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Phone: 503-823-7700

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1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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Comprehensive Plan Update Early Implementation discussion drafts coming this summer and fall

Projects address employment land, institutional campuses and mixed use zones; includes consolidated zoning map

Portland’s new Comprehensive Plan will manage growth and development in the city for the next 20 years. That’s a pretty abstract concept. But down to earth, the plan includes some “early implementation” projects that will update the zoning code — or the rules — that regulate the size, allowable uses, location and scale of new buildings and development.

The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) is focusing particularly on future development in mixed use zones, in and around campus institutions (e.g., hospitals and college campuses) and of employment land, including industrial areas. Project staff will be releasing discussion drafts for each project starting in July and running through September.

Discussion drafts allow planners to share their initial thinking with the community and consider the feedback as they develop their proposed drafts, which are presented to the Planning and Sustainability Commission for formal review and public hearings.

Early implementation projects will address the zoning code and map in different ways:

The Employment Zoning Project is implementing new directions for industrial and employment land uses. Project outcomes will include code changes to industrial and general employment zones and zoning map changes for new mixed employment areas. These land use changes address prosperity and equity objectives and 20-year land needs for job growth, while protecting neighborhood livability and watershed health.   

The Campus Institution Zoning Update Project increases the amount of development capacity for Portland’s dispersed college and hospital campuses. This will help these institutions accommodate projected demand for space and facilities over the next 20 years. The project also addresses surrounding neighborhoods and seeks to protect them from potential negative impacts of such development.

The Mixed Use Zones Project is proposing new zones for mixed use areas to address issues of scale, size, mass and location of new development in mixed use areas as well as create incentives for developers to build more affordable housing. In addition to reducing the number of zones for commercial development in these areas, the project will address community concerns about appropriate transitions between commercial main streets and hubs to surrounding single-dwelling neighborhoods.

Early Implementation Project Timeline

Bureau of Planning and Sustainability releases discussion drafts (comments to BPS staff):

  • Employment Land (Zoning Code and Map) – July 2015
  • Campus Institutions (Zoning Code) – July 2015
  • Mixed Use Zones (Zoning Code and Map) – August 2015
  • Residential and Open Space (Zoning Map) – September 2015

PSC holds public hearings and accepts written testimony on proposed drafts and recommendations: September 2015 – March 2016
City Council holds public hearings: May – June 2016
City Council adopts new Comprehensive Plan: Summer 2016
Oregon Department of Land Conservation & Development reviews adopted plan: 2016
Effective date: 2017

Early Implementation (Task 5)

Time

Event/Milestone

Opportunities for providing feedback

If yes, to whom?

Summer 2015

Release of Discussion Drafts for Employment Land, Campus Institutions and Mixed Use Zones

Yes – The public may give feedback to staff, who will consider it when developing the Proposed Draft

Project staff

Summer 2015

Release of Discussion Draft of Residential and Open Space Zoning Map

Yes – The public may give feedback to staff, who will consider it when developing the Proposed Draft

Project staff

Fall 2015

PSC Public Hearings and Recommendations on Institutional Campus

Yes – Testimony may be submitted in writing and given orally at public hearings

Planning and Sustainability Commission

Fall 2015

PSC Public Hearings and Recommendations on Employment Land

Yes – Testimony may be submitted in writing and given orally at public hearings

Planning and Sustainability Commission

Fall 2015

PSC Public Hearings and Recommendations on Mixed Use Zones

Yes – Testimony may be submitted in writing and given orally at public hearings

Planning and Sustainability Commission

Winter 2016

PSC Public Hearings on the Proposed Zoning Maps

Yes – Testimony may be submitted in writing and given orally at public hearings

Planning and Sustainability Commission

All hearings are open to the public. Please check the Planning and Sustainability Commission calendar for schedule updates at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/35452.

City Council to hold public hearing on SE Quadrant Plan on July 8 at 3 p.m.

Portlanders invited to testify on new plan to help the Central Eastside thrive as a 21st-century employment district and transit hub, with cultural attractions and access to the Willamette River

MEDIA ADVISORY

Wednesday, July 01, 2015

CONTACTS
Troy Doss
503-823-5857
troy.doss@portlandoregon.gov

Portland, ORE. — On July 8, 2015, City Council will hold a public hearing on a nonbinding resolution to adopt the Southeast Quadrant Plan. Portlanders are invited to testify on the SE Quadrant Recommended Draft at the hearing.

Public Hearing, Southeast Quadrant Plan – Testimony Welcome
July 8, 2015, 3 p.m.
Portland City Council
Council Chambers (City Hall, 2nd Floor)
1221 SW 4th Avenue

How to give testimony
You can share your feedback on the plan with City Council in several ways:

1. Testify in person at the hearing (see details below)

2. Submit written testimony:

Attn: Council Clerk
1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Room 140
Portland, OR 97204

3. FAX or email comments to 503-823-4571 or cctestimony@portlandoregon.gov. Written testimony must be received by the time of the hearing and must include your name and address.

