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Environmental Services News

2016 News Releases


Table of Contents

(Printable Version)

Stormwater pipe repairs close lanes in the Central Eastside through October

Traffic Advisory

August 23, 2016

Beginning today, August 23, an urgent stormwater pipe repair will close lanes in the Central Eastside District all hours and all days through October: 

  • Northbound lane on SE Water Avenue between SE Clay Street and SE Hawthorne Boulevard, and
  • Westbound lane on SE Clay Street between SE 2nd Avenue and SE Water Avenue.

https://goo.gl/maps/bykZikgWPrR2

Local access only will be provided. Signed detours will direct the traveling public around the construction zone. The public is advised to travel cautiously in the area.

While the sidewalk to the Eastbank Esplanade at the intersection SE Clay Street and SE Water Avenue Esplanade will remain open, it will be narrowed to accommodate construction equipment. Pedestrians and cyclists are advised to observe signed restrictions and share the sidewalk safely.

For information, contact Cheryl Kuck, 503-823-7898, cheryl.kuck@portlandoregon.gov 

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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OHA issued health advisory for Willamette River's Ross Island Lagoon

Media contact: Oregon Health Authority, Tony Andersen, 971-239-6483, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

http://bit.ly/2b5sMca

Health advisory issued August 19 for Willamette River’s Ross Island Lagoon

A health advisory is being issued today for the Ross Island Lagoon and the mouth of the lagoon as it connects to the Holgate Channel. Ross Island Lagoon is located about one river mile south of downtown Portland in Multnomah County.

The advisory is being issued due to visual confirmation of a blue-green algae bloom in the lagoon. Water monitoring has been completed to confirm the type of blue-green algae present, and the level of any potential toxins that may be produced; however, shipping and analysis of the sample will take time. It is expected that data from the analysis of the bloom sample will be available by the middle of next week. At that time, depending upon the level of toxins found in the sample, Oregon Public Health officials will determine if the advisory can be lifted, or if it will continue in place until the bloom is gone.

Because sample analysis is needed to determine if a bloom is producing toxins, and because of the extreme heat predicted over the weekend and through next week, Oregon Public Health officials believe in order to protect the public health, that an advisory based on visual observation and extent of the bloom is warranted until data is available. This is because if toxins are being produced by the bloom, they can be potentially harmful to people, and even at low levels can be very harmful to pets.

Although the advisory is confined at this time to the Ross Island Lagoon and its mouth, the lagoon is influenced by the dynamics of the river which can cause bloom creep as the water in the lagoon rises and recedes. Always be aware that blooms can develop on any waterbody under the right environmental conditions. The Willamette is a big river and blooms can develop in areas along its course where low flow and slow moving water can be found.

If you see areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, follow the motto “When in doubt, stay out.”

Oregon Public Health officials advise people to avoid swallowing or inhaling water droplets as a result of swimming or high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating in areas where blooms are identified.

Drinking water directly from the river where a bloom is identified is especially dangerous since any toxins produced cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters. People who may draw water directly out of this area for drinking or cooking are advised to use an alternative water source. No public drinking or potable water systems are affected.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from any freshwater source affected by a bloom and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins in some cases can produce symptoms very similar to food poisoning such as weakness, cramps, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and fainting. If these symptoms persist or worsen you should seek medical attention. Other toxins can produce numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention for you or your pet. There is no antidote for these toxins but supportive care can treat symptoms and other concerns.

Contact with cells from a bloom can cause skin irritation and a red, puffy rash in individuals with skin sensitivities or those who develop rashes easily.
Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to areas where blooms are identified should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the water.

People may still visit the lagoon and enjoy activities allowed in the area such as bird watching and boating at low speeds. However, in all areas where a bloom has been identified or an advisory is in place, people should avoid any activities that might expose them to ingestion and inhalation.
For more information, or to report a human or pet illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #


Closure of eastbound ramp from N Going to N Greeley begins Monday

Traffic Advisory

August 12, 2016

Beginning at 7:00 a.m. on Monday, August 15, an emergency sewer repair will close the eastbound ramp from N Going Street to N Greeley Avenue all hours and all days for up to two weeks.

https://goo.gl/maps/uWqrGJw5b7G2

A signed detour will direct traffic to N Interstate Avenue. The public is advised to travel cautiously through the construction zone.

