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Mayor Charlie Hales

City of Portland Mayor Charlie Hales

Phone: 503-823-4120

1221 SW 4th Avenue, Room 340, Portland, OR 97204

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Outreach Workers, Police Praise Relationship-Building Approach to Policing

Outreach Workers, Police Praise Relationship-Building Approach to Policing

THURSDAY, DEC. 4, 2014 — Mayor Charlie Hales recently convened a work session on managing the homeless population on sidewalks and in parks to brief City Council on the Portland Police Bureau’s work toward relationship-building as policing.

Mayor Hales, police, street performerHales, commissioner in charge of the police bureau, in the summer joined a police walking beat on Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard, and was impressed with the evident relationships those police officers had built with the homeless population and business owners. Hales plans on growing the police-community connection, with a vision of a walking patrol in every neighborhood.

“As Sir Robert Peel said, ‘The police are the public and the public are the police,’” Hales said. “That’s our guiding principle.”

At the meeting, Hales asked police, outreach organizations, and others to share with the rest of Council their experiences with the pilot programs.

WATCH THE FULL VIDEO (2 HOURS)

Israel Beyer, executive director of Street Roots:

Street Roots wants to say the walking beat has been great success. It can be national model for police bureaus across the country, which are looking for formulas that may work to solve these problems. In 15 years been doing this work, this is the best program I’ve seen.”

Dennis Lundberg, associate director of Janus Youth Programs:

“I deeply applaud Central Precinct’s work. This is something that, at Janus, we’ve been striving for for at least a decade—this level of partnership. It’s not a matter of shifting back to community policing, it’s a matter of putting the right officers with right training out of the street. I deeply respect all the men on the police foot patrol.

“For me, and I’ve doing street outreach for over 13 years, it’s like having a whole ’nother team of street outreach workers out there. Their level of empathy, compassion, the way they’re engaging young people experiencing homelessness should be applauded. And I agree with Israel: This should be a national model.

Mark Jolin, executive director of JOIN:

“All of us who do this work, we know it’s a process of coming back over and over again, and building trust to the point people actually believe that your offer of services is an offer of ongoing support and relationships that go beyond recommendation to a service that’s already very full.

“We at JOIN have had a relationship with police for close to 20 years. This approach to the work has been present, but now it’s organized and it’s getting support at the highest levels of the Police Bureau.And it’s going to make a world of difference—it did this summer in the pilot area, not just in addressing these problems, but also in bringing to community attention to them.

“It didn’t solve the problem of camping, and of people generating complaints; we still have thousands of people living personal private lives out on the street.

“What changed was the way the officers tasked with responding to that were engaging people. It wasn’t just, ‘this is the impact you’re having on the neighborhood.’ It was recognizing, ‘asking you to move has an adverse impact on you,’ and addressing that.”

Sgt. Ric DeLand, Portland Police Bureau:

For the walking beat pilot program, Sgt. Deland wanted a team of officers who volunteered for the duty; 12 did. Since the success of the program, more officers have e-mailed him, interested in joining, he said.

“We welcomed an entire community of people back to Portland after they’ve been told, ‘we don’t want you here.’ We invited them back in and said, ‘We want good people here. We want good people invested in community.’ We talked to them about how they present themselves, and they responded in droves.”

DeLand said the officers this summer led by example. For instance, he said, “Uniformed officers picked up garbage this year.”

One day on Hawthorne, he saw that someone had knocked over the newspaper boxes in front of Bagdad Theater, leaving a mess of newspapers strewn across the sidewalk and in the street. He walked over and started picking them up. A person sitting at a table put down his beer to help. The traveler asking for change in front of the building got up to help. The three found a business with a recycling bin to toss the papers. When DeLand walked back along the stretch, people at the tables outside the Bagdad raised their beers.

“We brought a scalpel to this broad brush problem—that’s the change we made this year. We dealt with people on an individual basis, with the families they create for themselves, with tribes, as they call themselves.”

DeLand pointed to an example another speaker had, of a sign on the porch saying, “If you’re going to sleep here, please leave by dawn and clean up after yourself”; people have done just that. “That’s the experience we’ve had with people,” he said.