Guidance for testifying in person

  • Arrive early to sign up and get instructions on how testimony will be heard.
  • The normal allotted time to testify is 3 minutes; however, it may be necessary to limit the time to 2 minutes or less if there are many people testifying.
  • Testifiers can provide the commissioners with printed materials. Please provide eight copies to the Council Clerk.
  • Testifiers are allowed to show Power Point presentations or other slides, but they must use the laptop provided at the testimony table and advance their own slides within the allotted 2-3 minutes. It’s helpful to submit files before the hearing as there is usually not enough time to load them and get copies for the record once public testimony begins.

Download council documents
Southeast Quadrant Plan – Recommended Draft

The plan is provided as a large ~28MB file; it is also divided into chapters. The same material can be found in both. If you are having trouble downloading the larger file, please try downloading the individual sections.

Next Steps
Once the plan is adopted by resolution, it will be integrated with the N/NE and West Quadrant plans and other input into a Central City 2035 Plan, which will then be the subject of public hearings before both the Planning and Sustainability Commission and City Council in 2016.

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PSC News: July 14, 2015 Meeting Information

Comprehensive Plan — work session / recommendation

Agenda

  • Comprehensive Plan — work session / recommendation

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer.dll/webdrawer/search/rec?sm_class=uri_7223&count&rows=50.

Portland City Council Adopts New Climate Action Plan

New plan emphasizes equity and includes a new methodology for measuring carbon emissions from consumer choices.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

June 24, 2015

CONTACT 
Eden Dabbs
503-823-7007
eden.dabbs@portlandoregon.gov

Portland City Council Adopts New Climate Action Plan

New plan emphasizes equity and includes a new methodology for measuring carbon emissions from consumer choices.

Portland, Ore. —  Today, Portland City Council adopted the joint City of Portland and Multnomah County 2015 Climate Action Plan, strengthening local efforts to achieve an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050. The 2015 Climate Action Plan builds on Portland’s 20+ year legacy of climate action with ambitious new policies and fresh research on consumer choices. Community leaders serving low-income households and communities of color were engaged to help ensure that all Portlanders benefit from the City and County’s climate action efforts.

Portland was the first city in the United States to adopt a local plan to cut carbon, and sustained efforts by businesses, public agencies and individuals are producing results. While total carbon emissions in the US are up 7 percent since 1990, Portland has cut total local emissions by 14 percent, despite adding 170,000 more people and 75,000 more jobs over the same time period. 

"Cities are a key part of the solution to climate change,” Portland Mayor Charlie Hales said. “Equity is a key factor. As we reduce carbon, it is imperative that we ensure that the benefits and opportunities that come along are shared with every part of Portland. Especially with people who haven’t benefited in the past. This plan makes important commitments to advancing equity while we address climate change.”

“We all bear the costs of climate change, but seniors, children, the homeless and communities of color are impacted the most.” said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. “Worsening air quality, flooding and heat waves affect our health and well-being, and making our community climate resilient is a vital part of doing our job.”

“Thanks to the efforts of Portland residents, businesses and organizations who have worked to reduce their carbon footprint, local carbon emissions are down 35 percent per person,” said City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability Director Susan Anderson. “This is promising progress, and we need to keep up the momentum to reach Portland’s climate goals.”

As global leaders grapple with the concerns and opportunities the changing climate presents, Portland has become an international destination for planners and decision-makers seeking proven strategies for climate action. Since 2010, more than 160 delegations from around the world have come to Portland to speak with business and government leaders to understand how Portland has lowered emissions while creating jobs, welcoming new residents and creating a more livable community. Portland and Multnomah County now have 12,000 clean tech jobs, an increase of 25 percent in the last 15 years.

Accomplishments and New Action

  • This summer TriMet will open Tilikum Crossing: Bridge of the People, the largest bridge in the United States to carry people on transit, bikes and on foot, but no cars. To accommodate the potential for higher river levels from climate change, the height of the bridge above the water was increased. The new plan calls for continued investments that expand active transportation options throughout Portland and ensure those infrastructure investments are resilient to the impacts of climate change. 
  • Over the last five years, Portland residents have installed more than 2,000 solar systems and more than 2,000 homeowners have insulated their houses. The new plan calls for doubling solar installations through efforts like community solar and continuing to weatherize homes at a faster rate than ever.
  • Recently the Portland City Council adopted an energy tracking and reporting policy for large commercial buildings. The City is working with building owners and managers to access resources and technologies to improve the energy performance of Portland’s largest 1,000 commercial buildings.
  • Recent changes to garbage and composting service have led to a 36 percent reduction in garbage headed to the landfill. Residential bills are flat or down three years in a row, while Portland’s recycling rate has reached 70 percent, one of the highest in the nation. The proposed draft focuses on boosting food scrap recover and multifamily recycling to raise those numbers even higher.