For information contact Cheryl Kuck, 503-823-7898, Cheryl.Kuck@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Sewer construction starting Tuesday will delay traffic on SE Milwaukie at SE Franklin

Traffic Advisory

August 8, 2016

Beginning Tuesday, August 9, sewer construction will delay traffic on SE Milwaukie Boulevard at SE Franklin Street for up to five days. 

https://goo.gl/maps/hAg7NWx24yJ2

At the work zone, crews will maintain one northbound lane and one southbound lane to be shared by motorists and cyclists.

The traveling public should expect delays during construction hours from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each day until repairs are complete. All lanes will re-open to traffic after construction hours.

The work is part of the Lower Powell Green Street and Sewer Project to replace aging sewer pipes and construct green street planters to manage stormwater runoff.

For more information contact Cheryl Kuck, 503-823-7898, cheryl.kuck@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Community watershed projects receive grant funding

News Release

July 15, 2016

For information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Portland City Council has approved Community Watershed Stewardship Program (CWSP) grants totaling $100,000 to 13 community groups for projects to improve watershed health. CWSP provides groups with grants of up to $10,000 to engage volunteers in stormwater management and watershed restoration projects.

The program is a partnership between Environmental Services and Portland State University. Since 1995, CWSP has granted more than $1 million for watershed projects and helped organize more than 40,000 volunteers to work on community projects.

“Since 1995, this program has helped diverse groups of creative Portlanders who work together to design new watershed projects and forge new partnerships,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish. “These grants empower community leaders and volunteers in making Portland cleaner and greener.”

The program also helps the Bureau of Environmental Services comply with federal regulations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues permits that require cities to develop programs to reduce stormwater pollution. The EPA recognizes that those programs are more effective when community members and groups join in. Public information, public involvement and public participation are all stormwater permit requirements.

CWSP projects support Portland’s green infrastructure by providing rainwater infiltration, water quality improvement, stream restoration, pavement removal, watershed data collection and flood mitigation. CWSP grants will fund these 13 projects this year:

  1. Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership - Vernon Elementary Stormwater Project ($8,999) Remove 864 square feet of asphalt from the schoolyard and replace it with trees, permeable pavers, and seating
  2. Sabin Community Development - Youth Opportunities Program ($6,000) Provide youth from underrepresented communities with the job skills and an in-depth understanding of watershed function and their personal connection to it
  3. Depave - Greening Bridgeport United Church of Christ ($10,000) Depave 800 square feet of parking lot, add a rain garden and lawn area, install native plants and trees
  4. Bridger Parent Teacher Association - Bridger Rain Garden and Outdoor Classroom ($6,870) Improve existing rain garden and outdoor classroom with educational signage in English and Spanish, raised garden beds, and native plant habitat
  5. ROSE Community Development – Lents Youth Initiative Pollinator Habitat Enhancement ($7,100) Enhance and expand pollinator habitat and connectivity
  6. PSU Indigenous Nations Studies/NAYA - Kah San Chako Haws First Foods Garden ($10,000) A self-sustaining community garden with water-catching systems and native plants to help absorb rain
  7. Johnson Creek Watershed Council - Johnson Creek Cleanup 2016 ($5,500) Instream trash clean up event removing trash from the stream between SE 92nd and SE 17th
  8. National Indian Parent Information Center/Johnson Creek Watershed Council- Native American Youth for the Environment ($7,040) Three volunteer watershed restoration events for Native American youth with special needs
  9. Linnton Community Center - Shipping Container Ecoroof and Vertical Gardens ($5,715) Ecoroof and vertical gardens will provide insulation in summer and capture stormwater in winter, and teach children about environmental stewardship
  10. Linnton Neighborhood Association/Neighbors West-Northwest- Kingsley Community Garden ($7,000) Build a community garden
  11. Tryon Creek Watershed Council -Watershed Restoration Mentors ($10,000) Establish native canopy along streamside properties
  12. Mecha Statewide/Groundwork Portland - Latino Youth Stormwater Microfiltration Study ($6,856) Researching the ability of a species of fungi to remove pollutants from stormwater runoff
  13. City Repair - Pollinator Pathways ($7,000) Create pollinator native plant habitats at five locations along Sunday parkway routes

