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Manufacturing Business Profile: Pitman Building Kitchens and Pitman Restaurant Equipment

Veteran kitchen supplier evolves to cater to Portland’s growing commercial food industry.

Pitman Restaurant Equipment has been a fixture in the Central Eastside for decades. Owners Dan and Jason Pitman have been “doing kitchens” for 28 years and boast several locations in Southeast Portland. The latest addition to their suite of food-related businesses is the Pitman Building, a new type of industrial building at SE 3rd and Clay, with six commercial kitchens and nine small office spaces above. Because of the industrial zoning, the office spaces must be primarily used by the kitchen tenants or other industrial businesses.

Open since early 2013, the Pitman Building’s kitchen spaces are fully occupied by commercial food production companies with 3 to 10 employees each, including Aybla Mediterranean Grill and Artemis Foods. Based on this success, Dan Pitman has embarked on another project: rehabbing an old warehouse building on SE Water Avenue to accommodate three more commercial kitchens and office space on the second floor.

Pitman says the businesses that rent his kitchens “. . . tend to be start-ups and/or caterers, food carts and wholesale food producers that sell to Whole Foods and New Seasons — places that like to buy local.”

All of these businesses plan to grow, Pitman notes, and to that end he provides some marketing support. Ratagast cat food (fresh frozen cat food), for example, was a tenant and is now a national brand.

He originally located his restaurant supply business in the district because of the central location, and Dick’s Restaurant Supply (now Rose’s) offered “some friendly competition.” They often refer customers to one another. “The area works,” states Pitman “because a lot of the businesses here serve Downtown, and access to the freeway isn’t too bad.”

But freight and parking are issues. Getting the big trucks in and out of the area can be challenging, and Pitman speculates that it will probably get worse. Tenants and employees buy monthly parking permits to free up their parking lot for deliveries and customers, but on-street parking is becoming scarce.

“Ultimately, though, I think the change in the district is positive,” he says. “Change is good.”

This is the fifth installment of a blog series aimed at exploring the past, present, and future of the Central Eastside. To learn more about the businesses of the Central Eastside and the planning efforts for the district, read the Central Eastside Reader and visit the SE Quadrant Plan calendar to learn about future events.

Transportation systems, open space, the Willamette River and land use are focus of two-day planning charrette in June

Join the SE Quadrant Stakeholder Advisory Committee to guide the future of Portland’s Central Eastside

Example of a Charrette map
Drawing on maps is just one way community members can provide specific feedback for the area. This example is from the Summer 2013 Inner Southeast Station Area Charrette.

On Tuesday and Wednesday (June 3 – 4) the City of Portland is hosting a two-day planning charrette for the SE Quadrant Plan. This event will gather public input to shape the future of this unique part of the Central City.

But what’s a charrette? A Charrette is an intense period of design or planning activity. Often used to bring together multiple stakeholders during one timeframe, a successful charrette will generate many ideas and promote joint ownership of solutions.

Interested community members are invited to join the project’s Stakeholder Advisory Committee (SAC) during this intensive planning exercise. You can participate in discussions and mapping exercises about areas and topics throughout the district.

Day 1 (June 3) will focus on creating detailed concepts for the entire district, with individual breakout sessions for the following areas:

  • Breakout A: Southern Triangle
  • Breakout B: Mixed Use Corridors, including the East Portland Grand Avenue Historic District
  • Breakout C: Industrial Heartland
  • Breakout D: Riverfront & Public Open Space

Day 2 (June 4) will focus on strategies for implementing these concepts. Breakout E in the morning will cover the transportation network and public infrastructure to support the district concepts. Rough districtwide alternatives will be developed during Breakout F in the afternoon. A detailed agenda has been posted on the SAC Documents page.

The entire two-day charrette will be summarized at the SAC meeting Thursday night (June 5). Committee members will then have a chance to discuss the results as a group and shape the development of land use alternatives. 

Upcoming Meetings


Southeast Quadrant Charrette
Day 1 – Tuesday, June 3, 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Day 2 – Wednesday, June 4, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Bureau of Planning & Sustainability, Room 7A
1900 SW 4th Ave (7th floor)
Topics: Land use, river, open space and transportation systems

SAC Meeting #7
Thursday, June 5, 2014, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Cascade Energy 3rd floor meeting room
Eastside Exchange, 123 NE 3rd Ave
Topics: Charrette results, discussion and input to shape land use alternatives 

Southeast Quadrant Open House
Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Location to be determined
Topics: Presentation of draft districtwide alternatives 

SAC Meeting #8
Thursday, July 10, 2014, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Location to be determined
Topics: Finalize alternatives, discuss policy concepts

All SAC meetings are open to the public and will include public comment periods. Meeting materials are posted approximately one week before meetings in the SAC Documents.

