• Sewer construction on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway at Bertha

    Traffic Advisory

    July 29, 2014
    A sewer repair project that starts tomorrow (Wednesday, July 30) will close one westbound traffic lane on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway just west of SE Bertha Boulevard. The lane will close at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday and remain closed until early evening.

    One eastbound lane of Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway is already closed near SW Bertha for an ongoing outfall pipe repair project. Motorists should expect delays in the area tomorrow. The bike lane through the work area will close during repairs and pedestrians are required to detour around the work site.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    NE Fremont construction delays

    Traffic Advisory

    July 18, 2014

    Sewer construction that begins Monday, July 21 will delay traffic on NE Fremont Street between NE 23rd and 32nd avenues during daytime construction hours through July and August. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

    Work crews will install new main public sewer pipe and constructing several manholes in phases. Some phases will require flaggers to direct traffic.

    The work is part of the Vernon Sabin Alameda Sewer Project to replace or repair about 10,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-


    Night work on NE Broadway at 33rd Avenue begins Monday

    Traffic Advisory

    Overnight sewer construction that begins Monday night, July 7 will close traffic lanes around the intersection of NE Broadway and NE 33rd Avenue. Work hours will be 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday. Construction at the intersection will last for about two weeks.

    http://binged.it/TFNINL

    The construction will detour traffic to I-84 westbound and to 33rd Avenue southbound when all southbound travel lanes on NE 33rd are closed at Broadway. Drivers and bicyclists should expect delays during construction hours.

    The work is part of the Grant Park Sewer Repair Project to replace or repair about 11,500 feet of public sewer pipes that are between 89 and 104 years old and failing due to age.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-

     


    Sewer construction starting Monday will delay NE Fremont traffic

    A sewer construction project that starts Monday, July 7, will delay traffic at the intersection of NE Fremont Street and NE 27th Avenue during daytime construction hours.

    http://binged.it/TFoKhs

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone from 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. This phase of the project will take about one week to complete.

    The work is part of the Vernon Sabin Alameda Sewer Project to replace or repair about 10,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-

     


    Paving project slows SE Division traffic

    Traffic Advisory

    For more information contact:

    Linc Mann, Environmental Services, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

    Diane Dulken, Portland Bureau of Transportation, 503-823-5552, diane.dulken@portlandoregon.gov

    Street grinding and paving is slowing traffic this week on SE Division Street between SE 12th and 21st avenues. The contractor maintains one lane of traffic through the work zone during construction hours but motorists and bicyclists should expect significant delays and avoid the area if possible.

    Construction hours are 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. All lanes re-open after construction hours. The work on SE Division from 12th to 21st is expected to last until early next week. Then the paving crew will start work between SE 21st and SE 26th avenues.

    This work is part of the Division Streetscape Project (www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/streetscape). Environmental Services and the Portland Bureau of Transportation are working together to improve the Division Street transportation corridor, repair and replace older sewers, add green infrastructure to manage stormwater and make sewers work more efficiently, and improve watershed health.

    -30-


    Heavy rain causes sewer overflow to the Willamette River

    June 16, 2014 CSO Advisory

    A brief, intense rainstorm this afternoon caused Portland’s combined sewer system to overflow to the Willamette River. Combined sewage overflowed through an outfall pipe near the Morrison Bridge on the east bank of the river. For the next 48 hours, the public should avoid contact with the river from the Morrison Bridge downstream to the Willamette’s confluence with the Columbia River near Kelley Point Park.

    The combined sewer overflow (CSO) event began shortly after 4:00 p.m. today and lasted for about 12 minutes. As a precaution, the public should avoid contact with river water until the afternoon of Wednesday, June 18.

    It is especially important to avoid recreational activities, such as jet skiing or swimming, during which water could be swallowed. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage. Environmental Services recommends these precautions to protect public health.

    People who fish within 48 hours of a CSO event should wash their hands following contact with river water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River within 48 hours of a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

    Portland’s combined sewer system carries sewage and stormwater runoff in the same pipes. During very heavy rainstorms, the increased stormwater runoff can cause combined sewers to overflow into the Willamette River.