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Traffic delays on SE Hawthorne at 48th starting Tuesday, July 5

Traffic Advisory

July 1, 2016

Beginning Tuesday, July 5, maintenance crews will repair a hole in SE Hawthorne Boulevard at SE 48th Avenue. The work will reduce SE Hawthorne to one lane between SE 47th and 49th avenues during work hours, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

https://goo.gl/maps/bY9uq5oLjU72

Flaggers will direct traffic through the work zone. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays when work is underway. All lanes will re-open to traffic after construction hours.

Repairs will likely take two days to complete.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Lane restrictions on NE Holman at 112th start Friday

Traffic Advisory

June 23, 2016

A sewer repair project that starts Friday, June 24 will close the eastbound lane of NE Holman Street at NE 112th Avenue. The lane will close during work hours, 6:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Repairs could take several days to complete.

https://goo.gl/maps/VNfojbQUzmJ2

Flaggers will maintain local access in the construction area. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays.

For more Information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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City agreement will keep the Swan Island boat ramp in service

News Release

June 8, 2016
For more information:
Linc Mann, Environmental Services, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov
Mark Ross, Parks & Recreation, 503-823-5300, mark.ross@portlandoregon.gov

The Portland City Council today passed the first reading of an agreement to ensure that the city-owned Swan Island boat ramp continues providing service to recreational boaters. The agreement transfers ownership of the boat ramp from the Bureau of Environmental Services to Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R).

The ramp is on a parcel of waterfront land Environmental Services purchased 20 years ago to build a wet weather wastewater treatment facility as part of the city’s program to control combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River. Several years after the purchase, Environmental Services decided to send all wet weather flow to the city’s Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant and never built the Swan Island plant.

The Port of Portland operated the boat ramp until 1996 through a grant from the Oregon State Marine Board and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The agreement that transferred ownership of the property to Environmental Services included the boat ramp at no cost, but the terms of the original grant required the bureau to operate the ramp until June 30, 2010. After that obligation expired, Environmental Services started the process of declaring the land and the boat ramp surplus property available for sale.

During that process, Portland Parks & Recreation expressed interest in purchasing the boat ramp and two acres of adjacent property for wood chipping operations. The purchase prices is $970,757. Environmental Services will ask City Council to declare the remaining five acres as surplus and transfer it to Portland Parks & Recreation via a sale.

“I’m happy that under our new property disposal policy a property which BES no longer needs will be put to good use by Parks, continuing to serve public recreation,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish.

The Swan Island boat ramp will be the third general use boat ramp in the Portland city limits managed by Portland Parks & Recreation. The property acquisition also addresses another Parks need.

“This agreement serves multiple City needs with one acquisition—the public, boat ramp, and a maintenance facility for Parks. I am pleased that the riverfront is being kept in City ownership,” said City Commissioner Amanda Fritz. “Portland Parks & Recreation will continue to prioritize accessibility for community visitors in this area.”

###


Lane closures on SE Clay Street and SE Water Avenue extended one day

Traffic Advisory

June 2, 2016

Utility location work for a sewer repair project will close SE Clay Street between SE 3rd and SE Water avenues again tomorrow, for one day longer than expected. Lane restrictions on SE Water Avenue at SE Clay Street will also continue tomorrow.

The lane closures are in effect tomorrow during construction hours, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Motorists and bike riders should expect delays. Flaggers will maintain local access only.

The utility locations are part of the design of a project to repair a failing sewer pipe.

For more information, contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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EPA grants Portland $400,000 to help clean contaminated properties

News Release

June 2, 2016

landfill now the site of the Dharma Rain Zen CenterThe Portland Brownfield Program is getting more help from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to identify and clean up contaminated properties. A pair of $200,000 EPA grants will allow the Brownfield Program to give free technical and financial assistance to Portland property owners concerned about possible contamination on their land. Free technical assistance is available for brownfields anywhere in the city, but the grants will provide financial assistance on brownfields in the target area of east Portland.

