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Comprehensive Plan activity springs forth in April

Film festival, public hearings and concept reports populate the calendar

For those following the Comprehensive Plan, there’s something for everyone this spring. Starting with new concept reports for both the Mixed Use Zones Project and Campus Institutions Project. Both efforts will help implement the new Comprehensive Plan by updating the zoning code in Portland’s growing mixed use centers and corridors, as well as in and around the education and healthcare campuses throughout the city.

These concept documents have evolved over the past several months with lots of input from project advisory committees, open houses and other outreach. The public is now invited to review the drafts and share their feedback with staff.

A public draft of the Campus Institutions Concept is available now for review and comments.

The Mixed Use Zones Concept Report will be released early next month. Sign up to receive project updates here.

In May, planners will begin developing specific zoning code language for these projects. The Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) will receive a briefing from staff on the projects in June and July, before holding public hearings on each one.

Economic Opportunities Analysis

On April 28, the PSC is holding another public hearing on the updated Economic Opportunities Analysis.

Last month, we shared information about the EOA, which is an analysis of employment growth and future land supply.

Read the revised Economic Opportunities Analysis.

Film Festival Shines Light on Local Film Makers

And now for the fun stuff! On Wednesday, April 29, BPS is hosting Portland is Growing: A Festival of Local Films in partnership with the Oregon Chapter of the American Planning Association.

The festival will showcase how Portlanders perceive, experience and benefit from the city’s growth and development. Themes cover demolition and infill, gentrification and displacement, how centers and corridors are awesome, and love letters to the city. Featured films include homegrown videos made with iPhones by Bureau of Planning and Sustainability staff, elegant movies from Oregon Humanities, and everything in between.

Join us at the Kennedy School Gymnasium for a night of moving pictures and storytelling. Light refreshments will be served before the movies start so you can chat with friends and fellow cinephiles. Then, sit back and relax, tuck into the popcorn and watch ‘em roll.

 

Take a look at Portland’s iconic views and notable viewpoints in the updated Scenic Resources Inventory; then tell us what you think

ow through May 31, Portlanders are invited to submit comments on an inventory of some of Portland’s favorite vistas of the Central City

Where do you take your out-of-town visitors to show off Portland? Up to the Washington Park Rose Garden to take in the sweeping, panoramic views of the skyline and Mt Hood? Or maybe you head downtown for a stroll along the waterfront or up to the top of Big Pink for views of the many bridges over the Willamette River. Scenic resources like these help define the character of the Central City and shape the image of Portland and the region.

To help preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of views, viewpoints and scenic corridors within and of the Central City. At 25-years-old, the Central City portion of the Scenic Resources Inventory (CCSRI) is getting a refresh as part of the update of the Central City Plan.

Last summer we asked Portlanders to nominate their favorite views and viewpoints. Those that met a set of criteria were added to the list of existing views and viewpoints from the 1989 SRI as well as new views and viewpoints identified in the field. Staff then put them in a database and subjected each view and viewpoint to rigorous analysis by a team of independent reviewers.

The resulting draft CCSRI includes a mix of scenic resources, including 152 views from 144 viewpoints, 15 view streets, 6 scenic corridors, 22 visual focal points and 5 scenic sites.

Take a Look

The public is invited to review the draft CCSRI to help ensure that all Central City scenic resources are included in the inventory. Did we get them all? Did we miss something? Take a look and tell us what you think.

Public comments on the CCSRI are welcome through May 31, 2015.

How to Comment

Visit the project website for more information about the draft Central City Scenic Resources Inventory and to read specific chapters or download the full draft plan.

Then share your feedback on the draft inventory using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by …

Phone: 503-823-7831

Email to: mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov

Postal mail to:

Mindy Brooks

City of Portland

Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100

Portland, OR 97201

Comments on the draft CCSRI are due by May 31, 2015.

Background and next steps

Scenic resources in Portland have been protected over the past 30 years through various plans and regulations, including the 1983 Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan, 1987 Willamette Greenway Plan and 1991 Scenic Resources Protection Plan.

The purpose of the CCSRI is to provide useful information on the location and quality of existing public scenic resources in and around Portland’s Central City. The inventory includes descriptions, evaluations, photos and maps of public views and viewpoints, scenic corridors, view streets, visual focal points and scenic sites located in the Central City inventory area. The inventory does not make recommendations about which scenic resources should be protected.

The next phase of the project will include an in-depth analysis of the trade-offs involved in protecting — or not protecting — each scenic resource. Staff will consider the effect of building height and massing on significant views as well as alternatives for vegetation management to maintain or enhance scenic resources.

The results of the analysis will be used to draft a scenic resources protection plan for the Central City, which will include staff recommendations of which scenic resources to protect and maintain and what tools to use to implement these recommendations. The scenic resources protection plan will inform updates to the Central City 2035 Plan including changes to zoning regulations and maps. The public will be able to review and comment on the draft CC2035 Plan, including the draft scenic resources protection plan, when the CC2035 Plan is released (currently scheduled for early 2016).