    In December 2011, Portland completed a 20-year program to improve the sewer system and reduce Willamette River CSO events from an average of 50 per year to no more than four per winter and one every third summer.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Construction to close NE 148th Avenue from Sandy to Mason

    Traffic Advisory

    Beginning tomorrow (Tuesday, June 17), sewer construction will close NE 148th Avenue between NE Sandy Boulevard and NE Mason Street during daytime construction hours. Both northbound and southbound traffic will detour around the work area from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

    https://goo.gl/maps/S7rQx

    Construction will take about 14 days to complete. Lanes will re-open to traffic after construction hours.

    The construction is part of a project to construct a facility to divert street runoff to a facility that remove pollutants from stormwater before it flows into the Columbia Slough. The facility is also designed to contain hazardous materials spills before they can enter the slough.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Weekend paving to close lanes on SE Division and SE 12th

    Traffic Advisory

    For immediate release
    For more information contact:
    Linc Mann, Environmental Services, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov
    Dylan Rivera, Portland Bureau of Transportation, 503-823-3723, dylan.rivera@portlandoregon.gov

    This Saturday and Sunday (June 14 and June 15), street grinding and paving will close a lane of traffic on SE Division Street between SE 11th and 12th avenues, and on SE 12th Avenue between SE Division and Clinton streets. The contractor will maintain one lane of traffic through the work zone during construction hours, 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. both days. All lanes will re-open after construction hours.

    Grinding and paving work will continue on Monday, June 16, on SE Division Street between SE 12th and SE 21st avenues. Construction crews will keep one traffic lane open during work hours, 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. All lanes will re-open after construction hours.

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays during work hours. Paving work is weather-dependent.

    This work is part of the Division Streetscape Project. Environmental Services and the Portland Bureau of Transportation are working together to improve the Division Street transportation corridor, repair and replace older sewers, add green infrastructure to manage stormwater and make sewers work more efficiently, and improve watershed health.

    -30-


    Sewage release near NE Marine Drive

    Sewage Release Advisory

    City maintenance crews today discovered a city stormwater pipe that had discharged sewage into a stormwater swale on NE Mariners Loop. The site of the sewage release is south of NE Marine Drive and west of NE 13th Avenue at 1120 NE Mariners Loop.

    https://goo.gl/maps/EIQ5e

    Maintenance crews are investigating the cause of the release.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Lane restrictions on NE 47th Avenue south of Buffalo Slough

    A sewer construction project that started today is closing one traffic lane on NE 47th Avenue during daytime construction hours. Work hours are 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

    During work hours, flaggers are directing traffic through the construction area on NE 47th just south of Buffalo Slough. Both lanes are open to traffic after work hours.

    Construction will last for about two weeks.

    Work crews are installing connections to a new sewage pump station on the east side of NE 47th Avenue. The project will connect about 100 homes and businesses that have been using septic systems to the public sewer system.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Willamette River water quality information online

    People planning to enjoy some recreation on the Willamette River in Portland can check water conditions before they get out on the water. From May to October, Environmental Services staff collects and analyzes water samples weekly at five recreational areas on the river to track E. coli bacteria and water temperature. Environmental Services posts the results on the Willamette River Recreation Index at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/WaterQuality.

    Since the city completed the $1.4-billion combined sewer overflow (CSO) control program in 2011, E. coli results have been consistently low at most sites throughout the summer months. A count of more than 406 E. coli organisms per 100 milliliters of water is above the health standard set by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. E. coli counts in the Willamette are almost always well below that level. The June 3, 2014 E. coli count in river water at the Riverplace Marina, for example, was 5.

    Combined sewers once overflowed to the river an average of 50 times a years. Since Portland controlled CSOs two-and-a-half years ago, there have been only seven CSO events.

    The city’s green stormwater management infrastructure is an important part of the CSO control system. Green street planters, rain gardens, ecoroofs and trees keep millions of gallons of stormwater out of the combined sewer system.

    Because of the success of the CSO control program, Portlanders can enjoy the Willamette River this summer knowing that the water is cleaner now than it has been in generations.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Funding for community watershed health projects

    The Portland City Council today approved grants totaling $95,000 for 13 community watershed health projects in Portland. Community groups can apply annually for grants of up to $10,000 through Portland’s Community Watershed Stewardship Program.

    Grants support innovative projects that improve watershed health and protect water quality. The stewardship program encourages community groups and citizens to get involved in watershed improvement projects and expand watershed stewardship efforts.

