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Get the dish on news, events and announcements related to sustainable food.

Counting (on) Sheep

Of all Oregon traditions, the mantle of ‘cutest’ undoubtedly falls to Oregon State University’s annual lambing event. This year, the university’s Sheep Center is again opening its barn doors to the public, giving visitors an exciting peek at a lesser-known side of our food system.

So trot yourself down to Corvallis between now and March 14th for this not-to-be-missed experience (more details available at the OSU website). There’s no charge, but donations of canned items are happily accepted on behalf of the Linn Benton food bank. So be a lamb, won’t you?

Zoning Code Marches On!

KATU's coverage of the Urban Food Zoning Code Update

KATU aired a piece Sunday night about the City's Zoning Code update, which aims to enhance the growing and distribution of food in Portland. It noted the importance of Portland's backyard farms and features Portland Fruit Tree Project Executive Director and Food Policy Council member, Katy Kolker, as well as Matt Gordon of Cully Neighborhood Farm. Muddy carrots never looked so good!

Have an opinion? We want to hear it! Check out the latest discussion draft of the proposed changes, and be sure to tell us what you think.

For more information, visit our Urban Food Zoning Code Update page.

New Urban Growth Bounty Class!

Urban Growth Bounty has added a kombucha brewing class to its 2012 lineup of courses. Taught by local expert Jared Englund, this brand-new offering covers all you need to know to brew, bottle, and appreciate this popular beverage.

(Also, check out Urban Growth Bounty’s mention in yesterday’s Oregonian!)

Make sure to register soon so that you can take advantage of these excellent classes and build your skills for a healthy, abundant, and cost-effective year.

 

The Northwest Vegetarian Cookbook by Debra Daniels-Zeller

(Step Up to the Plate is running a series of posts to introduce readers to seasonal cooking. We aim to get you through the winter with satisfied taste buds and a head full of delicious recipes. Our third cookbook review is Debra Daniels-Zeller’s Northwest Vegetarian Cookbook.)


baked goodsThe title doesn't lie: The Northwest Vegetarian Cookbook is a great authority for seasonal, tasty meals built with local ingredients. The options are wholly regional (Daniels-Zeller references many Oregon and Washington producers by name, and some of the recipes were themselves created by area farmers), and all are based on the products of the season. As with The Meat Lover’s Meatless Cookbook, the author devotes equal time to winter, spring, summer, and fall; as with Winter Harvest Cookbook, the offerings are varied, numerous, and highly accessible.

While the stories, essays, tips, and random bits of information (ever wonder how beets are harvested?) would, by themselves, be worth the cover price, the recipes are no less engaging. From breakfast to dessert, Daniels-Zeller has you covered.

Time to Plan Your Garden

Beat the chill with Urban Growth Bounty

pear treeIt’s that time again — time to start imagining all the delicious fruits and vegetables just waiting to be planted. Jump-start your own backyard garden with Urban Growth Bounty, and prepare for spring with two of our most popular courses:

  • Learn all about growing fruit in the city from Master Gardener Glen Andresen. The class covers everything you need to get started, from how (and what) to plant to techniques for easy harvesting.

Register now and get a jump on the season! Email food@portlandoregon.gov or call 503-823-6947 with questions.

Heartbleed Security Notice

A serious security vulnerability known as "Heartbleed" was recently discovered in OpenSSL, a popular software library commonly used by many websites on the internet to encrypt communication between a user's computer and a web server.

PortlandOregon.gov is NOT affected by this vulnerability as it does not use the OpenSSL software library. Please rest assured we are dedicated to protecting your security on this website.