“That’s the vast majority of people. If you present the issues and how they can help, they’ll be responsive to that. Only a handful of people haven’t been,” he said.

He pointed to the Waterfront Park cleanup, when 100 travelers worked shoulder-to-shoulder to clean up garbage in the park.

“Invite them to be part of the solution rather than being part of the problem, and they’ll jump at the opportunity.”

Mayor Hales, Commissioner Novick Mark Fulfilled 'Back-to-Basics' Promise

Mayor Hales, Commissioner Novick Mark Fulfilled 'Back-to-Basics' Promise

MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 — Mayor Charlie Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick on Monday announced they had bested their “back-to-basics” promise, with more than 100 miles of streets paved in one year.

Mayor Hales paving the 100th mile“We paved a lot of streets with a limited amount of money,” said Hales, standing in front of the paver that will complete the city’s 104th paved mile of 2013-14 alongside the Lloyd Center MAX tracks. “The bad news is, to keep this up we need new revenue for our transportation system. Our mindset needs to be taking care of what we have by investing in what we need in order to build world-class neighborhoods.”

Portland Bureau of Transportation spent $11 million paving 100 miles; 53 miles were treated with fog seal and 47 miles with grind-and-pave. Low-traffic streets, such as residential streets around schools, were treated with the less pricey fog seal, and high-traffic streets were ground down and repaved.

Before the mayor took office, only around 30 miles of streets were repaved annually. Hales and Novick, Transportation commissioner, last year vowed to get “back-to-basics,” with city government taking care of its assets.

Streets are like teeth, Novick said Monday: Just as brushing is a lot cheaper than a root canal, maintaining streets as they’re beginning to show signs of wear is a lot cheaper than rebuilding them. 

Transportation Funding: Working to Care for City's Largest Asset

Mayor, Nationwide Coalition of Mayors Call on Congress for Transportation Funding

Tillikum Crossing under constructionWEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2015 — Mayor Charlie Hales today joined a bipartisan coalition of mayors nationwide to call on U.S. Congress to act on transportation funding before the federal transportation authorization bill expires at the end of the month.

Join the action: E-mail your congressmen and raise awareness use the hashtag #RebuildRenew on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to join the conversation about securing increased federal funding for transportation and municipal infrastructure. 

"Today, I stand with mayors nationwide to call on Congress to provide adequate funding for our nation's infrastructure," Mayor Hales said. "Congressman Earl Blumenauer has been a steady partner in calling for proper federal transportation funding, earlier this year advocating for an increase in the federal gas tax. My colleagues across the country are asking their delegations to step up and renew federal funding for transportation."

The nation faces a $160 billion backlog just to bring public transit and road systems into a state of good repair. The lack of a long-term federal funding bill creates local funding uncertainty, which jeopardizes infrastructure project planning and discourages private sector investment. The lack of a commitment on the federal level stifles local business investment and job creation in our city and nationwide.

Federal investment has not kept pace with demand, resulting in an outdated, overburdened surface transportation system that is ill-equipped to handle current, let alone future, needs. Across the United States, our public transit maintenance needs exceed $77 billion, and the nation’s bridge backlog alone is an estimated $121 billion. The Highway Trust Fund, which funds most highway and transit spending, is almost depleted and the federal government is struggling to maintain the status quo, much less make new investments.

In Portland, an auditor report found that it would cost $75 million extra revenue per year for 10 years to bring Portland streets into good repair — and that was two years ago. Now the estimate is closer to $90 million in new revenue per year. Nearly half of our busiest streets are rated in "poor" or "very poor" condition. Last year Mayor Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick increased the city's street paving from about 30 miles per year to more than 100 miles in one year.

"But to tackle the entire city's infrastructure needs, we need the state and federal governments to act," Mayor Hales said.

On Monday, a coalition of 44 Oregon mayors, led by Mayor Hales, stood together to call on the Oregon Legislature to pass a comprehensive transportation funding package this session.

"We need Congress to do its job and pass a long-term transportation bill that increases investments in our transportation infrastructure," Mayor Hales says. 