Similar grants in the past have helped fund several brownfield projects, including the Dharma Rain Zen Center at SE 85th Avenue and Siskiyou Street. The nonprofit Buddhist institution is converting the former quarry and landfill into its new campus with facilities for meditation, classes and living quarters.

A brownfield is a site where past use has left contamination in the soil or groundwater, or where concern about contamination prevents the property’s re-use. The sites of former gas stations, metal plating facilities and dry cleaners are common examples of brownfields. Many sites now considered brownfields once provided jobs and helped fuel the economy. Redeveloping brownfields stimulates the economy while protecting water quality, green space and public health.

For nearly 20 years, Portland has provided technical and financial support to help property owners, developers, and community members recover neighborhood lands. Portland was a recipient of one of the first EPA brownfield grants in 1998.

A 2011 EPA grant helped Portland establish a Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund available to property owners to clean contaminated soil on their land. In addition to managing the loan fund, the Portland Brownfield Program offers free technical and financial assistance to property owners and developers.

For more information, contact the Brownfield Program at 503-823-7764 or visit www.brownfield.org.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Lane closures on SE Clay Street and SE Water Avenue

Traffic Advisory

June 1, 2016

Utility location work for a sewer repair project has closed SE Clay Street between SE 3rd and SE Water avenues. There are also lane restrictions on SE Water Avenue at SE Clay Street. Flaggers are maintaining local access only.

The lane closures are in effect today and tomorrow during construction hours, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. both days.

The utility locations are part of the design of a project to repair a failing sewer pipe.

For more Information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Lane restrictions on NE Holman at 112th start Tuesday

Traffic Advisory

May 27, 2016

A sewer repair project that starts Tuesday, May 31 will close the eastbound lane of NE Holman Street at NE 112th Avenue and will close NE 112th at Holman. The lane restrictions will be in effect all hours and all days until repairs are complete. The work could take up to one month to complete.

https://goo.gl/maps/VNfojbQUzmJ2

Flaggers will maintain local access in the construction area. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays.

Crews will permanently repair a 42-inch concrete sewer pipe that failed in April. Work crews made temporary repairs last month and re-opened the intersection until design of a permanent repair project was complete.

For more Information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Advisory

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Advisory

May 19, 2016

Heavy rain this evening caused Portland’s combined sewer system to overflow from the Alder Pump Station Outfall to the Willamette River. Because of increased bacteria in the water, the public should avoid contact with the Willamette River from the Morrison Bridge to the Columbia River confluence for 48 hours after the CSO event ends.

The event began at 4:58 p.m. this evening and lasted about 16 minutes with a volume of 16,500 gallons.

Portland’s combined sewer system carries sewage and stormwater runoff in the same pipes. In December 2011, Portland completed a 20-year program of sewer improvements, including constructing big pipes on both sides of the Willamette River and along the Columbia Slough. The improvements eliminate 99% of CSOs from the slough and 94% from the river.

During extremely heavy rain, the big pipes store large quantities of stormwater and sewage while pumping it to the Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant. During very heavy rain storms, some combined sewage can overflow. That is what the system is designed to do and that is the way it operates.

A combined sewer overflow is about 80% stormwater and 20% sanitary sewage. Before the city completed the CSO control program, combined sewers overflowed an average of 50 times a year. Today, the combined system overflows to the Willamette River an average of four times per winter and once every three summers.

For information contact Cheryl Kuck, 503-823-7898, Cheryl.Kuck@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Ramp from SE 17th to Powell westbound closes

Traffic Advisory

May 6, 2016

Beginning Monday, May 9, sewer construction on Powell Boulevard will close SE 17th Avenue northbound at SE Haig Street. The work will close the northbound SE 17th Avenue ramp that merges onto SE Powell westbound. The ramp will remain closed all days and all hours for up to 50 days.

During the ramp closure, northbound traffic on SE 17th will detour to SE McLoughlin Boulevard. The ramp closure will not affect pedestrian and bicycle traffic or southbound traffic on SE 17th Avenue. Traffic will also continue to flow in both directions on SE Powell Boulevard throughout construction.

