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Solarize Portland extends deadline to May 15th

BPS E-News Issue 11

The price goes down when more neighbors join in! While Neighbors West-Northwest and North Portland Neighborhood Services have recruited over 275 homeowners in North and Northwest Portland for a bulk purchase of solar electric systems for their homes, and they want even more neighbors to sign up. The registration deadline for these Solarize Portland campaigns has been extended to May 15, 2011.

Free workshops makes going solar easy and affordable

Solarize Portland neighborhood projects are designed to simplify the process of going solar and bring cost reductions through volume purchasing. Free workshops make the process easy to understand, by covering topics such as the size of system to purchase, budgeting and financing, and how to get started.

 

About Neighbors West-Northwest Coalition

The Neighbors West-Northwest Coalition (NWNW) promotes direct participation in grassroots democracy by supporting community efforts at the neighborhood level. Our services advance the voices of our constituent Neighborhood Associations as they strive to create livable, sustainable and equitable communities. www.nwnw.org

About North Portland Neighborhood Services

North Portland Neighborhood Services (NPNS), located in the Historic Kenton Firehouse, is the neighborhood office that serves residents in the 11 neighborhood associations in the North Portland district. www.npnscommunity.org

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BPS News: Public Place Recycling Starts in Downtown Portland

New downtown recycling containers reduce waste and help citizens make sustainable choices on the go

CONTACT
Jocelyn Boudreaux
Bureau of Planning & Sustainability
503-823-3660
jocelyn.boudreaux@portlandoregon.gov

April 13, 2011

 

Public place recycling starts in downtown Portland

New downtown recycling containers reduce waste and help citizens make sustainable choices on the go

Portland, Ore. --  Today, the City of Portland unveiled Public Place Recycling, making recycling a simple and easy option for downtown commuters, residents, and visitors. In this first phase of a multi-year project, the City is installing 175 recycling containers on the downtown Portland transit mall. One recycling container will be installed next to each garbage can along Fifth and Sixth Avenues, between Northwest Irving and Southwest Jackson Streets. As part of the Portland Recycles! Plan adopted by City Council in 2007, Public Place Recycling aims to reduce the amount of waste in public garbage cans, while bringing sustainable options to public spaces.


“Public Place Recycling is an important step toward our goal of increasing our city-wide recycling rate to 75 percent by 2015,” said Mayor Sam Adams. “Installing these new recycling containers next to garbage cans along the transit mall will make it easy and convenient to recycle downtown.”


With recyclable materials making up approximately 30 percent of the waste collected from downtown public garbage cans, the recycling containers have the potential to divert nearly a third of the downtown public waste from the landfill. The recycling containers will be paired with and match existing garbage cans and each will have separate areas for newspapers and magazines, plastic bottles, metal cans and glass bottles. Non-recyclable items include coffee cups, cold beverage cups, food wrappers and food packaging.


"Bringing the City's recycling efforts to the Portland transit mall will be a great way to blend the City's sustainable priorities into this important public area,” said Bob Hastings, Agency Architect, Tri-Met. “Designed for function and aesthetics, these recycling containers will encourage the public to recycle, while enhancing the usability of the transit mall."

The City of Portland selected the downtown transit mall for the launch of Public Place Recycling because it is a thriving center of activity and a nationally recognized successful transit center. Partners in the project include the Portland Bureau of Transportation, TriMet and Portland Mall Management, Inc. Once installation of the recycling containers is completed this spring, data will be collected to help ensure that the project is as successful as possible when it eventually expands to other parts of the city.

Watch a new 1-minute promotional video about the recycling containers.

About the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

To create and enhance a vibrant city, BPS combines the disciplines of planning and sustainability to advance Portland’s diverse and distinct neighborhoods, promote a prosperous and low-carbon economy, and help ensure that people and the natural environment are healthy and integrated into the cityscape. BPS provides a forum for community engagement and education, and is a catalyst for action. With a city full of partners, BPS develops creative and practical solutions on issues as far ranging as comprehensive, neighborhood and environmental planning, urban design, waste reduction and recycling, energy efficiency and solar technologies. This innovative, interdisciplinary approach strengthens Portland’s position as an international model of sustainable development practices and commerce. www.portlandonline.com/bps

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BPS News: Citywide Tree Project adopted by City Council

Proposal to ensure tree preservation and planting means Portlanders will benefit from robust tree canopy

BPS News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 13, 2011

 

CONTACT

Robert Jortner

Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

503-823-7855

roberta.jortner@portlandoregon.gov

Eden Dabbs
Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
503-823-9908

eden.dabbs@portlandoregon.gov


Citywide Tree Project adopted by City Council

Proposal to ensure tree preservation and planting means Portlanders will benefit from robust tree canopy

Portland, ORE. -- Today, the Portland City Council unanimously adopted milestone legislation to protect and enhance Portland's urban forest. Three years in the making, the Citywide Tree Project streamlines and strengthens the City's requirements around trees.


"The Tree Project has been a journey," proclaimed Mayor Sam Adams. "Thanks to our community's tenacity, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability's leadership and critical assistance from other city bureaus, dozens of disparate viewpoints have been woven into a cohesive framework for the future of our trees." 


Commissioner Nick Fish called the Tree Project "an historic opportunity for Portland to ensure the future of our urban tree canopy. We are all partners in protecting and managing this vital natural resource. Trees provide significant economic and environmental benefits to our community."


Led by the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, multiple City bureaus and community stakeholders tackled tough policy questions and tradeoffs to produce the proposal presented to Portland's Planning Commission and Urban Forestry Commission last year, and then later to the City Council.