Charlie Hales Rallies Mayors Statewide to Support Legislature on Transportation Funding

MONDAY, MAY 11, 2015 — When Portland Mayor Charlie Hales met with Gov. Kate Brown shortly after she took office this winter, she asked for his help to support new funding for transportation statewide.

Today, Hales’ office presented legislative leaders with a letter signed by 44 mayors from throughout Oregon supporting additional funding for transportation.

“The state of our roads is increasingly poor,” the letter reads. “From Hillsboro to Hood River, Ashland to Albany, Portland to Port Orford to Pendleton, cities are facing an annual shortfall of over $300 million in their street maintenance budgets.”

The letter urges state lawmakers to pass a comprehensive transportation package during the 2015 legislative session.

The mayor also spent more than a year working to establish a street fund to address the estimated $90 million per year backlog of maintenance and safety issues on Portland’s streets. This winter, he put the city’s street fund proposal on hold to give Speaker of the House Tina Kotek time to craft the statewide transportation package.

Last week, the mayor unveiled his proposed city budget for 2015-16. With an additional $49 million in discretionary funding available, the major has called for more almost $20 million dedicated to streets, including $6.89 million for street safety and $8.89 million for paving.

This weekend, a bicyclist was hit by a pickup truck and critically injured at Southeast 26th Avenue and Powell Boulevard. Powell is a state-owned highway. A rally to encourage ODOT to improve safety conditions is set for 4 to 6 p.m. today, at the intersection.

“This is not just a Portland issue,” Hales said. “This is a priority for small towns, middle-sized communities and cities; for rural, suburban and urban residents; for conservative, moderate and liberal office holders. We are all in this together.”

This is the second time that Hales has gathered a coalition of Oregon mayors for a statewide cause at the Legislature. In 2013, he led more than 50 mayors in a successful effort to increase funding for public K-12 schools.


Idaho Legislature passes gas tax increase; Portland should too

THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 2015 — The Idaho Legislature has passed a gas tax increase, with a bipartisan coalition recognizing the tremendous need for funding to maintain roads and bridges. "If Idaho can do it, Oregon certainly should be able to," Mayor Hales said.

Like leaders across the country, Mayor Hales has been grappling with a lack of state and federal funding to maintain the city's largest asset -- its streets. He has asked the Oregon Legislature to index the state gas tax so that it keeps pace with maintenance needs (https://www.portlandoregon.gov/ogr/article/510982). Last week the mayor joined leaders across the country in a ‪#‎StandUp4Transportation‬ campaign, calling on Congress to adequately fund transportation.

But Mayor Hales predicts funding street safety and maintenance will fall to the local level: "I wish Congress would do its job. I wish they would pass a transportation reauthorization bill. I wish they would move the gas tax from where it’s been stuck for 21 years at 18 cents. That’s crazy. What did $0.18 buy 21 years ago versus now? Well, not as much asphalt. I can tell you that. So Congress is inert and running for cover, and those of us at the local level are going have to step up on this stuff."


Mayor, leaders across the country call on Congress to fund transportation

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015 — Last fall Mayor Hales talked with The Urbanophile about Portland, touching on the need for transportation funding. Mayor Hales has been grappling with a lack of state and federal funding to maintain the city's largest asset -- its streets. Now he is standing with leaders across the country to call for Congress to adequately fund transportation. ‪#‎StandUp4Transportation

An excerpt from the interview: "I wish Congress would do their job. I wish they would pass a transportation reauthorization bill. I wish they would move the gas tax from where it’s been stuck for 21 years at 18 cents. That’s crazy. What did $0.18 buy 21 years ago versus now? Well, not as much asphalt. I can tell you that. So Congress is inert and running for cover, and those of us at the local level are going have to step up on this stuff." ‪#‎MayorsDo


Mayors call for funding in #StandUp4Transportation campaign

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015 — Today more than 60 mayors across the country are joining New York Mayor Bill de Blasio to call on Congress to invest in our infrastructure. Mayor Hales has called on the Oregon Legislature and Congress to do their part to provide adequate funding for street maintenance and safety (https://www.portlandoregon.gov/mayor/index.cfm?&a=509079). The current state of the streets is unsafe, and the lack of funding is unacceptable. Today, mayors ‪#‎StandUp4Transportation.


