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PSC News: July 28, 2015 Meeting Recap

R/W #7792 Street Vacation — hearing / recommendation; Powell-Division Transit and Development Project — briefing; Community Involvement Report — briefing; Comprehensive Plan — work session / recommendation


  • R/W #7792 Street Vacation — hearing / recommendation
  • Powell-Division Transit and Development Project — briefing
  • Community Involvement Committee — briefing
  • Comprehensive Plan — work session / recommendation

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at

City Council Holds First Public Hearing on SE Quadrant Plan

Second hearing on July 29 will allow more people a chance to testify

City Hall

On Wednesday, July 8, 2015, City Council held its first public hearing on the SE Quadrant Plan (full video; click on July 8, PM in the left hand navigation bar). Members of the SE Quadrant Stakeholder Advisory Committee, business owners, land owners and representatives from nonprofits spoke about the plan’s strengths and how it could be improved. There was broad support for the plan's balance between supporting the growth of the district while reinforcing protections for industrial businesses.

Transportation strategies affirmed

Representatives from two of Portland’s three modal advisory committees ― the Portland Freight Committee and Bicycle Advisory Committee ― testified in support of the plan. In addition to reaffirming the freight and bicycle designations in the existing Transportation System Plan and Bike Master Plan, the SE Quadrant Plan proposes enhancing separate routes for freight trucks and bikes to improve safety and comfort for each. Their support was echoed by the Central Eastside Industrial Council (CEIC).

Property owners and neighborhood associations expressed enthusiasm for the Central Eastside portion of the Green Loop, if conflicts with freight operations can be addressed. The Green Loop is a signature urban design concept that would provide a safe and comfortable pedestrian and bike route around the Central City and link open spaces, tree canopy and pedestrian amenities.

Land use tools for small businesses and craft manufacturers

As at the Planning and Sustainability Commission hearing, the majority of testimony at City Council supported the expansion of the Employment Opportunity Subarea (EOS) throughout the rest of the district. Staff believe that expanding the EOS will create more locations for industrial businesses currently competing for limited real estate in the Central Eastside. Increasing the supply of this type of land should lower demand and stabilize lease rates for all sectors as a result.

At the hearing, a longtime business and property owner in the Central Eastside asked Council to ensure that traditional industry is a priority in the plan. And two members of the Portland Made group asked commissioners to consider the impacts of the EOS proposal on Portland’s growing craft manufacturing community. Based on this input, Councilors are crafting amendments to the plan that will be discussed at the upcoming hearing (details below).

Second City Council hearing

Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 2 p.m.
Portland City Council
Council Chambers (City Hall, 2nd Floor)
1221 SW 4th Avenue

Members of the public are invited to propose further amendments for Council’s consideration.

  • Those who signed up but were unable to testify at the July 8 hearing will be invited to speak first at the hearing.
  • Those who testified at the July 8 meeting will only be able to testify on new amendments to the plan, which will be published on this website prior to the hearing.

Residential Infill Project recruiting members for Stakeholder Advisory Committee

Portlanders sought to represent their communities and neighborhoods to advise City staff on new development standards in single-dwelling residential areas.

In just about every neighborhood in Portland, residents are seeing older homes going down and new – often larger – homes going up in their place.

While not a new phenomenon, demolition and infill have been on the upswing in Portland as the economy improves and builders try to meet the increased demand for all types of housing. In 2014, approximately 300 demolition permits were submitted, or roughly one a day. That’s about a .2 percent annual replacement rate, which is comparable to other cities nationwide. While fewer than half the homes are replaced by two or more houses, the average size of replacement homes is about 2,000 square feet, or nearly twice the size of its predecessor.

What is being done?

In response to community concerns, Mayor Charlie Hales initiated the Residential Infill Project to ensure that new or remodeled houses are well integrated and complement the fabric of neighborhoods. The project will evaluate the city’s single-dwelling development standards and focus on three main topics: scale of houses, narrow lot development and alternative housing options.

How to get involved

In addition to an inclusive public outreach and engagement process, the project will be guided by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee (SAC) comprised of neighborhood representatives along with other individuals and organization representatives having interests, skills, knowledge and expertise in the areas of residential construction, affordable housing, architecture, urban design, historic preservation, real estate and financing, alternative forms of housing, social and housing services, and sustainable development.

The City is looking for Portlanders to serve on the Residential Infill Project Stakeholder Advisory Committee.

If you are interested, please visit the SAC webpage for more information about committee member roles, responsibilities, selection process and timeline. A Statement of Interest must be submitted no later than August 7, 2015 to:


U.S. Mail:

Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
c/o Residential Infill SAC
1900 SW 4th Avenue, Suite 7100
Portland, OR 97201

The SAC will meet throughout the 18-month long project, starting in September with twice monthly meetings through the end of the year. After that it will meet less frequently as the project transitions to drafting and adopting regulations through a public legislative process. SAC members will be asked to help to share discussions and updates with their respective networks as well as assist at public events.

About the project

By 2035, Portland will be home to 123,000 more households. While most of these new housing units will be in mixed use centers and corridors, approximately 20 percent of these new homes are expected to be single-dwelling attached or detached houses.

The Residential Infill Project will address the scale, size, mass and location of new single-family construction to help protect the unique character of Portland’s treasured neighborhoods. But it will also look at smaller forms of housing (skinny houses, stacked flats, cottages, etc.) to ensure that where they are allowed, these more affordable forms of housing reflect the desired character of the single-dwelling zones. 

Does this plastic go in the blue roll cart?

Yogurt style tubs and bottles with a neck are just two of the many plastic items that are accepted at the curb. This illustration helps when you have a plastic item in question.

Hey Portland! You probably know that you can recycle many plastic containers together with paper and metal in the blue recycling roll cart. But not all plastics can be recycled at the curb. In Portland, plastics accepted at the curb are based on SIZE and SHAPE.

Which plastics go in the recycling roll cart?

When in doubt, throw it out or, even better, visit to find a nearby depot that will take these plastics.

Check online for a complete list of what’s accepted in the blue recycling roll cart.