Now through May 31, the public is invited to comment on an inventory of some of Portland’s favorite vistas of the Central City

Take a look at Portland’s iconic views and viewpoints in the updated Central City Scenic Resources Inventory; then tell the City what you think

Where do you take your out-of-town visitors to show off Portland? Up to the Washington Park Rose Garden to take in the sweeping, panoramic views of the skyline and Mt Hood? Maybe you head downtown for a stroll along the waterfront or South Park Blocks. Or take a ride on the Aerial Tram to OHSU for views of the many bridges over the Willamette River, special buildings and scenic landmarks.

Scenic resources like these help define the character of the Central City and shape the image of Portland and the region.

To help preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of public views, viewpoints and other scenic resources within and of the Central City. At 25-years-old, the Central City portion of the Scenic Resources Inventory (CCSRI) is getting a refresh as part of the update of the Central City Plan.

Take a Look
The public is invited to review the draft CCSRI to help ensure that all Central City scenic resources are included in the inventory. Did we get them all? Did we miss something? Take a look and tell us what you think.

Public comments on the CCSRI are welcome through May 31, 2015.

How to Comment
Visit the project website for more information about the draft Central City Scenic Resources Inventory and to read or download specific chapters of the draft inventory.

Then share your feedback on the draft inventory using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by …

  • Phone: 503-823-7831
  • Email to: mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov
  • Postal mail to:

Mindy Brooks
City of Portland
Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100
Portland, OR 97201

Comments on the draft CCSRI are due by May 31, 2015.

Background and next steps
Last summer we asked the public to nominate their favorite views and viewpoints in the Central City. Those that met a set of criteria were added to the list of existing views and viewpoints from the 1989 inventory as well as new scenic resources identified in the field. Staff then put them in a database and subjected each view and viewpoint to rigorous analysis by a team of independent reviewers.
The resulting draft CCSRI includes a mix of scenic resources, including 152 views from 144 viewpoints, 15 view streets, 6 scenic corridors, 22 visual focal points and 5 scenic sites.

The purpose of the CCSRI is to provide useful information on the location and quality of existing public scenic resources in and around Portland’s Central City. The inventory includes descriptions, evaluations, photos and maps of public views and viewpoints, scenic corridors, view streets, visual focal points and scenic sites located in the Central City inventory area. The inventory does not make recommendations about which scenic resources should be protected.

Scenic resources in Portland have been protected over the past 30 years through various plans and regulations, including the 1983 Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan, 1987 Willamette Greenway Plan and 1991 Scenic Resources Protection Plan.

Portland City Council approves energy performance reporting for commercial buildings

Commercial buildings are responsible for nearly a quarter of Portland's carbon emissions and spend more than $335 million on energy every year.

On Earth Day, Portland City Council voted unanimously to approve a new policy that will require owners of commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to track energy use and report it on an annual basis. The policy will cover nearly 80 percent of the commercial square footage and affect approximately 1,000 buildings.

“Portland has set a goal to cut carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. To reach that goal, we all have a role to play — public and private, at work and at home,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. “Reducing energy use in buildings is a critical part of that picture. Tracking energy use and investing in energy efficiency saves money for the building owners. And for the city as a whole. Last year alone, the city saved $6 million on its own energy bills.”

The policy will cover offices, retail spaces, grocery stores, hotels, health care and higher education buildings. It does not include residential properties, nursing homes, and places of worship, parking structures, K-12 schools, industrial facilities or warehouses.

“Today, my clients, tenant customers and staff expect energy efficiency,” said David Genrich, general manager, JLL, a professional services and investment management company specializing in real estate. “Tracking energy use has become a core responsibility of good building managers, and this policy ensures consistency across the board.”

The new Energy Performance Reporting Policy will require commercial buildings to track performance with a free online tool called ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and report energy use information to the City of Portland on an annual basis. There are approximately 5,000 commercial buildings in Portland. Currently fewer than 100 buildings claim ENERGY STAR certification.

“The fact that the policy requires the use of the Energy Star Portfolio Manager in reporting makes a lot of sense. It’s widely used, it is well recognized, it has a lot of credibility, and the EPA makes a lot of training available for people to get familiar with the program,” said Renee Loveland, sustainability manager at Gerding Edlen, one of the nation’s leading real estate investment and development firms. “We’ve been using it over the past several years. All of the other markets we’re currently doing business in have mandatory reporting in place, and Portfolio Manager has been working well for our properties.”

Why are cities like Portland adopting energy performance reporting for commercial buildings?

  • The energy used to power buildings is the largest source of carbon pollution in Portland.
  • Similar to a MPG rating for a car, the energy performance policy allows potential tenants and owners to have access to important information about building energy performance.
  • Commercial energy reporting policies in 12 other U.S. cities have proven to motivate investment in efficiency improvements that save money and reduce carbon emissions.


“This has been a great collaboration among City bureaus and community members, including dozens of building owners and managers,” said Bureau of Planning and Sustainability Director Susan Anderson. “This isn't new. It's tried and true — and already has been adopted in 12 other U.S. cities."

Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/energyreporting to learn more and track program updates.


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