Blumenauer Reintroduces Bill for Federal Gas Tax Increase

Rep. Blumenauer at press conferenceWASHINGTON, D.C., FEB. 4, 2015 — Congressman Earl Blumenauer today introduced the Update, Promote, and Develop America’s Transportation Essentials (UPDATE) Act, which would generate a much-needed $210 billion over the next 10 years for the nearly insolvent Highway Trust Fund.

“Rep. Blumenauer is once again pushing Congress to be the partner it’s supposed to be in transportation funding. Thank you, Earl, for your leadership,” Mayor Charlie Hales said. “Portland has a $1.5 billion unfunded street liability. We need Congress and the Oregon Legislature to act — and to act at the city level — to take care of our largest asset.”

The UPDATE Act is accompanied by Congressman Blumenauer’s Road Usage Charge Pilot Program Act, which would create a competitive grant program to fund pilot projects such as those undertaken by Oregon Department of Transportation.

Congressman Blumenauer’s UPDATE Act would raise gas and diesel taxes by 15 cents over three years, indexing them to inflation. The $210 billion it would generate over a decade would be enough to make up the Highway Trust Fund shortfall and increase infrastructure investment by at least $4 billion per year.

States and cities need the certainty of a long-term reauthorization and a sustainable funding mechanism to create jobs, reduce congestion and repair roads and bridges, Mayor Hales says. Since the last full six-year surface transportation bill expired in 2003, Congress has passed 23 short-term extensions. The latest extension is set to run out at the end of May — on the eve of the summer construction season.

Congressman Blumenauer’s action comes follows President Obama’s 2016 budget, providing nearly $95 billion for U.S. Department of Transportation infrastructure projects.

The president called for a 14 percent one-time tax on previously untaxed foreign income. That would generate an estimated $268 billion in revenue. The budget helps fund a six-year, $478 billion program for highway, bridge and transit projects; that’s a 33 percent increase in large-project funding and a 75 percent increase on transit.

In Salem, Gov. John Kitzhaber and Speaker Tina Kotek have prioritized transportation funding for the session, which started this week.

After putting street fund efforts on hold while transportation funding is considered in the Oregon Legislature, city leaders have asked the body to lift state pre-emptions that prohibit the city from raising revenue on vehicle registration and studded tires. They’ve asked for a regional gas tax; for the state to fix up orphan highways and deed them over; and for an increase in statewide gas tax. A gas tax increase will require 18 votes in Senate and 36 in House.

“Last year we dug down deep with the dollars we already had and paved more streets. We went from paving 30 miles per year to paving 100 miles per year with the money we already had,” Mayor Hales said. “Now we’re calling on Congress and the State Legislature to support our colleagues in funding transportation.”


Portland Transportation Leaders Pause Street Fund Vote as Legislature Crafts Transportation Bill

Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015  – Portland Mayor Charlie Hales and Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick today temporarily halted the paperwork necessary to take an advisory vote to the May ballot, regarding options to pay for city street maintenance and safety.

"Today, I am announcing a pause in our local efforts to fund our streets and safety projects within the City of Portland," Mayor Hales said. "Over the past week, I have had conversations with Speaker of the House Tina Kotek and with Gov. John Kitzhaber. They have each assured me that a statewide transportation package is a top priority for them this legislative session."

The Legislature is set to convene in February. The deadline for Portland to submit paperwork for the May election was 5 p.m. today.

"Because they recognize the importance of efforts to fund transportation infrastructure, they will hear the needs of local governments and ensure they are part of state transportation conversations as they work to give communities the tools to build and maintain critical infrastructure," Hales said.

"We are pleased to know that the Legislature is very interested in a transportation funding discussion this year," Commissioner Novick said. "We have said all along that the street fund we have proposed will not address all our needs, and that we are counting on the state and federal governments to step up."

The city has conducted more than 14 months of hearings to craft a proposal to pay for street maintenance and safety.

