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Take a look at Portland’s iconic views and notable viewpoints in the updated Scenic Resources Inventory; then tell us what you think

ow through May 31, Portlanders are invited to submit comments on an inventory of some of Portland’s favorite vistas of the Central City

Where do you take your out-of-town visitors to show off Portland? Up to the Washington Park Rose Garden to take in the sweeping, panoramic views of the skyline and Mt Hood? Or maybe you head downtown for a stroll along the waterfront or up to the top of Big Pink for views of the many bridges over the Willamette River. Scenic resources like these help define the character of the Central City and shape the image of Portland and the region.

To help preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of views, viewpoints and scenic corridors within and of the Central City. At 25-years-old, the Central City portion of the Scenic Resources Inventory (CCSRI) is getting a refresh as part of the update of the Central City Plan.

Last summer we asked Portlanders to nominate their favorite views and viewpoints. Those that met a set of criteria were added to the list of existing views and viewpoints from the 1989 SRI as well as new views and viewpoints identified in the field. Staff then put them in a database and subjected each view and viewpoint to rigorous analysis by a team of independent reviewers.

The resulting draft CCSRI includes a mix of scenic resources, including 152 views from 144 viewpoints, 15 view streets, 6 scenic corridors, 22 visual focal points and 5 scenic sites.

Take a Look

The public is invited to review the draft CCSRI to help ensure that all Central City scenic resources are included in the inventory. Did we get them all? Did we miss something? Take a look and tell us what you think.

Public comments on the CCSRI are welcome through May 31, 2015.

How to Comment

Visit the project website for more information about the draft Central City Scenic Resources Inventory and to read specific chapters or download the full draft plan.

Then share your feedback on the draft inventory using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by …

Phone: 503-823-7831

Email to: mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov

Postal mail to:

Mindy Brooks

City of Portland

Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100

Portland, OR 97201

Comments on the draft CCSRI are due by May 31, 2015.

Background and next steps

Scenic resources in Portland have been protected over the past 30 years through various plans and regulations, including the 1983 Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan, 1987 Willamette Greenway Plan and 1991 Scenic Resources Protection Plan.

The purpose of the CCSRI is to provide useful information on the location and quality of existing public scenic resources in and around Portland’s Central City. The inventory includes descriptions, evaluations, photos and maps of public views and viewpoints, scenic corridors, view streets, visual focal points and scenic sites located in the Central City inventory area. The inventory does not make recommendations about which scenic resources should be protected.

The next phase of the project will include an in-depth analysis of the trade-offs involved in protecting — or not protecting — each scenic resource. Staff will consider the effect of building height and massing on significant views as well as alternatives for vegetation management to maintain or enhance scenic resources.

The results of the analysis will be used to draft a scenic resources protection plan for the Central City, which will include staff recommendations of which scenic resources to protect and maintain and what tools to use to implement these recommendations. The scenic resources protection plan will inform updates to the Central City 2035 Plan including changes to zoning regulations and maps. The public will be able to review and comment on the draft CC2035 Plan, including the draft scenic resources protection plan, when the CC2035 Plan is released (currently scheduled for early 2016).

Now through May 31, the public is invited to comment on an inventory of some of Portland’s favorite vistas of the Central City

Take a look at Portland’s iconic views and viewpoints in the updated Central City Scenic Resources Inventory; then tell the City what you think

Where do you take your out-of-town visitors to show off Portland? Up to the Washington Park Rose Garden to take in the sweeping, panoramic views of the skyline and Mt Hood? Maybe you head downtown for a stroll along the waterfront or South Park Blocks. Or take a ride on the Aerial Tram to OHSU for views of the many bridges over the Willamette River, special buildings and scenic landmarks.

Scenic resources like these help define the character of the Central City and shape the image of Portland and the region.

To help preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of public views, viewpoints and other scenic resources within and of the Central City. At 25-years-old, the Central City portion of the Scenic Resources Inventory (CCSRI) is getting a refresh as part of the update of the Central City Plan.