    “Portlanders strongly support engaging our citizens in projects that protect water quality and make Portland’s watersheds healthier,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish. “For the average residential sewer ratepayer, the grants represent an investment of about 24 cents a year and every grant dollar invested leverages three dollars in volunteer time and in-kind contributions.”

    Since it began in 1995, the Community Watershed Stewardship Program has granted more than $867,000 for watershed projects and has generated more than $3.3 million dollars in volunteer time and other in-kind contributions. More than 40,000 community volunteers have worked on projects funded by stewardship grants. Projects have enhanced nearly 65 acres of natural area and restored more than 52,000 feet of stream banks.

    City Council approved grants for 13 projects in fiscal year 2014-2015:

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Emergency sewer repairs on SE Grand/Highway 99E completed

    Environmental Services has completed a sewer repair project that closed a lane of traffic and an on-ramp on SE Grand Avenue/Highway 99E just north of the Ross Island Bridge. The 24-hour closures began on May 30. Crews finished repairs and re-opened the lane and on-ramp yesterday afternoon.

    Environmental Services repaired a failing sewer pipe under the roadway.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewer construction on southbound SE Grand Ave/Hwy 99E begins Friday

    A sewer repair project that begins at approximately 6:00 p.m. on Friday, May 30, will require lane restrictions and a ramp closure on SE Grand Avenue/Highway 99E between SE Ivon and SE Woodward streets all hours and all days for two to four weeks. This location is just north of the Ross Island Bridge, before SE Grand Avenue becomes SE McLoughlin Boulevard.

    Construction will occur 24 hours a day, seven days a week, while Environmental Services repairs a segment of failing sewer pipe under southbound SE Grand Avenue/Highway 99E. 

    The right southbound lane on SE Grand Avenue/Highway 99E will be closed in the construction zone. The SE Ivon Street ramp is expected to remain open for vehicles exiting the highway, but the on-ramp will be closed. Detour signs will direct traffic along SE Division Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard south, which turns into SE Grand Avenue/Highway 99E. 

    The traveling public is advised to avoid the area if possible. Motorists should expect significant delays (up to 30 to 40 minutes) due to the lane closure, travel cautiously, and observe all lane closures and directions by flaggers. Motorists wishing to go southbound on Highway 99E are advised to use alternate routes such as Highway 43, I-84 and I-205.

    See Google map at http://tinyurl.com/n6rgzl3. For more information and schedule updates, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/SEGrand.

    Contact Cheryl Kuck at 503-823-7898. 

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Paving work delays N Greeley traffic

    Street paving that began today is delaying traffic on N Greeley Avenue between N Sumner and N Holman streets during daytime construction hours.

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone from 7:00 am. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The paving work will take about four weeks to complete.

    The final paving is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Celebrate Sunday Parkways at the Foster Floodplain Natural Area

    Fish hats!The Foster Floodplain Natural Area will be a lively stop during the East Portland Sunday Parkways this weekend. Visitors between 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 11 can:

    Environmental Services staff ran out of fish hats at last year’s East Portland Sunday Parkways. They have 600 hats this year and they’re likely to go fast.

    Tours will be at noon, 1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. The Foster Floodplain Natural Area is just south of SE Foster Road at the Springwater Trail near SE 104th Avenue.

    Visitors who photograph the natural area and post it at www.facebook.com/CityGreenPortland will be entered in a raffle to win an eco-kit that includes native plants, a bird house kit, and a Wild in the City guide book.

    More Sunday Parkways information is available at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/58929.

    The 63-acre Foster Floodplain Natural Area reduces flooding, protects Johnson Creek water quality and improves fish and wildlife habitat. A paved trail and a Johnson Creek footbridge provide natural area public access.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-

     


    Sewer construction on N Killingsworth

    Sewer construction that started today will delay traffic on N Killingsworth Street between N Interstate and N Concord avenues. During daytime construction hours, Killingsworth is a one-way eastbound street between Interstate and Concord. The westbound traffic lane of Killingsworth is closed at Interstate. Instead of travelling west on Killingsworth from Interstate, vehicles are detouring around the construction area.

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the work area on N Killingsworth during construction hours, 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. This phase of the project will take about one week to complete.

    The work is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    May 21st symposium will explore ecoroof costs and savings

    The sixth annual Portland Ecoroof Symposium is scheduled on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the World Trade Conference Center in downtown Portland. Local and regional experts will share scientific research and case studies exploring the true costs and savings of ecoroofs.

