Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

Environmental Services

working for clean rivers

Phone: 503-823-7740

Fax: 503-823-6995

1120 SW 5th Avenue, Room 1000, Portland, OR 97204

June 2009

Free stormwater retrofit workshop - 6/3/09

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 6/5/09

Grant program supports community restoration projects - 6/9/09

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 6/11/09

Sewer work will slow traffic on N Denver Avenue at N Farragut - 6/12/09

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 6/19/09

Southbound detour on NE 47th north of Columbia Boulevard - 6/23/09

Lane restrictions on E Burnside between 13th and 17th - 6/25/09

  

Free stormwater retrofit workshop

June 3, 2009

The City of Portland holds free workshops to show ratepayers how to manage stormwater on their property. The workshops cover site assessment; how to choose, install and maintain stormwater facilities; any necessary permits; and financial incentives.

Stormwater Retrofit Workshop

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Multnomah Arts Center

7688 SW Capitol Highway

Get more information at www.CleanRiverRewards.com or call 503-823-1371.

(back to top)

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use

June 5, 2009

Due to the most recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed. Portland's Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect the public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River should cook them thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in what is called a combined sewer system. When the combined sewer system receives too much runoff, it overflows into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 18th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms, although as the program progresses, CSO volume and the number of outfall pipes that overflow are diminishing.

(back to top)

Grant program supports community restoration projects

June 9, 2009

The Portland City Council will consider awarding $95,000 in Community Watershed Stewardship Program (CSWP) grants for 16 watershed projects in Portland. CWSP involves community and student groups in watershed improvement projects and leverages community resources to expand stewardship efforts.

Grant recipients use funds for native plants, supplies, equipment, room rentals, transportation, and technical assistance for community-based watershed projects. Projects include invasive plant removal, native plantings, bioswale and ecoroof construction, and natural area cleanup and restoration. The 16 projects funded by 2009-2010 CWSP grants are:

  • Columbia Slough Watershed Council Eyes on the Slough, $4,675
  • Holy Redeemer Community Garden, $10,000
  • Reynolds After School Environmentalists, $3,000
  • Big Four Minority Youth Trail Building, $4,515
  • Friends of Tryon Creek Ecology Field Team, $5,446
  • Tryon Creek Watershed Council Restoration Mentors, $6,100
  • Friends of Vermont Creek Cavity Habitat Restoration, $2,760
  • Portland Community College-Sylvania Habitat Restoration Team, $6,890
  • Franciscan Montessori Stormwater ALIVE!, $8,410
  • Friends of Tideman Johnson Restoration and Biomonitoring, $6,400
  • Three Rivers Land Conservancy Baltimore Woods Restoration, $7,000
  • Heron Pointe Wetlands Rehabilitation, $4,400
  • Depave, $6,404
  • St. Francis Onsite Stormwater Management, $10,000
  • Brooklyn Country Lane Green Street, $3,000
  • Portland State University Look Up and See Green, $6,000

CWSP is a partnership between the City of Portland's Environmental Services, Portland State University and Northwest Service Academy/AmeriCorps. “For 15 years, CWSP volunteers have worked to improve watershed health and neighborhood livability,” said Dan Saltzman, City Commissioner in charge of Environmental Services. “Most importantly, it has made thousands of community volunteers and students our partners in caring for our most important natural resources,” Saltzman said.

Since 1995, CWSP has granted over $800,000 for more than 180 projects. These funds were matched by more than $2.3 million worth of donations of services, materials and volunteer time.

(back to top)

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use

June 11, 2009

Due to the most recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed. Portland's Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect the public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River should cook them thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in what is called a combined sewer system. When the combined sewer system receives too much runoff, it overflows into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 18th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms, although as the program progresses, CSO volume and the number of outfall pipes that overflow are diminishing.

(back to top)

Sewer work will slow traffic on N Denver Avenue at N Farragut

June 12, 2009

A sewer construction project will slow daytime traffic at the intersection of N Denver Avenue and N Farragut Street starting next Monday, June 15. The project will close one traffic lane on Denver at Farragut during work hours, 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on weekdays.

Motorists should expect delays while construction is underway. All lanes will be restored after construction hours. Construction at the intersection will take about two weeks.

(back to top)

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use

June 19, 2009

Due to the most recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed. Portland's Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect the public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River should cook them thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in what is called a combined sewer system. When the combined sewer system receives too much runoff, it overflows into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 18th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms, although as the program progresses, CSO volume and the number of outfall pipes that overflow are diminishing.

(back to top)

Southbound detour on NE 47th north of Columbia Boulevard

June 23, 2009

Sewer construction has closed NE 47th Avenue to southbound traffic, and only northbound traffic is allowed between NE Buffalo Street and NE Columbia Boulevard. The traffic change will be in effect all days and all hours through mid-October.

Motorists traveling north on 47th Avenue north of Buffalo Street can take NE Cornfoot Road east to NE Alderwood and turn left on Alderwood to access NE 82nd Avenue or right on Alderwood to access NE Columbia Boulevard.

Construction hours are 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and possibly the same hours on Saturdays. Motorists should expect delays during work hours.

(back to top)

Lane restrictions on E Burnside between 13th and 17th

June 24, 2009

Sewer construction is reducing daytime traffic on East Burnside Street to one lane in each direction between SE 13th and SE 17th avenues. The lane restrictions are in place during work hours, 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. All four lanes are open to traffic after work hours.

The daytime lane restrictions will be in place for several weeks. Motorists should expect delays and consider using alternate routes.

(back to top)

For information about Environmental Services programs, contact Linc Mann at  503-823-5328.