"During the passionate conversations we have had in Portland regarding transportation funding, many options were discussed, none of which prove to be popular," Hales said.

"Some options were put forward by Portlanders that we do not have the authority to enact. As your mayor, I will go to Salem to seek that authority."

Hales said he also will enlist the aid of mayors throughout Oregon to push for more authority for cities. "Together, we can represent the needs of cities, all of which will benefit from new options to fund infrastructure at a time when the existing options don’t satisfy our communities," he said.

"The completion of this work comes when all three levels of government have acted; when Congress, the Legislature and the Portland City Council have all authorized new revenues to pay for streets and roads," Hales said. "This cooperation between the State of Oregon and local governments gives us, as Oregonians, the best way forward toward that objective."


Commissioner Novick announces two-part strategy to fund safety and maintenance

MONDAY, DEC. 29, 2014 -- As a year of debate over city transportation funding draws to a close, City Commissioner Steve Novick today announced a two-part strategy to ensure funding for transportation maintenance and safety priorities.

“We are proposing a revised residential user fee, with a hearing on January 8 at 6 p.m. and a vote scheduled for January 14. If that fails, either in Council or through a subsequent referral to the ballot, we will prepare to campaign for a progressive income tax in 2016,” Novick said. The proposed non-residential fee is unchanged.

The proposed user fee will vary by income, based on national statistics showing the extent to which gasoline consumption varies by income quintile. “Gasoline use is one proxy for ‘road use,’ and gasoline use varies somewhat by income level,” Novick said.

Under the proposed fee, tax filers in the lowest fifth of the income distribution would pay $3 a month; filers in the second fifth would pay $5 a month; filers in the middle fifth would pay $7.45 a month; filers in the second-highest fifth would pay $9 a month; and filers in the top fifth would pay $12 a month. The fee is projected to raise $23 million per year.

If the user fee fails, Novick said, he plans to propose a progressive income tax to be sent to the ballot in May or November of 2016. “What I would propose is an income tax that, for married filers, exempts the first $35,000 in income, and then applies graduated rates as follows: one-tenth of one percent of income between $35,000 and $60,000; two-tenths of one percent of income between $60,000 and $100,000; three-tenths of one percent of income between $100,000 and $250,000; and four-tenths of one percent of income above $250,000.” Such a tax is also projected to raise $23 million a year. That proposal includes a $5000 per dependent deduction and is tax deductible on the state and federal returns.

“My personal preference is for a progressive income tax, which is also the most popular option among Portlanders generally. But pursuing that option would involve a campaign that would not end until at least May, and possibly November of 2016 – which means postponing actual work to repair streets and make them safer. As the Mayor and I have repeatedly said, the longer we wait, the worse the problem gets. It seems possible that we could pass a user fee in Council that would not require a campaign, which would mean that we could get to work much sooner,” Novick said.

Table 1 shows the monthly fee that would be charged under the Residential Transportation User Fee. This proposal will be presented to the City Council at a public hearing Jan. 8.

Table 2 shows the monthly charge estimated for a residential income tax that may be introduced to voters if the Residential Transportation User Fee proposal is not approved.

Table 1: Residential Transportation User Fee proposal

Annual Income Range

Average Annual Gas Spending

Monthly Fee

≤$13,000

$1,231

$3.00

>$13,000 - $27,000

$1,850

$5.00

>$27,000 - $46,000

$2,622

$7.45

>$46,000 - $82,000

$3,284

$9.00

>$82,000

$4,071

$12.00

Notes: Income ranges apply to single filers and married or joint filers. Average Annual Gas Spending is based on national averages calculated by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics..


Mayor Talks to 'Think Out Loud' About Proposed Street Fund

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19, 2014 -- Mayor Charlie Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick, in charge of the Portland Bureau of Transportation, this afternoon talked about the street fund on OPB's "Think Out Loud" program.

They were joined by two vocal opponents of the proposal, which would use a small fee and modest income tax to generate about $46 million to repair streets and improve safety. One guest on the show, a woman who owns a business, said that although her fee would be $3 per month, she objects to the fund on principle. 