Engaging communities to advance equity

Portland is changing. More than half of the students in Portland Public Schools, for example, are people of color. Low-income communities and people of color in Multnomah County are likely to experience the impacts of climate change more acutely, including poor air quality and heat waves.

At the same time, these communities historically have not had the same access to the kinds of services and infrastructure that make low-carbon choices easier and affordable, such as frequent transit service and adequate sidewalks in East Portland or energy efficiency programs that benefit renters. From transportation investments and economic opportunities to tree plantings and policy engagement, the 2015 plan makes those actions that reduce disparities and ensure that under-served and under-represented communities share in the benefits of climate action work a priority.

Exploring what we consume

For the first time, the Climate Action Plan includes a consumption-based inventory, tallying carbon emissions associated with all of the goods and services that are produced elsewhere and consumed in Multnomah County. This inventory considers carbon emissions from the full lifecycle of goods and services, including production, transportation, wholesale and retail, use and disposal. Global carbon emissions as a result of local consumer demand are larger than the volume of emissions produced locally.

The addition of the consumption-based inventory offers insight into a wider range of opportunities to reduce carbon. Residents, for example, can shift purchases toward goods that are durable and repairable. Businesses have opportunities throughout their supply chains to choose lower-carbon options, and new business models like car-sharing are emerging to make it easier to borrow, repair and reuse everyday goods.

Next Steps

Tomorrow, June 25, the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners will vote on adopting the plan. Find a copy of the plan and follow the progress at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/climate.

Learn more about how to take action at www.portlandcan.org.

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Media Advisory: Portland City Council to consider 2015 Climate Action Plan on June 24

Proposed plan contains revisions from public comment period, outlines next steps for achieving Portland and Multnomah County's carbon reduction goals.

MEDIA ADVISORY

CONTACT

Christine Llobregat
503-823-7007
christine.llobregat@portlandoregon.gov

WHO: Portland City Council, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

WHAT: On behalf of all City of Portland bureaus, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will present the proposed draft of the 2015 Climate Action Plan for adoption by Portland City Council on Wednesday, June 24. The plan updates Portland’s roadmap for the community to achieve an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with an interim goal of a 40 percent reduction by 2030.

WHEN: Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at 2 p.m.

WHERE: City Council Chambers, Portland City Hall, 1221 SW 4th Avenue, Portland

WHY: In 1993, Portland was the first city in the United States to create a local action plan for cutting carbon. Since then, the City of Portland and Multnomah County have collaborated to produce updated climate plans that help guide the design and implementation of City and County efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Since 1990, total local carbon emissions have declined by 14 percent while 75,000 more jobs were added to the economy and the population grew by 31 percent. The plan being considered for adoption by City Council includes revisions based on comments and feedback from the public and outlines the actions the City and County will take in the next five years to keep Portland on the path of reducing local carbon emissions.

New focus areas include advancing equity and exploring consumption

Advancing equity: From transportation investments and economic opportunities to tree plantings and policy engagement, the proposed plan prioritizes actions that reduce disparities and ensure that under-served and under-represented communities share in the benefits of climate action work.

Exploring consumption: For the first time, the proposed plan includes a consumption-based inventory that counts carbon emissions associated with the goods and services that are produced elsewhere and consumed in Multnomah County. This inventory considers carbon emissions from the full lifecycle of goods and services, including production, transportation, wholesale and retail, use and disposal. Global carbon emissions as a result of local consumer demand are larger than the volume of emissions produced locally. The addition of the consumption-based inventory offers insight into a wider range of opportunities to reduce carbon.

Highlights of the proposed 2015 Climate Action Plan

  • The proposed plan calls for expanding active transportation options throughout Portland and ensure those infrastructure investments are resilient to the impacts of climate change. 
  • Given the strong momentum in Portland around home energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, the proposed plan calls for doubling solar installations and continuing home weatherization efforts.
  • With a newly adopted energy tracking and reporting policy, the City will work with building owners and managers to improve the energy performance of Portland’s largest 1,000 commercial buildings.
  • Recent changes to garbage and composting service have led to a 36 percent reduction in garbage headed to the landfill. Residential bills are flat or down three years in a row, while Portland’s recycling rate has reached 70 percent, one of the highest in the nation. The proposed plan focuses on boosting food scrap recovery and multifamily recycling to raise those numbers even higher.