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New Zoning Map goes to Planning and Sustainability Commission

Community members invited to testify on Composite Zoning Map at public hearing on July 12

City Council may have adopted the 2035 Comprehensive Plan last week, but there’s still more work to be done to implement it. Next up is a Composite Zoning Map, which incorporates new zoning from several Early Implementation projects.

The Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) has held public hearings for all of the implementation projects making updates to the Zoning Map, including employment land, campus institutions, residential and open spaces, and mixed use zones. These projects were created to address the most urgent needs to implement Portland’s new long-range plan for growth and development.

New “Composite” Zoning Map
Now all of the Zoning Map updates have been combined into one “Composite” Zoning Map. You can view the new map by visiting the online Map App.

The PSC will invite testimony on the Composite Zoning Proposal at a public hearing on July 12, 2016.

Planning and Sustainability Commission Public Hearing
Composite Zoning Map
Tuesday, July 12, 2016, 4 p.m. 
Portland Building
1120 SW 5th Avenue, Room C

Check the PSC Calendar one week prior to the scheduled hearing to confirm the date, time and location. Learn how to testify to the PSC; read Tips for Effective Testimony.

The PSC also invites testimony on this proposal through July 12, 2016, in writing:

  • Via the Map App: Testify on specific proposals by location through the Map App.
  • By Email: psc@portlandoregon.gov.
  • By U.S. Mail: 
    Planning and Sustainability Commission
    City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
    1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201
    Attn: Composite Zoning Map testimony

Note: All testimony to the PSC is considered public record, and testifiers' name, address and any other information included in the testimony will be posted on the website.

Next steps

Following the PSC’s public hearing, the Commission will hold a work session on August 2, 2016, and recommend a new Zoning Map to City Council, which will hold additional hearings in the fall.

What’s the difference between the Comprehensive Plan Map and the Zoning Map?

The Comprehensive Plan Map depicts a long-term vision of how and where the city will grow and change over the next 20 years to accommodate anticipated population and job growth. The Zoning Map tells us how land can be used and what can be built on any given property today

For more information, visit the project website: www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/compositezoning

 

 

City seeking input on ideas to revitalize the Eastbank Crescent and provide a public beach along the Willamette

Design ideas for the Eastbank Crescent and the Central City Potential Swimming Beach Study shared at open house on June 29 at the PCC CLIMB Center

The Willamette River has often been referred to as Portland’s front yard. Actually, it’s more like our own lake, swimming pool or beach, with potential to attract and accommodate even more sunbathers, swimmers, boaters, kayakers and water lovers of all kinds.

The City of Portland is studying how to create a vibrant public space along the Willamette, with improved fish and wildlife habitat. Planners are looking at the Eastbank Crescent, the riverfront site between the Hawthorne and Marquam Bridges just north of OMSI. The area includes the Holman Dock, a launch for multiple rowing and paddling clubs and popular with sunbathers in summer months. The dock is in disrepair and needs to be replaced, providing an opportunity to synchronize planning, clean up and repair efforts.

River attracts multiple users

The river is shallow here, drawing swimmers in addition to boaters. The shallow water, rare for the Central City, also presents an opportunity to improve habitat for multiple species of fish. The heavily used Greenway Trail traverses the site, with several confusing crossings and conflict points between cyclists, pedestrians and boaters carrying sculls.

To ensure public access to the river, a new dock, habitat restoration and trail improvements are coordinated and create a cohesive, well-functioning public space, the City is developing the Eastbank Crescent Riverfront Plan.

Swimming Study

Portland’s improved wastewater and stormwater runoff system has made the Willamette River much cleaner and safer for swimming. Consequently, more residents want access into and on the river. So the City is looking at five shallow-water sites along the river in the Central City, including the Eastbank Crescent, to determine if there is a suitable location for a family-friendly public beach.