Hales challenged the basis for opposition, saying the city needs to do this -- the street fund -- or do nothing, or do something else. Opponents were unable to offer alternate revenue-generating proposals. 

Listen to the full interview here: https://soundcloud.com/thinkoutloudopb/city-rolls-out-the-latest-1


Mayor Talks to KATU About Proposed Street Fund

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19, 2014 -- Mayor Charlie Hales last week talked to KATU News' ‪"Your Voice Your Vote‬" program about the street fund, which will be heard at City Council tomorrow, Thursday, at 2 p.m.Hales tells the program: "Taxes aren’t popular. I want to remind people that we have a crumbling street system in the city of Portland. It’s been crumbling for decades. And we have three options: Do this. Do nothing. Or do something else."

Hales has heard from residents and businesses that the new street fund is a manageable solution. The fee for businesses and income tax for residents (starting at $5 per month for households with, after deductions, a $40,000 annual income) will cover basic maintenance and paving (56 percent) and basic safety, such as building sidewalks (44 percent). Hales emphasized that the fund is only a start: "We also need state and federal governments to step up and raise revenue."

Why push is the mayor pushing for this revenue? "It ought to be possible for children in Portland neighborhoods to walk to school on a sidewalk. That’s not true today. It ought to be possible to get across streets with heavy traffic, and right now that’s not the case. Last year, we had 35 Portlanders killed in traffic in a city that only had 16 homicides. Each of those people was lost to a Portland families. Safety is a big deal."

WATCH THE FULL INTERVIEW: http://www.katu.com/politics/video/Your-Voice-Your-Vote-Mayor-Hales-on-proposed-street-fund-282981081.html?tab=video&c=y


Council Hears Public Testimony on Revised Street Fund Proposal

MONDAY, NOV. 10, 2014 – After months of public input, Portland Mayor Charlie Hales and City Commissioner Steve Novick proposed a Portland Street Fund that will more than double the City’s pavement maintenance budget.

Mayor Hales on paving machine The Street Fund investments also will make it safer for children to walk to school and for seniors to walk to transit stops, by filling in missing sidewalks and making crossing improvements at dangerous intersections.

The Portland City Council will conduct a first reading and public hearing on the proposal at 2 p.m., Nov. 20 at City Council Chambers. A second reading and vote are expected at 10 a.m., Dec. 3.

The fund will provide about $15 million per year for preventive maintenance for street pavement in the first three years – investments that are estimated to prevent the need for more than $650 million in costly rebuilds, over a 10-year period.

“I had said: When it comes to street maintenance and safety, you can do this, do something else, or do nothing. And I wasn’t interested in ‘do nothing.’” Mayor Hales said. “These proposals come from community members who stepped up and designed a great plan.”

Businesses will pay between $3 and $144 per month, with a 50 percent discount for non-profits, under an approach developed by a business workgroup, which included representatives from Venture Portland and the Portland Business Alliance.

Individuals, meanwhile, will pay rates related to their ability to pay. For example, a couple making between $40,000 and $60,000 per year will pay $5 per month, while a couple making between $60,000 and $75,000 per year will pay $7.50 per month.

The Portland Street Fund results from the Our Streets PDX transportation funding conversation that started in January. The City Council considered a Transportation User Fee in May, but decided to seek more public input on ways to reduce charges for low-income residents and businesses, and provide a discount for non-profits.

The fund will allocate 56 percent of net revenue to maintenance, and 44 percent to safety projects, with the understanding that many projects accomplish both goals. Just under 40 percent of the first three years of safety improvements will be made in East Portland.

“Preventive maintenance saves money in the long run,” Transportation Director Leah Treat said. “The Portland Street Fund will provide $45 million in the first three years, and at that rate after 10 years, we can avoid spending more than $650 million in more expensive road rebuilds. Our crews are working hard to provide the right treatment at the right place, at the right time.”

People with questions regarding this effort can contact project staff at ourstreetspdx@portlandoregon.gov. People also may join the conversation on Twitter, at @PBOTInfo and use the tag #ourstreetspdx.