    The symposium is open to the public. Presentations will be targeted toward architects, landscape architects, developers, building owners and facility managers. The event also features a vendor showcase of leading green roof companies from Portland and the surrounding region.

    Registration costs $50, which includes refreshments and lunch. Vendors interested in participating in the Vendor Showcase can reserve a table with an additional $25 fee.

    Get more information at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/53845.

    Ecoroofs are vegetated roof systems that absorb rain to reduce stormwater runoff. They also improve air quality and save energy. There are currently 568 greenroofs in Portland covering over 38 acres.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Paving on N Killingsworth next week will detour and delay traffic between Greeley and Boston

    The eastbound lane of N Killingsworth Street will close to traffic between N Greeley and N Boston avenues beginning early on Monday, April 21. The eastbound lane will be closed all hours and all days for about one week for final street paving following a sewer construction project.

    http://goo.gl/maps/y5IPN

    The westbound lane of Killingsworth will remain open during the paving work but motorists and bicyclists should expect delays and use alternate routes if possible.

    There will be no on-street parking near the work zone. Business patrons and residents who normally park on Killingsworth between Greeley and Boston must park on side streets during the paving project.

    This work is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition. The city installed many of the sewers before 1920. The project reduces the possibility of breaks, leads, blockages and sewage releases to homes, businesses and streets.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewer construction starting Monday will delay N Greeley traffic

    A sewer project that starts Monday, April 14, will delay traffic on N Greeley Avenue between N Sumner and N Emerson streets during daytime construction hours.

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone from 7:00 am. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The project will take about one week to complete.

    This work is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewage release to the Willamette River

    Sewage Release Advisory

    City maintenance crews responding to reports of a missing manhole cover on the evening of March 31, 2014 discovered sewage flowing out of a manhole along Interstate 84 near NE 22nd Avenue. Sewage was flowing over the ground to a stormwater catch basin that discharges to the Willamette River near the interchange of Interstate 5 and Interstate 84 between the Steel and Burnside bridges.

    http://bit.ly/1myPf1J

    Someone had removed the manhole cover and had apparently been disposing of garbage in the manhole. The debris eventually blocked the sewer pipe, which caused sewage to flow out of the manhole. A vactor truck removed the debris and stopped the sewage release at about 12:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 1.

    From the time crews confirmed the sewage release until the time they stopped it, they estimated about 6,000 gallons of sewage had drained into the catch basin and drained into the Willamette.

    Because of increased bacteria in the water, the public should avoid contact with the river between the Burnside and Steel bridges until Thursday, April 3.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Combined sewer overflow to the Willamette River

    Heavy rain on the afternoon of Friday, March 28, 2014 caused Portland’s combined sewer system to overflow to the Willamette River. The public should avoid contact with the river from the Milwaukie Boat Ramp (just south of the Sellwood Bridge) downstream to the Willamette’s confluence with the Columbia River near Kelley Point Park.

    The combined sewer overflow (CSO) event began at about 5:20 p.m. on March 28. As a precaution, the public should avoid contact with river water until Sunday afternoon, March 30.

    It is especially important to avoid recreational activities, such as jet skiing or swimming, during which water could be swallowed. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage. Environmental Services recommends these precautions to protect public health.

    People who fish for 48 hours after a CSO event should wash their hands following contact with river water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River for 48 hours after a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

    Portland’s combined sewer system carries sewage and stormwater runoff in the same pipes. During very heavy rainstorms, the increased stormwater runoff can cause combined sewers to overflow into the Willamette River.

    In December 2011, Portland completed a 20-year program to improve the sewer system and reduce Willamette River CSO events from an average of 50 per year to no more than four per winter and one every third summer.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewage release in Macleay Park near NW Thurman

    City maintenance crews stopped a sewage release in Macleay Park near the NW Thurman Street bridge on Friday afternoon, March 28.

    http://bit.ly/1rMawbZ

    Sewage was leaking from a damaged sewer pipe near the west end of the bridge and draining into a sewer catch basin near the Macleay Park entrance. Maintenance crews completed temporary repairs today to stop the release. The city will design a project to permanently repair the damaged sewer pipe.