Design ideas for the Eastbank Crescent and the Central City Swimming Beach Study will be presented for comment and feedback at a public open house on Wednesday, June 29 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the PCC CLIMB Center. Please note that parking lot fees will be waived. Visit Tri-Met’s Trip Planner at http://trimet.org/#planner to plan your route

For more information visit the project website or contact Lori Grant at lori.grant@portlandoregon.gov.

Sustainable Summer in the City Facebook Photo Contest

Share photos from your favorite Portland summer moments!

From Sunday Parkways and Movies in the Park to Farmers Markets and neighborhood street fairs, Portland is full of free and fun happenings all summer long.

Having a no-waste picnic with friends? Enjoying an urban hike? Getting your hands dirty in a community garden?

 

Share your favorite Sustainable Summer in the City moments with us! 

How many of these activities are already on your summer fun list?

  • Bike rides — anywhere, everywhere, all the time. Costumes encouraged!
  • Community gardening.
  • A no-waste picnic with friends with reusable dishware.
  • Planting trees.
  • Green DIY arts and crafts projects with kids.
  • Hosting a free sale, participating in a clothing swap or joining a sharing library.
  • Neighborhood litter cleanups.
  • Hiking in Portland parks like Forest Park or Mount Tabor.
  • Music events in community gathering spaces.
  • Paddling the Willamette River.
  • Urban hikes — get to know a new neighborhood on foot.
  • Celebrations in your certified Backyard Habitat.

Capture the moment with a photo and share it with us!

You’ll be entered into a drawing for prizes that increase the green in your day-to-day, long after the last summer sun sets.

Prizes:

5 winners will receive a Gardener's Delight package: a kitchen compost pail and liners, a bag of organic compost, organic seeds for your garden and other fun gardening goodies.

Enter to win:

  1. Complete the super simple entry form and submit your photo.
  2. Like the BPS Facebook page (www.facebook.com/PortlandBPS)
  3. Download and sign this photo release form and email, mail or fax it to us.  

Contest rules:

  1. Contest takes place from June 20, 2016 —  August 20, 2016.
  2. Five winners will be randomly drawn and announced on Facebook on August 26, 2016.
  3. Photos must be submitted by a person 18 years of age or older.
  4. Winners will be notified by email.
  5. Photo submissions will be posted to BPS' Facebook page once a photo release is on file.
    Email: curbsider@portlandoregon.gov 
    Mail: Curbsider Facebook Contest 1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100,  Portland, OR 97201  
    Fax: 503-823-7800.
  6. Photos that violate the Social Media host's terms of use or the City of Portland's Social Media Policy will be not be posted or eligible for entry into the drawing.

 

It’s 2035. What did the new Comprehensive Plan deliver?

Imagine … 20 years from now, what would Portland look like guided by our new long range plan for a prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient city?

A little more than 35 years ago, Portland welcomed its first Comprehensive Plan, a blue print for the city that would be admired around the world in the decades to come. In 1980, the population of Portland was 366,000, a little more than half of what it is today.

Back then, Mt St Helens had just erupted, and Supertramp and Donna Summers were all the rage. Smart phones were only on Star Trek, Microsoft had just 11 employees, and a kid could ride a bike without a helmet and get away with it.

Portlanders banded together into neighborhood associations to block the Mt Hood Freeway and ensured those transportation dollars would go toward the construction of the MAX blue line. A downtown parking lot was transformed into Pioneer Square, and the Harbor Freeway into Tom McCall Waterfront Park. And Portland’s 1980 Comp Plan directed population and employment growth into a series of “nodes and noodles.”

The rest is history.

Fast forward to 2035 ... Nodes and noodles have become “centers and corridors,” and Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan has helped a mid-sized city grow up. Portland has become a place where most people can live healthy lives, with access to good jobs, safe streets and bikeways, affordable housing, clean air and water, walkable neighborhoods, quality transit service and beautiful parks.

The 2035 Comp Plan built upon the best of Portland’s strong planning heritage, advanced a more equitable approach to neighborhood development and leveraged Portland’s rapid growth to balance prosperity, human and environmental health, equity and resilience.