Oregon League of Cities Op-Ed: Portland Prioritizes Maintenance, Safety Needs for Transportation

MONDAY, NOV. 3, 2014 -- Mayor Charlie Hales wrote about Portland's transportation needs in the Oregon League of Cities magazine, Local Focus. The issue was dedicated to transportation funding as a city issue. 

READ THE FULL ARTICLE, starting on page 20 of this PDF: http://www.orcities.org/Portals/17/Publications/localfocus/Nov2014web.pdf

An excerpt:

"For too long, the streets of Oregon’s largest city have withered under the wear and tear caused by population growth and years of deferred maintenance. Now, almost half of our busiest streets are rated in “poor” or “very poor” condition. We still have many neighborhoods where people don’t feel safe walking to a bus for lack of sidewalks and safe crossings.

We’ve talked about this for decades here in Portland. And while we have talked, 28 other Oregon cities have enacted street fees.

The time has come for Portland to act.

And act we must, because as city government leaders across Oregon know, transportation funding has been short for decades. The last time the federal gas tax was raised, Beanie Babies were the popular toy. That was 1993, when the gas tax was increased to 18.3 cents per gallon. If it had been adjusted for inflation over the years, the U.S. gas tax would be 30 cents today.

Not only has the federal gas tax not kept up with inflation, it hasn’t kept up with the demands of technology and our growing population. An audit by Oregon Secretary of State Kate Brown’s office this summer reported the trend toward fuel-efficient cars is reducing the gas tax revenue traditionally used to pay for transportation. Young people are less interested in driving than prior generations. As our cities grow, people expect public transit and safe bicycle options to get where they need to go.

When Oregonians consume less gas, they pay less into the system that maintains the streets they rely on. The state constitution prohibits us from spending gas tax dollars on public transit and many of the other needs of modern cities. The city of Portland supported the Legislature’s approval of gas tax and vehicle registration increases in 2009. While helpful, the city’s share was just enough to cover the debt service on our contribution to replacing the Sellwood Bridge, a regional asset."


Street Fee Package Handed to Council; Mayor Comments

MONDAY, OCT. 13, 2014 -- Mayor Charlie Hales, following the street fee work session this afternoon, commented on the progress of the street fee:

"I appreciate all the work that was done this summer to really “Portland-ize” this street funding proposal. We have come away with a much better product than we started with — one that provides revenue for street maintenance and safety improvements without being overly burdensome.

I’ll emphasize that this package would pay PART of the cost of street maintenance. We’re still counting on the Oregon State Legislature to adopt a bill to help properly fund our roads. We’re still counting on the federal government to pass legislation to raise the gas tax. We’re hoping taking this action will inspire action by two other levels of government.

The street fee work has now been handed back to Council. While a few criteria need to be finalized, we are close to putting a proposal together that I believe emphasizes fairness, while starting the process of repairing our system.

Ultimately, it’s not going to be a perfect mechanism, but I knew that when we began. But we’re within striking distance of something that’s fair for all Portlanders and that begins the critical work of repairing our biggest city asset: our streets."

More information:

Work group summary: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/504260
How money will be spent: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/65945


Chief of Staff talks Transportation Need in Portland

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 17, 2014 -- Gail Shibley, the mayor's chief of staff, at the Oregon Coast Economic Summit in August was interviewed about transportation needs in Portland -- how the mayor fulfilled the 100-mile paving promise, the street fee, and taking care of what we have and investing in what we need.

"In the city of Portland alone we have 56 miles of unpaved streets -- unpaved, nothing there, gravel. No sidewalks, no crossings for kids," Gail said. "Better streets are a real need -- a public safety need, a mobility need."


Congressman Calls on Mayor, Other Leaders Discuss Transportation Issues

TUESDAY, AUG. 5, 2014 — Mayor Charlie Hales on Monday joined some of the most influential leaders in transportation for in-depth discussion of funding streets, roads and highways at U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s “Forum on the Future of America’s Transportation Infrastructure.”

Mayor Hales on a street paver“Portland is in competition with other cities for quality of place — and other cities are being more aggressive, improving their streets, sidewalks, bikeways and public transportation,” Hales said. “When 40 percent of our streets are in ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’ condition, we need to do something.”