Take a Look
The public is invited to review the draft CCSRI to help ensure that all Central City scenic resources are included in the inventory. Did we get them all? Did we miss something? Take a look and tell us what you think.

Public comments on the CCSRI are welcome through May 31, 2015.

How to Comment
Visit the project website for more information about the draft Central City Scenic Resources Inventory and to read or download specific chapters of the draft inventory.

Then share your feedback on the draft inventory using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by …

  • Phone: 503-823-7831
  • Email to: mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov
  • Postal mail to:

Mindy Brooks
City of Portland
Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100
Portland, OR 97201

Comments on the draft CCSRI are due by May 31, 2015.

Background and next steps
Last summer we asked the public to nominate their favorite views and viewpoints in the Central City. Those that met a set of criteria were added to the list of existing views and viewpoints from the 1989 inventory as well as new scenic resources identified in the field. Staff then put them in a database and subjected each view and viewpoint to rigorous analysis by a team of independent reviewers.
The resulting draft CCSRI includes a mix of scenic resources, including 152 views from 144 viewpoints, 15 view streets, 6 scenic corridors, 22 visual focal points and 5 scenic sites.

The purpose of the CCSRI is to provide useful information on the location and quality of existing public scenic resources in and around Portland’s Central City. The inventory includes descriptions, evaluations, photos and maps of public views and viewpoints, scenic corridors, view streets, visual focal points and scenic sites located in the Central City inventory area. The inventory does not make recommendations about which scenic resources should be protected.

Scenic resources in Portland have been protected over the past 30 years through various plans and regulations, including the 1983 Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan, 1987 Willamette Greenway Plan and 1991 Scenic Resources Protection Plan.

Portland City Council approves energy performance reporting for commercial buildings

Commercial buildings are responsible for nearly a quarter of Portland's carbon emissions and spend more than $335 million on energy every year.

On Earth Day, Portland City Council voted unanimously to approve a new policy that will require owners of commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to track energy use and report it on an annual basis. The policy will cover nearly 80 percent of the commercial square footage and affect approximately 1,000 buildings.

“Portland has set a goal to cut carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. To reach that goal, we all have a role to play — public and private, at work and at home,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. “Reducing energy use in buildings is a critical part of that picture. Tracking energy use and investing in energy efficiency saves money for the building owners. And for the city as a whole. Last year alone, the city saved $6 million on its own energy bills.”

The policy will cover offices, retail spaces, grocery stores, hotels, health care and higher education buildings. It does not include residential properties, nursing homes, and places of worship, parking structures, K-12 schools, industrial facilities or warehouses.

“Today, my clients, tenant customers and staff expect energy efficiency,” said David Genrich, general manager, JLL, a professional services and investment management company specializing in real estate. “Tracking energy use has become a core responsibility of good building managers, and this policy ensures consistency across the board.”

The new Energy Performance Reporting Policy will require commercial buildings to track performance with a free online tool called ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and report energy use information to the City of Portland on an annual basis. There are approximately 5,000 commercial buildings in Portland. Currently fewer than 100 buildings claim ENERGY STAR certification.

“The fact that the policy requires the use of the Energy Star Portfolio Manager in reporting makes a lot of sense. It’s widely used, it is well recognized, it has a lot of credibility, and the EPA makes a lot of training available for people to get familiar with the program,” said Renee Loveland, sustainability manager at Gerding Edlen, one of the nation’s leading real estate investment and development firms. “We’ve been using it over the past several years. All of the other markets we’re currently doing business in have mandatory reporting in place, and Portfolio Manager has been working well for our properties.”

Why are cities like Portland adopting energy performance reporting for commercial buildings?

  • The energy used to power buildings is the largest source of carbon pollution in Portland.
  • Similar to a MPG rating for a car, the energy performance policy allows potential tenants and owners to have access to important information about building energy performance.
  • Commercial energy reporting policies in 12 other U.S. cities have proven to motivate investment in efficiency improvements that save money and reduce carbon emissions.


“This has been a great collaboration among City bureaus and community members, including dozens of building owners and managers,” said Bureau of Planning and Sustainability Director Susan Anderson. “This isn't new. It's tried and true — and already has been adopted in 12 other U.S. cities."

Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/energyreporting to learn more and track program updates.


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Portland City Council approves new goals for Sustainable City Government operations

City bureaus model sustainable principles and practices and save long-term operating costs

Portland City Council approved a new set of Sustainable City Government Principles and an update to the Green Building Policy for City Facilities. Together, these resolutions will guide city bureaus to implement long-term operational efficiencies with a focus on sustainable approaches.

“City bureaus have a long track record of sustainability, but it’s important that we periodically revisit our policies and goals, and push ourselves to continue to look for innovative solutions,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales.

Council passed a resolution to update the City’s green building requirements for facilities that the City owns and manages. Building green reflects the City’s commitment to saving natural resources, while creating healthy spaces for workers and visitors. It also helps the City save money on energy, water, waste and stormwater management.

“From solar installations to recycling to energy efficiency lighting — all City of Portland bureaus are making government operations more cost and resource efficient,” said BPS Director Susan Anderson. “Cities from around the world look to Portland as a leader. Local residents and businesses have invested in resource efficiency, and it's essential that City bureaus walk the talk, too."

The City owns and operates hundreds of buildings, tens of thousands of streetlights and traffic signals and several large-scale industrial plants. Like businesses and other organizations, it must examine every facet of operations for possible energy, resource and cost saving opportunities. Portland adopted the first set of sustainability principles in 1994, a year after Portland released the first-in-the-nation local Climate Action Plan. Through implementation of the first set of principles, the City has saved more than $50 million over 20 years.

"Incorporating sustainability into our operations and our culture helps us improve our operations and service to the public," said Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat. "We are making differences large and small, in everyday projects and all our operations. By converting street lights to energy-saving LEDs, we are saving dollars and energy in virtually all neighborhoods in the city. We also have turned the leaves collected last fall as part of Leaf Day service into compost that is now available for sale to the public. These principles will help us achieve even more. We support these principles because they're the right thing to do and because they make sense operationally."

In recent years, bureaus have partnered to achieve impressive savings projects, including:

  • Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) sustainability-related projects are saving dollars through lower electricity bills and reduced maintenance costs. PBOT is currently converting 54,000 street lights to Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting. This conversion will result in a savings of 20 million kilowatt-hours of electricity – cutting energy use in half and saving $2 million annually. The new LEDs are expected to last up to 20 years without changing bulbs or major maintenance. 
  • Portland’s fire bureau has been making stations more efficient and healthier for over a decade, including two LEED buildings.
  • Portland Parks and Recreation is the first and only park system in the country certified for salmon-friendly parks management. The bureau makes energy efficiency improvements a priority as a routine part of the ongoing work for the Parks Replacement Bond.
  • The Office of Management and Finance’s sustainable procurement program is 13 years old and has received national and international attention. OMF also manages the City Fleet, which will be 20 percent electric by 2030.
  • Today, approximately 44 percent of City-controlled impervious surfaces are managed via sustainable stormwater strategies like green street projects. The Portland Bureau of Environmental Services has overseen the construction of over 2,000 green street facilities since 2006. BES staff at Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant have reduced electricity consumption by 40 percent. In 1991, power use was at 30 million kilowatt-hours; in 2015, the number was roughly 18 million kWh. One of the more exciting future initiatives at the plant is to use surplus biogas and make it suitable for use as a transportation fuel. This kind of innovation brings cost savings and significant carbon and emission reductions for the community.
  • “We talk about ‘Healthy Parks, Healthy Portland,’ which means building, maintaining, and operating our parks and recreation system in order to promote ecological health,” said Portland Parks & Recreation Director Mike Abbaté. “Portland Parks & Recreation enthusiastically supports the new Sustainable City Government Principles, and looks forward to participating in the City’s national green leadership.”

These resolutions renew and refresh Portland’s longstanding commitment to walk its talk when it comes to sustainability.

www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/scg

Project contact

Pam Neild, Sustainable City Government Partnership Program Coordinator
pam.neild@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-0231
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