This work is part of the Lower Powell Green Street and Sewer Project to replace or repair 4,500 feet of 100-year-old sewers in poor condition. More information is available at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/LowerPowell.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Nighttime lane closures on Powell to prepare for closure of ramp from SE 17th northbound to SE Powell westbound

Traffic Advisory

May 4, 2016

Starting tonight (Wednesday, May 4), sewer construction preparation will close one lane of SE Powell Boulevard in each direction between SE 10th Avenue and SE 15th Avenue for three nights. The overnight lane closures will last from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

The lane closures this week will allow construction crews to prepare to close the northbound ramp from SE 17th Avenue to Powell Boulevard westbound beginning Monday, May 9. Sewer construction will close the ramp 24 hours a day for up to 50 days.

During the ramp closure, northbound traffic on SE 17th will detour to SE McLoughlin Boulevard. The ramp closure will not affect pedestrian and bicycle traffic or southbound traffic on SE 17th Avenue. Traffic will also continue to flow in both directions on SE Powell Boulevard throughout construction.

This work is part of the Lower Powell Green Street and Sewer Project to replace or repair 4,500 feet of 100-year-old sewers in poor condition. Go to www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/LowerPowell for more information.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Traffic restrictions on SE Hawthorne and SE 50th

Traffic Advisory

April 29, 2016

Sewer construction starting Monday, May 2, 2016 will restrict traffic to local access only on SE Hawthorne Boulevard from SE Cesar Chavez Boulevard to SE 50th Avenue, and on SE 50th from SE Hawthorne Boulevard to SE Division Street.

Traffic restrictions will be in place all hours and all days for up to three weeks. Flaggers will move local traffic through work zones in both directions using a single lane.

Construction will cause traffic delays. Motorists and bicyclists who don’t need local access should use alternate routes.

The work is part of the Hawthorne Green Street and Sewer Project to replace sewer pipes and construct green street planters to manage stormwater runoff.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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An Earth Day look at 20 years of bringing back native vegetation

News Release

April 22, 2016

This Earth Day, people and wildlife on the Columbia Slough can enjoy the successes of a program responsible for planting more than one million native trees and shrubs in Portland watersheds over the last 20 years. The Bureau of Environmental Services Watershed Revegetation Program manages natural area and riparian corridor restoration work that supports improvement to water quality and natural habitat functions in the Portland metropolitan area.

The program started work in the Columbia Slough watershed in February 1996. Since then, revegetation teams have planted over 1.3-million native tree and shrub seedlings and restored vegetation on over 1,100 acres of natural area and riparian corridor in the slough watershed.

The program worked so well along the Columbia Slough that Environmental Services expanded it to the Johnson Creek watershed in 2000. Today, the program works on restoration projects all around Portland, but reforestation of the slough’s riparian corridors has always been the cornerstone of its work.

People who canoe the slough today are likely to enjoy dense stands of native trees and shrubs on both banks. But 20 years ago, the view was more likely to be industrial buildings and dense stands of invasive blackberries growing out of control.

near the St. Johns landfill 1997  near the St. Johns landfill 2013
A slough bank near the St. Johns landfill in 1997 (left) and in 2013 (right)

The change in landscape along the slough is dramatic in many places because of the program and the support and cooperation of many landowners and project partners including Multnomah County Drainage District, Portland Parks & Recreation, Metro and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council.

Through the Watershed Revegetation Program, Environmental Services forms partnerships with public and private landowners to restore degraded stream bank and upland areas. The restoration work improves water quality, controls erosion, reduces stormwater pollution, aids in long-term salmon recovery, and enhances wildlife habitat.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328,

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Maintenance crews stop a sewage release to a Fanno Creek tributary in southwest Portland

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory Update
(this is not a combined sewer overflow [CSO] advisory)

April 6, 2016

Work crews today successfully stopped sewage flowing from a broken pipe in a steep ravine near SW Carolina Street and SW 32nd Avenue. Field crews investigating sewer odors discovered the leak on Monday.

https://goo.gl/maps/j4ohu1Tiqsv

Because the area is too steep for machinery, maintenance crews worked by hand to expose the broken pipe and stop the leak. They made temporary repairs while engineers design permanent repairs.

Sewage from the broken pipe flowed into an unnamed tributary that joins Fanno Creek near SW 30th and Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, about four blocks from the point of the sewage release. The public should avoid contact with Fanno Creek in that area through this Friday afternoon.