"The process was unique," observed Bonny McKnight, Citywide Land Use Group Chair and member of the project Stakeholder Discussion Group. "The Citywide Tree Policy development took place through an effective and - by normal standards - rapid collaboration of many City bureaus to find rules that could be combined, eliminated, clarified and ultimately simplified into a single, understandable [code] (Title 11 - Trees)."
 
The result is a cohesive regulatory framework, designed to support City goals for tree canopy and healthy watersheds, smart urban development and neighborhood livability. Portland's new tree rules will encourage preservation of large healthy trees and ensure that trees are routinely planted as new development takes place.  The project also standardizes and streamlines the City's tree removal and pruning permit requirements, making them more consistent, fair and user-friendly.


"Trees are an essential part of having a vibrant city. They help clean our air and water, as well as keep us cool in the summer," stated Bureau of Environmental Services Director Dean Marriott. "The new tree code provides a great step forward as the community tries to grow more trees and protect the ones we have."
 
Commissioner Amanda Fritz noted that, "This is landmark legislation. Trees are the landmarks in our neighborhoods, and the regulations we are adopting provide landmark protections. So Portlanders will continue to enjoy the many benefits of big beautiful trees for generations to come."
 
As active participants in the project, the development community sought balance in the new tree rules. "The Home Builders Association appreciates the collaborative effort with the other stakeholders and the City of Portland to develop a tree policy that created a workable, fair and consistent system for housing development," said Dave Nielson, executive director of Home Builders Association of Metro Portland. "The final result was one that places equal importance on infill homes and a healthy tree canopy."


City Council also directed a set of actions to improve customer service and public access to tree-related information and programs. These include a new single point of contact for the public, a 24-hour tree hotline, an updated tree permit tracking system, and development of a Community Tree Manual.


Commissioner Dan Saltzman noted that, "Completing this phase of the work is an important step, but success will ultimately be measured in terms of more trees across Portland, and community confidence in our ability to implement and enforce the rules."
 
Said Bob Sallinger, conservation director for the Audubon Society of Portland, "This is a huge step forward for our environment and our community. The Tree Project directs the City to protect, educate and enforce as needed to sustain and expand our urban canopy. Portland's trees are an incredible asset, and the costs associated with this approach represent smart, strategic and proactive investments in the City's green infrastructure."


The Tree Project components will be phased in over three years so staff can prepare to implement the new codes, while providing information to developers, arborists and Portland residents.


For more information about the Citywide Tree Project, please visit www.portlandonline.com/bps/treeproject
 
About the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability


To create and enhance a vibrant city, BPS combines the disciplines of planning and sustainability to advance Portland's diverse and distinct neighborhoods, promote a prosperous and low-carbon economy, and help ensure that people and the natural environment are healthy and integrated into the cityscape. BPS provides a forum for community engagement and education, and is a catalyst for action. With a city full of partners, BPS develops creative and practical solutions on issues as far ranging as comprehensive, neighborhood and environmental planning, urban design, waste reduction and recycling, energy efficiency and solar technologies. This innovative, interdisciplinary approach strengthens Portland's position as an international model of sustainable development practices and commerce. www.portlandonline.com/bps
 
 

Transportation Charrette Traffics in Good Ideas From Public

Recent news from the NNE Quadrant Project!

Thank you to all who participated in the Freeway/Local Transportation Charrette held April 11-13! Over 50 people attended one or more of three public sessions. The project team received more than 40 ideas for improving I-5 and the local street system surrounding the Broadway/Weidler Interchange.

N/NE Freeway CharretteN/NE Freeway Charrette

During the charrette, the project team and consultants grouped ideas by common elements or "themes" and developed preliminary sketches that illustrate how they could play out on the ground. These preliminary freeway concepts will be presented at a subcommittee meeting on April 20 (see calendar).

Next steps will be to further refine the freeway project and integrate it with preliminary land use concepts developed in February. See the summary of the Land Use Charrette for more information on that event and the resulting work products.

Questions or comments? Email the project team at NNEQuadrant@portlandoregon.gov.

Symposium Explores Civic and Cultural Life

CC2035 Civic and Cultural Life Symposiums are moving forward with good discussions for Portland's Central City.

The culture of the Central City is alive and thriving! At the most recent symposium held on April 8th there were 20 panelists on hand to discuss what factors have led to this vibrant cultural life, and what needs to be done to sustain it for the next 25 years. It was agreed that in spite of all of the exciting art and culture being created that there is much to be done both now and for the future. The second Civic and Cultural Life symposium will be held on April 28th.

A few key issues for the future taken from the symposium:

  • Accessibility for all current and future residents
  • Good public places and how they encourage liveliness in the city.
  • Affordability to retain and attract artists.
  • Synergy within the artistic and cultural communities to enable collaboration.
  • Potential assets and cultural institutions to complement places such as the Rose Garden, Pioneer Square, OMSI and Saturday Market, among others.

Central City 2035 (CC2035) seeks to ensure a vibrant civic and cultural life through good planning. The second Civic and Cultural Life symposium on April 28th will build upon what was discussed and explore how potential policies would translate to distinct areas within the Central City.

The results from these two symposiums will be incorporated in the development of the draft Concept Plan for CC2035, and is one of the integrated themes under discussion about the Central City. Materials from previous and upcoming symposiums (when available) can be found in the Current Documents section of the website.

For any questions or comments contact Elisa Hamblin at 503-823-9714 or by email at elisa.hamblin@portlandoregon.gov.

The CC2035 team will make reasonable accommodation for people with disabilities. Please notify us no fewer than five (5) business days prior to the event by phone 503-823-7700, by the TTY line at 503-823-6868 or by the Oregon Relay Service at 1-800-735-2900.