Imagine 20 years from now …

… a Portland that has nearly a quarter of million new people living here. Places like Hollywood, the Jade District, North Pearl, and Barbur and Powell Boulevards will be high-functioning mixed use areas with easy access to transit and a range of housing types to meet the needs of smaller households, Portlanders who want to age in place, and an increasingly diverse population.

Imagine …

… a city with 140,000 more jobs. More middle-wage jobs and a balanced economy fueled by the preservation of industrial land, expansion of our colleges and hospitals, a robust Central City, and flourishing smaller businesses in centers and corridors.

… better transit with new routes throughout East Portland, connecting more residents with their jobs; and fewer cars on the road, creating more room for freight, bikes and pedestrians.

… healthier people who have easy, safe and pleasant routes to walk, bike or take transit.

… and a safer and more resilient Portland with well-maintained infrastructure.

Most of Portland’s diverse population would live in complete, healthy and safe neighborhoods, close to the amenities they need. Tens of thousands more well-paying jobs would offer residents financial security and a pathway to wealth. Increased housing options would make it possible for individuals and families to create households to their liking. And a robust transit system and greenway network would offer multiple transportation options for Portlanders to get to and from work, as well as other places they want to go.

Sound crazy? It’s not. If the 1980 Comp Plan could transform a city suffering from suburban flight and crumbling infrastructure into a destination city for tourists as well as newcomers looking for a place to call home … it’s entirely possible that the 2035 Comp Plan — built on the success of previous planning efforts and created with the benefit of more data and public involvement, and inspired by so many other forward-thinking cities — could successfully guide Portland well into the mid-21st century.

Thank you!

With the adoption of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan by City Council on June 15, 2016, Portland's long range plan for a prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient Portland is on its way to the state for acknowledgement. And, thus, a reality.

Many thanks to the tens of thousands of community members who contributed to the plan. Just as with the 1980 Comp Plan, your contributions will be appreciated for generations to come.        

Your stuff matters! Including stuff you no longer want or need

Free online tools and resources to help you find a new home for practically anything you want to toss.

clean up

Portland has many creative ways to donate usable items to neighbors and organizations. These online tools make it easy for you to reuse, borrow and share stuff you longer want or need.

Many groups and organizations are free and offer Portland-area residents simple ways to move useful materials through the community and into the hands of others who need them.

Metro has compiled a helpful list of charitable organizations you can contact for pick up or drop off usable items.

Here are a few other resources to get you started:

Freecycle
Freecycle is a grassroots movement committed to a sharing economy and helping people give and gain cool free stuff. It promotes reuse and keeping usable items out of landfills.

Paying it Forward Store
The Paying it Forward Store helps those in immediate need of clothing, coats and shoes and connects to other like-minded organizations by collecting and distributing donated items.

PDX Free Store
The PDX Free Store is like a rummage sale except everything is free—clothes, housewares, music, toys and games. Bring clean, working items to donate—take home items you need.

Rooster
Rooster is a community of neighbors who share resources at no cost. It’s about borrowing things you need—and making rewarding connections in your community. Learn more about Rooster.

Nextdoor
Nextdoor is a tool for getting helpful recommendations and resources from neighbors in addition to borrowing, donating or selling items.  

Buy Nothing Project
Buy Nothing Project members post anything you’d like to give away, lend or share. It is neighborhood- and Facebook-based, focused on items you’d like to borrow or acquire, at no cost, from neighbors.

Have unusable bulky items?
Your garbage and recycling company can remove large items that are not reusable or recyclable for an extra charge. Call your company a week in advance and they will give you a cost estimate. For a reasonable charge, they will pick up appliances, furniture, large branches, stumps and other big items. For curbside pickup, set bulky items at your curb on the day your garbage and recycling company has agreed to pick them up. 

For discarded items abandoned in your neighborhood contact the Metro Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Patrol or call 503-234-3000.

Disclaimer: Neither BPS nor any of its partners endorse a particular business, company or any organization through the Curbsider Blog. Read the full disclaimer.