The City of Portland treats an average of 70 million gallons of wastewater each day. Over one-third of Portland’s more than 2,500 miles of sewer pipes are over 80 years old. Pipes that fail or become blocked with grease, tree roots and debris can cause sewage overflows. The sewage release in southwest Portland is not related to Portland’s combined sewer overflow control system.

For more information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Sewage release to Fanno Creek tributary in southwest Portland

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory

(this is not a combined sewer overflow [CSO] advisory)

April 4, 2016

Maintenance crews are working to stop a sewage release to a small tributary of Fanno Creek. Field crews investigating odor complaints today discovered sewage flowing from broken pipe into the unnamed tributary.

Crews discovered the sewage release near the intersection of SW Carolina Street and SW 32nd Avenue.

https://goo.gl/maps/j4ohu1Tiqsv

Maintenance crews are unable to estimate how much sewage has been released or how long it will take to make repairs and stop the release. The City of Portland treats an average of 70 million gallons of wastewater each day.

The tributary flows into Fanno Creek near SW 30th and Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, about four blocks from the point of the sewage release. The public should avoid contact with Fanno Creek in that area until the leak is repaired.

Over one-third of Portland’s more than 2,500 miles of sewer pipes are over 80 years old. Pipes that fail or become blocked with grease, tree roots and debris can cause sewage overflows. The sewage release discovered today is not related to Portland’s combined sewer overflow control system.

For more information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Lane closed at NE Holman and 112th

Traffic Advisory

April 4, 2016

Sewer repairs have closed the eastbound lane of NE Holman Street at NE 112th Avenue. Flaggers are directing traffic around the work zone 24 hours a day until repairs are complete. Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays.

https://goo.gl/maps/VNfojbQUzmJ2

Work crews will repair a 42-inch concrete sewer pipe under the intersection that failed over the weekend. There is no estimate at this time when repairs will be complete.

For more Information: Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Sewer construction starting Tuesday will delay traffic on SE Hawthorne at SE 47th

Traffic Advisory

March 21, 2016

Beginning Tuesday, daytime sewer construction will delay traffic on SE Hawthorne Boulevard at SE 47th Avenue for about three days. SE Hawthorne will be reduced to one lane of travel with flaggers.

Motorists and bicyclists should expect delays in the construction zone during work hours from 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. All lanes will re-open to traffic after construction hours.

The work is part of the Hawthorne Green Street and Sewer Project to replace sewer pipes and construct green street planters to manage stormwater runoff.

For information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. 

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City of Portland Launches Public Survey on Portland Harbor Superfund Cleanup

News Release

March 7, 2016
For immediate release
For more information contact Linc Mann, 823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov

This spring, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will propose a cleanup plan for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, a decision that will affect all Portlanders.

The city will prepare a formal response to EPA’s proposed cleanup plan. In preparation, the city is asking Portlanders to share what they value most about the cleanup by participating in an online survey.

“The city is working with regulators, other potentially responsible parties and interested parties to ensure a successful Portland Harbor cleanup; protect community interests; and consider the impact of cleanup options on all river users,” said Mayor Charlie Hales. “The survey results will convey Portlanders’ values around the river, and shape the city’s comments to EPA.”

The survey was developed by a Portland State University College of Urban and Public Affairs program called Oregon’s Kitchen Table, which facilitates community engagement on complex issues. Oregon’s Kitchen Table is working with a variety of organizations to encourage participation.

“We want to hear from the community before we comment on any proposed plan,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish.” The ‘Kitchen Table’ survey is one tool that will help us better understand the values and priorities of the people we serve.”

The survey opened today (Monday, March 7, 2016) and will remain open through March 31. In addition to gathering feedback from the community, the city’s public engagement efforts will provide information about when and how Portlanders can participate in EPA’s formal public comment period on the proposed cleanup plan.

Beginning today, the survey as well as additional information about the Portland Harbor cleanup, is available online at www.oregonskitchentable.org. Hard copies are available by calling Sarah Giles at 503-725-5248. The survey has been translated into five languages.