    Maintenance crews have cleaned up the spill but warning signs are posted at the site of the leak. The public should use caution entering Macleay Park and walking on the Lower Macleay Trail near the NW Thurman Street Bridge.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewer construction will delay N Killingsworth traffic

    A sewer project that starts on Monday, March 24 will delay traffic on N Killingsworth Street between N Interstate and N Concord avenues during daytime construction hours. Killingsworth will be a one-way eastbound street between Interstate and Concord. The westbound traffic lane of Killingsworth will be closed at Interstate. Westbound traffic will detour around the construction area.

    http://bit.ly/1oGZcvl

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the work zone on N Killingsworth during construction hours, 7:00 am. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The project will close the north and south side of Killingsworth Street at Concord to all traffic. This phase of the project will take one to two weeks to complete.

    This work is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328,


    Tryon Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Plan Update

    The citizen advisory committee (CAC) updating the Tryon Creek plant facilities plan has scheduled a meeting to finalize its recommendations. The public is invited to attend.

    Tryon Creek CAC Meeting
    Wednesday, April 9, 2014
    4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
    Portland Building, Pine Rooms, 10th floor
    1120 SW 5th Avenue, Portland

    After its next meeting, the CAC will hold a public open house to share its recommended facilities plan update and hear community feedback.

    Facilities Plan Open House
    Thursday, April 24
    5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
    Oswego Pointe Condominiums, Riverside Room
    5065 Foothills Drive, Lake Oswego

    For more information contact Becky Tillson at 503-823-2827.


    Sewage release to the Columbia Slough

    City field crews noticed water leaking from a pipe under the Columbia Slough Trail footbridge into the Columbia Slough yesterday afternoon. City maintenance crews determined this morning that the leaking pipe was the 30-inch Inverness Force Main, a pressure sewer that carries wastewater pumped from east Portland.

    The pipe was leaking intermittently each time the Inverness pump station was activated. The city took the 30-inch line out of service to stop the leak and is planning a repair project.

    Maintenance crews posted sewage spill warning signs near the location of the spill. The Columbia Slough Trail footbridge crosses the slough just east of N Portland Road on the north side of the city’s Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    http://bit.ly/1jA9ESZ

    The public should avoid contact with the slough in that area for the next 48 hours because of increased bacteria in the water.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-


    Sewer construction starting Friday will delay N Greeley traffic

    A sewer project that starts Friday, February 21 will delay traffic on N Greeley Avenue between N Jessup and N Holman during daytime construction hours. The project will also close the west side of Greeley at Ainsworth to all traffic. Vehicles using Ainsworth west of Greeley will detour around the construction area.

    http://goo.gl/kxWKBH

    Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone on N Greeley during construction hours, 7:00 am. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The west side of Greeley will be closed at Ainsworth all days and all hours until construction is finished. The project will take two to three weeks to complete.

    This work is part of the $6.5 million dollar Overlook Sewer Replacement Project to replace or repair about 17,000 feet of sewer pipes in poor condition.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-


    Heavy rain but no sewage overflows or Johnson Creek flooding

    More than three inches of rain have fallen in Portland since Friday, but it hasn’t been enough to cause overflows from Portland’s combined sewer system. Before the city completed the $1.4-billion combined sewer overflow (CSO) control program in November 2011, only one-tenth of an inch of rain in 24 hours caused a CSO. In those days, the recent rainfall would have filled combined sewers to capacity and millions of gallons of combined sewage to would have overflowed to the Willamette River.

    Today, Portland’s east side and west side big pipes collect combined sewage that once overflowed during rain storms. The tunnel system filled to about half-full on Friday and Saturday and was 83% full on Monday.

    “Portland’s ratepayers made a significant investment in the Big Pipe to keep sewage out of our river,” said Commissioner in charge Nick Fish. “The last few days of heavy rains tested our system, and I’m pleased that it worked exactly as it was designed to.”

    Portland’s green stormwater management infrastructure works with the CSO control system by keeping stormwater runoff out of the combined sewers. Green infrastructure facilities, including green streets and ecoroofs, manage an estimated two-billion gallons of stormwater annually in neighborhoods with combined sewers.

    The CSO control program included expanding treatment capacity at Portland’s Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant. The plant successfully treated recent high flows the heavy rains created, despite periods of wastewater entering the plant at a rate of 400 million gallons per day.

    This kind of wet weather also once caused flooding along Johnson Creek about every other year. But the creek stayed within its banks during the recent heavy rains.