City Council to Hold June 4 Public Hearing on RICAP 6

Recommended Draft includes amendments to short-term rental regulations

The Portland City Council will hold a public hearing on the Regulatory Improvement Code Amendment Package 6 (RICAP 6) Recommended Draft on June 4, beginning at 2 p.m. Public testimony on short term rentals and many other zoning code amendments will be taken at this time.

The Planning and Sustainability Commission’s Recommended Draft is based on input and testimony received during a 3-month public outreach period and a public hearing on April 22, 2014.

RICAP 6 includes many amendments to the zoning code, including changes that:

  • Allow limited modifications of wireless facilities to conform with federal regulations.
  • Clarify regulations on temporary activities such as construction staging, temporary filming and emergency situations.
  • Extending zoning protections to designated historic resources located in the public right of way.

However, the public is most interested in the new regulations for short term rentals. Testimony on any of the recommended code changes is welcome at the City Council hearing on June 4.

City Council Public Hearing on RICAP 6
Wednesday June 4, 2014, 2 p.m.
City Hall – Council Chambers
1221 SW 4th Ave, Portland Oregon

View the Recommended Draft: www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/490955
View the Hearing Notice: www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/490957

For instructions on the City Council Hearing and submitting testimony: www.portlandonline.com/auditor/index.cfm?c=26979

Mixed Use Zones Project: Revising zoning to support vibrant neighborhoods in centers and corridors

You’re invited to share your thoughts during upcoming neighborhood walks

NE Broadway walkPortland is made up of more than 90 neighborhoods, many of which have bustling centers or streets where people can shop, eat, work, play and take transit to jobs. But not all parts of Portland have these kinds of amenities or access to public transportation.

The city’s new proposed Comprehensive Plan is focused on creating more of these thriving, healthy and connected neighborhoods throughout the city, in part by targeting housing and job growth in Portland’s centers and corridors.  Zoning regulations will need to support these functions, as well as promote pedestrian-friendly streets and sidewalks; create desirable places to live, work and visit; and address the needs of nearby residential areas.

The Mixed Use Zones Project (MUZ) will revise the zoning code for commercial and mixed use zones to help create more vibrant centers and corridors. The project is part of Task 5: Implementation for the Comprehensive Plan Update.

To better understand current conditions, issues and community aspirations, the project team has been leading a series of community walks. Community members are invited on these walks to share ideas for how zoning regulations can be refined to help make better places. Your feedback will help staff see zoning issues through a local lens.

We want to know:

  • What’s working well or not so well regarding new development?
  • How can zoning code regulations help support a thriving business environment?
  • What building features, scale or site designs will enhance the character of the area?
  • What design features will create a quality environment for future residents?
  • What are appropriate ways of creating transitions in development scale and activity between mixed use development and adjacent residential areas?

Staff, neighbors and community activists have participated in three walks so far. They have discussed zoning and development in/around:

  • NE Broadway from the Lloyd District to Hollywood
  • SE Division around SE 122nd Avenue
  • SE 82nd Avenue around SE Division

For more information, and for full details on upcoming walks, please visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/mixeduse or call 503-823-7700.

Get answers to your share, repair and reuse questions

New partners and a new website offer Portlanders ideas for resourceful living | BPS E-News May 2014

Chinook Book and Reuse Alliance have teamed up with the City to bring you even more fresh ideas and tips to make simple changes in everyday choices. Be Resourceful’s new website offers articles and tips to connect you to local resources that help you save money, cut clutter and conserve natural resources. Find answers to questions such as:

Partners bring new expertise, ideas and audiences

By partnering with Chinook Book and Reuse Alliance of Oregon, Be Resourceful can provide local resources and content so Portland residents can more easily (1) buy smart, (2) reuse, (3) borrow and share and (4) fix and maintain.  

Chinook Book helps residents support local sustainable businesses — and save money — by offering hundreds of coupons from local merchants selected for their commitment to protecting the environment and giving back to the community.

Reuse Alliance is building a community of like-minded individuals and organizations across the country that is revolutionizing the way we look at waste. By partnering with Be Resourceful, the Oregon chapter of Reuse Alliance is helping to connect local government, businesses and residents with resources for choosing reuse options that challenge traditional patterns of consumption.

 

be resourceful websiteFIND IDEAS FOR MAKING SIMPLE CHANGES IN EVERYDAY CHOICES

www.resourcefulpdx.com