work that supports improvement to water quality and natural habitat functions in the Portland metropolitan area.

The program started work in the Columbia Slough watershed in February 1996. Since then, revegetation teams have planted over 1.3-million native tree and shrub seedlings and restored vegetation on over 1,100 acres of natural area and riparian corridor in the slough watershed.

The program worked so well along the Columbia Slough that Environmental Services expanded it to the Johnson Creek watershed in 2000. Today, the program works on restoration projects all around Portland, but reforestation of the slough’s riparian corridors has always been the cornerstone of its work.

People who canoe the slough today are likely to enjoy dense stands of native trees and shrubs on both banks. But 20 years ago, the view was more likely to be industrial buildings and dense stands of invasive blackberries growing out of control.

near the St. Johns landfill 1997  near the St. Johns landfill 2013
A slough bank near the St. Johns landfill in 1997 (left) and in 2013 (right)

The change in landscape along the slough is dramatic in many places because of the program and the support and cooperation of many landowners and project partners including Multnomah County Drainage District, Portland Parks & Recreation, Metro and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council.

Through the Watershed Revegetation Program, Environmental Services forms partnerships with public and private landowners to restore degraded stream bank and upland areas. The restoration work improves water quality, controls erosion, reduces stormwater pollution, aids in long-term salmon recovery, and enhances wildlife habitat.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328,

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Maintenance crews stop a sewage release to a Fanno Creek tributary in southwest Portland

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory Update
(this is not a combined sewer overflow [CSO] advisory)

April 6, 2016

Work crews today successfully stopped sewage flowing from a broken pipe in a steep ravine near SW Carolina Street and SW 32nd Avenue. Field crews investigating sewer odors discovered the leak on Monday.

https://goo.gl/maps/j4ohu1Tiqsv

Because the area is too steep for machinery, maintenance crews worked by hand to expose the broken pipe and stop the leak. They made temporary repairs while engineers design permanent repairs.

Sewage from the broken pipe flowed into an unnamed tributary that joins Fanno Creek near SW 30th and Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, about four blocks from the point of the sewage release. The public should avoid contact with Fanno Creek in that area through this Friday afternoon.

The City of Portland treats an average of 70 million gallons of wastewater each day. Over one-third of Portland’s more than 2,500 miles of sewer pipes are over 80 years old. Pipes that fail or become blocked with grease, tree roots and debris can cause sewage overflows. The sewage release in southwest Portland is not related to Portland’s combined sewer overflow control system.

For more information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Sewage release to Fanno Creek tributary in southwest Portland

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory

(this is not a combined sewer overflow [CSO] advisory)

April 4, 2016

Maintenance crews are working to stop a sewage release to a small tributary of Fanno Creek. Field crews investigating odor complaints today discovered sewage flowing from broken pipe into the unnamed tributary.

Crews discovered the sewage release near the intersection of SW Carolina Street and SW 32nd Avenue.

https://goo.gl/maps/j4ohu1Tiqsv

Maintenance crews are unable to estimate how much sewage has been released or how long it will take to make repairs and stop the release. The City of Portland treats an average of 70 million gallons of wastewater each day.

The tributary flows into Fanno Creek near SW 30th and Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, about four blocks from the point of the sewage release. The public should avoid contact with Fanno Creek in that area until the leak is repaired.

Over one-third of Portland’s more than 2,500 miles of sewer pipes are over 80 years old. Pipes that fail or become blocked with grease, tree roots and debris can cause sewage overflows. The sewage release discovered today is not related to Portland’s combined sewer overflow control system.

For more information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Lane closed at NE Holman and 112th

Traffic Advisory

April 4, 2016

Sewer repairs have closed the eastbound lane of NE Holman Street at NE 112th Avenue. Flaggers are directing traffic around the work zone 24 hours a day until repairs are complete. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays.

https://goo.gl/maps/VNfojbQUzmJ2

Work crews will repair a 42-inch concrete sewer pipe under the intersection that failed over the weekend. There is no estimate at this time when repairs will be complete.

For more Information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Sewer construction starting Tuesday will delay traffic on SE Hawthorne at SE 47th

Traffic Advisory

March 21, 2016

Beginning Tuesday, daytime sewer construction will delay traffic on SE Hawthorne Boulevard at SE 47th Avenue for about three days. SE Hawthorne will be reduced to one lane of travel with flaggers.

Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone during work hours from 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. All lanes will re-open to traffic after construction hours.

The work is part of the Hawthorne Green Street and Sewer Project to replace sewer pipes and construct green street planters to manage stormwater runoff.

For information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. 

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City of Portland Launches Public Survey on Portland Harbor Superfund Cleanup

News Release

March 7, 2016
For immediate release
For more information contact Linc Mann, 823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

This spring, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will propose a cleanup plan for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, a decision that will affect all Portlanders.

The city will prepare a formal response to EPA’s proposed cleanup plan. In preparation, the city is asking Portlanders to share what they value most about the cleanup by participating in an online survey.

“The city is working with regulators, other potentially responsible parties and interested parties to ensure a successful Portland Harbor cleanup; protect community interests; and consider the impact of cleanup options on all river users,” said Mayor Charlie Hales. “The survey results will convey Portlanders’ values around the river, and shape the city’s comments to EPA.”

