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Learn about the Comprehensive Plan Update. Find out more through news items, meeting announcements and summaries.

Preliminary Zoning Concepts for Mixed Use Zones Released

Draft concepts shared at two community workshops; document available online for review

The Mixed Use Zones Project team has released a draft Preliminary Zoning Concept, which it shared and discussed with the public at two recent workshops. The draft concepts include four new zones for discussion, with information about potential development standards. A new Centers Overlay Zone is also being considered.

With more public feedback, the zoning concepts will be refined and eventually incorporated into the Zoning Code to implement the new Comprehensive Plan.
Mixed Use Zones Project: Preliminary Zoning Concept

Read the Mixed Use Zones Project: Preliminary Zoning Concept - DRAFT

At the workshops on November 5 (downtown) and November 6 (at Jefferson High School), community members participated in small group discussions and shared their thoughts on height, transitions and massing of new development; street-level design issues; and incentives and bonuses for community benefits. 

The Mixed Use Zones Project team is incorporating this and other feedback, which will be reflected in more detailed zoning parameters at a second concept workshop planned for early 2015. After that, proposed zoning codes will be fully developed; a proposed draft is planned for public review in spring 2015. The proposed zoning code will be considered by the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission at a public hearing in mid-2015, followed by a recommendation to City Council.

The Mixed Use Zones Project is an early implementation project for the Comprehensive Plan Update. For more information, go to www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/mixeduse.

Final Public Hearing for 2014 on Draft 2035 Comprehensive Plan Draws Large Crowd

More than 75 Portlanders give testimony on draft policies, processes and more; work sessions to begin

2035 Comprehensive Plan Update Proposed DraftOn Tuesday, November 4, the Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) welcomed a full house of community members for a presentation on the Transportation System Plan and testimony on the Comprehensive Plan Proposed Draft.

For almost four hours, close to 80 Portlanders provided comments on a variety of subjects, from demolition to institutional zoning, transportation policies and the public engagement process. This was the last public hearing for 2014; additional hearings on the Comprehensive Plan Update will be held in early 2015. To view the video of the hearing, read the minutes and peruse the written testimony, please visit PSC News.

Testimony accepted until March 13, 2015

Written testimony is still being accepted until March 13, 2015, but community members are encouraged to submit their testimony as early as possible because the commission will be considering testimony and formulating recommendations during upcoming work sessions, which start November 18, 2014.

This first work session will be devoted to developing agendas for upcoming work sessions in 2015. Subsequent work sessions will begin on January 27 and conclude on March 24 (based on the current schedule). Each agenda will be dedicated to one or more themes or topics.

On or before November 18, staff will release an outline of tentative agendas for the upcoming work sessions. This will help community members know how to best time the submittal of their written input to be considered during the relevant work session. For example, if issues related to public involvement policies are scheduled for a February 10 work session, submitting testimony related to that topic by the end of January will allow staff time to review the testimony and acknowledge it in a staff report. This will help ensure it is considered in the PSC’s deliberations.

For updated information about the work sessions and other PSC meetings, please see the PSC tentative agenda. Better yet, see a previous article about the entire Comprehensive Plan Update process moving forward.

Watch This Video: Creating Great Places

See why the Centers and Corridors growth management strategy creates healthy, connected neighborhoods

Centers and corridors are the anchors of healthy connected neighborhoods — concentrating convenient and essential amenities within a compact, walkable area. Did you know that neighborhood hubs like Multnomah Village, Kenton and Montavilla are centers, along with the more obvious town centers like Hollywood and St Johns and the regional center at Gateway?

And corridors? You guessed it: Sandy, Powell and Barbur Boulevards, MLK/Grand and SE Division are just some examples of bustling main streets and thoroughfares, with lots of businesses, mixed use development and access to good transit.  

Preserving Single-Family Neighborhoods

mapCenters and corridors used to be called “nodes and noodles.” You can see why when you look at a map; lots of lines and circles surrounded by residential areas. Concentrating population and business growth in these higher intensity places preserves single-family neighborhoods while providing access to goods and services to more people who live in or near more compact development.

It’s a growth management strategy that has helped make Portland the livable, walkable city it has become. It’s how Portland has become such a great place to live, work and play.

Portlanders Tell All

Now you can learn more about what makes cities like Portland such great places. In this third episode of the Centers and Corridors video series, you’ll watch Portlanders from all over the city share what they love about their center or corridor — and what they’d like to see improved. Hear from Mayor Charlie Hales, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability Director Susan Anderson, local business owners, community leaders and residents as they talk about how the Comprehensive Plan and Centers and Corridors strategy can help fill in the gaps in our neighborhoods and bring the “ingredients” of vibrant places to all Portlanders.

Calling All Map Nerds

Live from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, it’s the Map App Explorer!

Not the type to geek out over maps? Just try the new Map App Explorer! It combines the land use, transportation and infrastructure designs as featured in the Comprehensive Plan Update with updated data layers from the Proposed Draft Map App.

Users can create myriad combinations of layers to look at data:

    • Centers and corridors with demographic information, to see who is served by the concentration of services in Portland’s densest areas.
    • Proposed stormwater projects with natural hazards, such as flood and earthquake risk, to look at the strategic location of infrastructure.
    • Transportation projects with median age, to see the diversity of ages served by candidate projects.
    • And more!

Map App ExplorerMap App Explorer is designed to help users better understand the context for and relationship between the proposals in the Comprehensive Plan Update. Explorer allows you to make comparisons between different land use, transportation and infrastructure proposals with additional background data layers. For example, how does Portland’s plan for developing along centers and corridors (the red lines and circles on the map at right) relate to people’s ability to easily access transit (the blue areas)? 

Desktop, phone or tablet?

Both Map App Explorer and the Proposed Draft Map App can be operated on all devices, from desktop to mobile. Though it’s a cool tool for analyzing the context and relationships between planning proposals, Explorer is not as detailed as the Proposed Draft Map App, and it does not accept user comments.

Please continue to submit comments for consideration by the Planning and Sustainability Commission through the Proposed Draft Map App. You can navigate between the two versions of the Map App by clicking on the dots at the top left of your screen. (To comment on the Proposed Draft Map App, click on the INFO icon at the bottom left of your screen.)

What’s the difference, again?

  • Proposed Draft Map App = Actual land use proposal + infrastructure projects (comments welcome)
  • Map App Explorer = Proposed Draft Map App + supporting data layers

So geek out with the new Map App Explorer, and then let us know what you think about the Comprehensive Plan Update through the Proposed Draft Map App! Comments are welcome until March 13, 2015.