About the Portland Harbor Superfund Site
Portland Harbor has a long history of shipping, industrial and commercial activity because of its key location on the Willamette River. That activity has led to contamination, and in 2000 the EPA listed Portland Harbor as a Superfund Site. The EPA has identified about 150 potentially responsible parties (PRPs). Many are companies or land owners that operated industrial facilities along the river and whose activities may have contributed to the contamination.

Key next steps in the Portland Harbor Superfund cleanup process include EPA’s announcement of a proposed cleanup plan, followed by a 60-day public comment period. EPA’s record of decision, or final cleanup plan, is anticipated in December 2016.

About the City’s Role in the Portland Harbor Superfund
The City of Portland has a unique role in Portland Harbor. The city is a steward of this important community resource, a regulator, and may ultimately be liable for some of the cleanup and restoration of Portland Harbor, mainly due to the potential of the city stormwater system to carry contamination from upland areas to the river. The city got involved early in the process to ensure that the interests of Portlanders were represented in the initial investigation and data collection phase of this complex process.

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Sewage release to the Willamette River south of downtown Portland

Sewage Release Advisory

March 5, 2016

A faulty valve on a sewer pipe released an estimated 600 gallons of sewage last night near the intersection of SW Carey Lane and SW Riverside Drive. Sewage flowed onto a grassy area and some of it reached a catch basin that drains to the Willamette River.

It’s likely that some sewage drained into the Willamette River through a stormwater outfall pipe on the west bank of the river a little over one mile south of the Sellwood Bridge.

https://goo.gl/maps/4HBCmzXxxex

Maintenance crews verified the release late yesterday afternoon and stopped it at about 7:00 p.m. yesterday. As a precaution, people should avoid contact with the river in that area through Sunday afternoon because of the possibility of increased bacteria in the water.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Environmental Services and Portland Water Bureau work to hire more minority and women subcontractors

News Release

February 25, 2016

For more information:
Environmental Services, Linc Mann, 503-823-5328, linc.mann@portlandoregon.gov
Portland Water Bureau, Jaymee Cuti, 503-823-8064, jaymee.cuti@portlandoregon.gov

Environmental Services and the Portland Water Bureau are working to involve more disadvantaged, minority, woman and emerging small business enterprises (D/M/W/ESB) in sewer, stormwater and water construction projects. The two bureaus have set an aspirational goal of directing at least 20% of hard construction costs to D/M/W/ESB subcontractors.

Environmental Services hit the mark in January with Portland City Council approval of a $3.5-million contract to Landis and Landis Construction for the Lower Powell Green Streets and Sewer Project. The contract includes $734,500 to D/M/W/ESB subcontractors. Subcontract work for the Lower Powell project will include traffic control, manhole repairs, signage, trucking, boring and jacking, and concrete cutting.

The Portland Water Bureau routinely meets and exceeds the City of Portland’s M/W/ESB contracting goals, most recently with the Dam 2 Tower Improvement and Powell Butte Reservoirs projects.

“Environmental Services and the Water Bureau are deeply committed to expanding opportunity for D/M/W/ESB contractors,” said Commissioner-in-Charge Nick Fish.

Prime and subcontractors have asked the two utility bureaus for more information about increasing their involvement in utility construction projects. In response, Environmental Services and the Portland Water Bureau scheduled a construction forecast open house to give the contracting community an advance look at upcoming projects. The open house is designed to give primes and subs more time to develop relationships and to bid the work.

Sewer and water utility projects coming up in the next nine months include more than $50-million in pipe, pump station and culvert replacement, green street construction, storage tank repairs and treatment plant improvements.

The free open house is on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 1441 NE 2nd Avenue from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Project managers from both bureaus will be on hand to talk to contractors and subcontractors about the kinds of work available in upcoming projects.

Workshop registration is available online at Eventbrite. Contractors and subcontractors can call 503-823-7623 for more information.

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One lane of SE Hawthorne closed at SE 25th

Traffic Advisory

January 27, 2016 - Click here for January 29 update by PBOT.

Sewer repairs have closed the right westbound lane of SE Hawthorne Boulevard between SE 24th and SE 25th avenues.

Westbound traffic on Hawthorne is reduced to a single lane at that location. Eastbound traffic on Hawthorne is not affected.

There is no estimate at this time when repairs will be complete and the right lane of Hawthorne Boulevard will re-open.

For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328.

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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