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Environmental Services

working for clean rivers

Phone: 503-823-7740

Fax: 503-823-6995

1120 SW 5th Avenue, Room 1000, Portland, OR 97204

September 2010

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 9/1/10

Mt. Tabor Park Project walking tour and public meeting - 9/2/10

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 9/7/10

 

SW Yamhill Street closed between SW 10th and 12th - 9/9/10

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 9/16/10

Controlled burn scheduled in Columbia Slough Watershed - 9/16/10

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use - 9/23/10

 

City recommends caution for recreational river use

September 1, 2010

Due to the recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed to the Willamette River. Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River during a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in a combined sewer system. When the combined sewers receive too much runoff, they overflow into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 19th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete in December 2011, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms. After all CSO projects are complete in December 2011, combined sewers will overflow an average of four times each winter and once every three summers instead of every time it rains.

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Mt. Tabor Park Project walking tour and public meeting

September 2, 2010

Work begins this fall to remove invasive plants in Mt. Tabor Park and restore native vegetation to improve watershed health and wildlife habitat. There are two public opportunities to learn more about the project.

Walking Tour (rain or shine)

Saturday, September 11

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Meet at the main parking lot in Mt. Tabor Park and tour the project site. Children are welcome. Free coffee.

Public Meeting

Monday, September 13

6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Mt. Tabor Presbyterian Church, 5441 SE Belmont

Get more information about the project and meet the project staff.

RSVPs for both events are appreciated but not required. For more information, call 503-823-4886 or email mttabor.reveg@portlandoregon.gov. Visit http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/mttabor for more project information.

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City recommends caution for recreational river use

September 7, 2010

Due to the recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed to the Willamette River. Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River during a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in a combined sewer system. When the combined sewers receive too much runoff, they overflow into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 19th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete in December 2011, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms. After all CSO projects are complete in December 2011, combined sewers will overflow an average of four times each winter and once every three summers instead of every time it rains.

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SW Yamhill Street closed between SW 10th and 12th

September 9, 2010

Sewer construction has closed SW Yamhill Street between SW 10th and 12th avenues. The two blocks of Yamhill will be closed 24 hours a day, seven days a week until sewer repairs are complete in mid-November.

Detour signs and flaggers are directing traffic around the construction area.

Environmental Services is replacing 360 feet of sewer pipe, including a 12-inch sewer pipe that is failing.

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City recommends caution for recreational river use

September 16, 2010

Due to the recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed to the Willamette River. Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River during a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in a combined sewer system. When the combined sewers receive too much runoff, they overflow into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 19th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete in December 2011, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms. After all CSO projects are complete in December 2011, combined sewers will overflow an average of four times each winter and once every three summers instead of every time it rains.

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Controlled burn scheduled in Columbia Slough Watershed

September 16, 2010

On Saturday, September 25, Portland Fire & Rescue will burn six acres of invasive vegetation at Mason Flats Wetland near NE Airport Way and NE 170th Avenue. There is no public access to the city-owned property.

The controlled burn will remove reed canarygrass, Himalayan blackberry and other invasive plants. Burning invasive vegetation reduces the need for mechanical and chemical controls, and provides wildland firefighting training for Portland Fire & Rescue personnel.

The burn will prepare the site to plant native vegetation. Restoring native grasses, shrubs, sedges, rushes and other wetland plants will create a more diverse and healthy ecosystem, and will improve water quality and wildlife habitat.

Based on the amount of flammable material on the site, Portland Fire & Rescue estimates the fire will last about 40 minutes and mop-up will take about two hours. Fire personnel will monitor the site for at least 24 hours after the burn. Environmental Services and Portland Parks & Recreation are responsible for ongoing management of the Mason Flats Wetland Project.

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City recommends caution for recreational river use

September 23, 2010

Due to the recent rainstorm, Portland’s combined sewers have overflowed to the Willamette River. Environmental Services advises the public against any recreational activity in the Willamette River during which water could be swallowed.

The public should avoid the Willamette River for 48 hours after the rain has stopped. It is especially important to avoid recreational activities–such as water skiing, jet skiing or swimming–during which water could be swallowed. While health risks from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are unknown, Environmental Services takes these precautions to protect public health.

People who fish should wash their hands following contact with the water. Those who choose to eat fish caught in the Willamette River during a CSO event should cook the fish thoroughly to kill bacteria.

In many areas of Portland, sewage mixes with stormwater runoff in a combined sewer system. When the combined sewers receive too much runoff, they overflow into the Willamette River. CSOs are contaminated with bacteria from untreated sewage.

Portland is in the 19th year of a 20-year program to improve the city's sewer system. Until the program is complete in December 2011, overflows of untreated sewage and stormwater will occur during rainstorms. After all CSO projects are complete in December 2011, combined sewers will overflow an average of four times each winter and once every three summers instead of every time it rains.

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For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328