The survey was developed by a Portland State University College of Urban and Public Affairs program called Oregon’s Kitchen Table, which facilitates community engagement on complex issues. Oregon’s Kitchen Table is working with a variety of organizations to encourage participation.

“We want to hear from the community before we comment on any proposed plan,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish.” The ‘Kitchen Table’ survey is one tool that will help us better understand the values and priorities of the people we serve.”

The survey opened today (Monday, March 7, 2016) and will remain open through March 31. In addition to gathering feedback from the community, the city’s public engagement efforts will provide information about when and how Portlanders can participate in EPA’s formal public comment period on the proposed cleanup plan.

Beginning today, the survey as well as additional information about the Portland Harbor cleanup, is available online at www.oregonskitchentable.org. Hard copies are available by calling Sarah Giles at 503-725-5248. The survey has been translated into five languages.

About the Portland Harbor Superfund Site
Portland Harbor has a long history of shipping, industrial and commercial activity because of its key location on the Willamette River. That activity has led to contamination, and in 2000 the EPA listed Portland Harbor as a Superfund Site. The EPA has identified about 150 potentially responsible parties (PRPs). Many are companies or land owners that operated industrial facilities along the river and whose activities may have contributed to the contamination.

Key next steps in the Portland Harbor Superfund cleanup process include EPA’s announcement of a proposed cleanup plan, followed by a 60-day public comment period. EPA’s record of decision, or final cleanup plan, is anticipated in December 2016.

About the City’s Role in the Portland Harbor Superfund
The City of Portland has a unique role in Portland Harbor. The city is a steward of this important community resource, a regulator, and may ultimately be liable for some of the cleanup and restoration of Portland Harbor, mainly due to the potential of the city stormwater system to carry contamination from upland areas to the river. The city got involved early in the process to ensure that the interests of Portlanders were represented in the initial investigation and data collection phase of this complex process.

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Sewage release to the Willamette River south of downtown Portland

Sewage Release Advisory

March 5, 2016

A faulty valve on a sewer pipe released an estimated 600 gallons of sewage last night near the intersection of SW Carey Lane and SW Riverside Drive. Sewage flowed onto a grassy area and some of it reached a catch basin that drains to the Willamette River.

It’s likely that some sewage drained into the Willamette River through a stormwater outfall pipe on the west bank of the river a little over one mile south of the Sellwood Bridge.

https://goo.gl/maps/4HBCmzXxxex

Maintenance crews verified the release late yesterday afternoon and stopped it at about 7:00 p.m. yesterday. As a precaution, people should avoid contact with the river in that area through Sunday afternoon because of the possibility of increased bacteria in the water.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Environmental Services and Portland Water Bureau work to hire more minority and women subcontractors

News Release

February 25, 2016

For more information:
Environmental Services, Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov
Portland Water Bureau, Jaymee Cuti, 503-823-8064, jaymee.cuti@portlandoregon.gov

Environmental Services and the Portland Water Bureau are working to involve more disadvantaged, minority, woman and emerging small business enterprises (D/M/W/ESB) in sewer, stormwater and water construction projects. The two bureaus have set an aspirational goal of directing at least 20% of hard construction costs to D/M/W/ESB subcontractors.

Environmental Services hit the mark in January with Portland City Council approval of a $3.5-million contract to Landis and Landis Construction for the Lower Powell Green Streets and Sewer Project. The contract includes $734,500 to D/M/W/ESB subcontractors. Subcontract work for the Lower Powell project will include traffic control, manhole repairs, signage, trucking, boring and jacking, and concrete cutting.

The Portland Water Bureau routinely meets and exceeds the City of Portland’s M/W/ESB contracting goals, most recently with the Dam 2 Tower Improvement and Powell Butte Reservoirs projects.

“Environmental Services and the Water Bureau are deeply committed to expanding opportunity for D/M/W/ESB contractors,” said Commissioner-in-Charge Nick Fish.

Prime and subcontractors have asked the two utility bureaus for more information about increasing their involvement in utility construction projects. In response, Environmental Services and the Portland Water Bureau scheduled a construction forecast open house to give the contracting community an advance look at upcoming projects. The open house is designed to give primes and subs more time to develop relationships and to bid the work.

Sewer and water utility projects coming up in the next nine months include more than $50-million in pipe, pump station and culvert replacement, green street construction, storage tank repairs and treatment plant improvements.

The free open house is on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1441 NE 2nd Avenue from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Project managers from both bureaus will be on hand to talk to contractors and subcontractors about the kinds of work available in upcoming projects.

Workshop registration is available online at Eventbrite. Contractors and subcontractors can call 503-823-7623 for more information.

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One lane of SE Hawthorne closed at SE 25th

Traffic Advisory

January 27, 2016 - Click here for January 29 update by PBOT.

Sewer repairs have closed the right westbound lane of SE Hawthorne Boulevard between SE 24th and SE 25th avenues.

Westbound traffic on Hawthorne is reduced to a single lane at that location. Eastbound traffic on Hawthorne is not affected.

There is no estimate at this time when repairs will be complete and the right lane of Hawthorne Boulevard will re-open.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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