    The city finished work on the Foster Floodplain Natural Area in 2013 along Foster Road between SE 104th and SE 111th avenues to add 120 acre-feet of flood storage. That’s enough to cover the 63-acre site with about two feet of water. The floodplain project reduces Johnson Creek flood frequency to about every six to eight years.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-


    Free public presentation on adapting to climate change

    University of Virginia Professor Dr. Timothy Beatley will visit Portland on Tuesday, February 11 for a free, public presentation on community strategies for adapting to a changing climate. Beatley’s work focuses on creating sustainable communities and reducing urban ecological footprints.

    The public is invited to this free presentation sponsored by Environmental Services, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Audubon Society of Portland, Friends of Trees, The Intertwine and Urban Greenspaces Institute.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-


    Ash Creek Sewage Leak

    City maintenance crews are investigating a sewage leak into Ash Creek in southwest Portland near the intersection of SW Knightsbridge Drive and SW Orchid Drive.

    http://goo.gl/maps/WSwHS

    Maintenance crews repaired an exposed sewer pipe at this location to stop a previous sewage leak in December 2013. City field crews taking water samples this week found higher than normal bacteria levels in Ash Creek downstream from the pipe.

    On Thursday, January 30, crews again temporarily repaired the pipe to stop the new leak. The city is designing a project to permanently repair the pipe. That work has not yet been scheduled.

    Because of increased bacteria in the water, the public should avoid contact with Ash Creek in this area through Saturday, February 1.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

    -30-

     


    Up to $10,000 available for community projects, pre-applications due February 14

    Environmental Services is accepting proposals for community-based projects that will benefit neighborhoods and communities and improve watershed health in Portland. The Community Watershed Stewardship Program (CWSP) provides grants of up to $10,000. CWSP encourages applications for projects led by people of color, immigrants, elders, youth, people with disabilities, low-income residents and other underrepresented groups.

    Last year, CWSP grants funded 12 community projects. Past projects improved neighborhood livability and developed community leadership by constructing rain gardens to manage stormwater runoff, restoring native plants to improve wildlife habitat, and cleaning up and restoring natural areas.

    “Through environmental education and the practical implementation of green solutions to manage stormwater, Community Watershed Stewardship grants have inspired groups to action across the city,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish. “The impact of these grants is multiplied many times over by the sweat equity of volunteers who take personal ownership of their neighborhood projects.”

    This year, applicants will propose projects by submitting a one-page pre-application form. The pre-application deadline is 4:00 p.m. Friday, February 14. Staff will review the project proposals and invite selected applicants to submit a full application form.

    Program information and application forms are available at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/stewardship. For help developing project ideas and putting together an application, contact Rosa Lehman at 503-823-7917.

    2014 Grant Workshops

    Environmental Services has scheduled three grant workshops to answer questions and help with applications:

    1. Saturday, January 18
      2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
      Holgate Library,7905 SE Holgate Boulevard
    2. Thursday, January 23
      7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
      East Portland Community Center, 740 SE 106th
    3. Monday, January 27
      6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
      Kenton Library, 8226 N Denver

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-


    New Portland stormwater manual in effect

    The City of Portland has adopted an updated version of its Stormwater Management Manual (SWMM). The manual details stormwater management requirements for all Portland development, redevelopment, and improvement projects on private and public property and in the public right-of-way. The revised manual is consistent with current regulatory requirements and policies.

    The City of Portland requires development and improvement projects to manage stormwater runoff on-site. The manual shows developers and property owners a variety of methods to reduce the impact of stormwater runoff on sewer systems, groundwater, rivers and streams. Examples of approved stormwater management facilities include landscaped swales, stormwater planters, vegetative filters, and landscape or underground infiltration.

    The city adopted the original Stormwater Management Manual in 1999 to reduce stormwater impacts and guide stormwater management at development and redevelopment sites. The city issued revised versions in 2002, 2004 and 2008.

    Project designers have the option of using the 2008 Stormwater Management Manual or the 2014 manual until April. After April 2, 2014, designers must use the 2014 manual.

    The 2014 manual, and the 2008 version, are available for download at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/SWMM. Free compact disc versions are available at the Development Services Center,1900 SW 4th Avenue in Portland or by calling 503-823-7103.

    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

    The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with Clean River programs including, water quality protection, wastewater collection and treatment, and sewer installation.

    -30-