Blumenauer organized the forum to discuss federal, state, regional and city transportation funding issues, and to brainstorm ways to pay for transportation infrastructure outside of federal funding. Leaders also discussed “climate smart” transportation planning, emphasizing sustainable modes of transportation that also reduce wear and tear on roadways.

Ultimately, leaders said, transportation improvements boil down to more revenue. Representatives from trucking and associated industries supported higher taxes to pay for infrastructure, which would benefit their industries in the long run. Likewise, Hales said, Portlanders and Oregonians paying for their streets and sidewalks today will have long-term payoffs.

“Right now we call our highways in this country ‘freeways,’” Hales said. “That’s unrealistic. We’re going to have to get used to paying as we go. It’s taking care of the infrastructure we have and investing in long-term growth.”

In other parts of the country, sales tax and highway tolls pay for transportation and other needs. With the federal Highway Trust Fund stagnant at 1993 funding levels and inadequate state gas tax revenue, Hales said, eventually that also will be Oregon’s reality.

“We’ve gotten used to a state of affairs that can’t last,” he said.

The street fee proposed by Hales and Portland Bureau of Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick would raise the revenue for pavement maintenance, safe routes to schools, building sidewalks, improving crosswalks, and building protected bike lanes.

Community task forces are meeting this summer to help design the residential and non-residential fees. Council is slated to vote on the fee in November.

“It’s a clumsy method to raise revenue,” Hales said. “I’m open to other ideas that can raise the $53 million we need for streets. But so far, there hasn’t been a viable alternative.

“Streets are only getting worse. There are unpaved gravel roads in the city limits,” he added. “Potholes are driving neighborhoods crazy. Kids in some neighborhoods don’t have proper sidewalks or crosswalks. We need revenue to address these problems.” 


Mayor Hales, Commissioner Novick Agree to Pull Back Charter Amendment; Push Forward with Street Fee in 2015

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 2014 – A proposed change to the city charter from Portland Mayor Charlie Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick, designed to lock in the use of the proposed street fee for maintenance and safety, will be pulled off the table.

Mayor Hales at a town hall“The issue was confusing to people,” Hales said. “We listened to hours of testimony. We’ve received hundreds of emails and calls. Local media claim it confuses them. We’re listening. If the charter change is muddying the real message – that we must take care of our streets – then we’ll take it off the table.”

Hales and Novick have held 10 town hall meetings and have discussed a street fee at many City Council meetings this spring and summer. In 2012, Hales ran on making street maintenance a priority. And he’s talked about it since arriving in office 18 months ago.

“The independent auditor tells us we need more than $75 million per year to take care of the largest thing we own: our streets. We haven’t even gotten close to that. Our streets are in disrepair, the state and federal governments are not going to swoop in with a more robust gas tax to save us. It’s up to us.”

Hales and Novick are committed to ensuring that revenue from any new funding mechanism would be dedicated to improving the maintenance and safety of our city’s transportation network, including paving and sidewalks. The charter amendment that would go to voters in November is one way of codifying that commitment.

But residents who attended town halls, or who contacted the mayor’s office, have said the proposal is confusing.

“We don’t want any confusion on this: We have not taken care of our streets; we have to turn that around; we don’t have the millions-per-year necessary now to do it; no one else is going to do this except us; we need a street fee,” Hales said. “None of that has changed. We’re told that the charter amendment was adding confusion. So we’ll take that off the table for now, until we’ve reached a consensus on a funding proposal.”

Work groups will be created this summer to examine the best way to enact a residential fee and a non-residential fee. All meetings will be open to the public.

Hales and Novick expect a council vote on the transportation fee by this fall. It is expected to be enacted by July 2015.


Hundreds Line Up to Speak at 10th Street Fee Hearing

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 2014 – An estimated 120 people jammed into a community space at Kaiser Permanente Interstate on Wednesday to express their views on the proposed city street fee. Mayor Charlie Hales, Commissioner Steve Novick and Leah Treat, director of the city Transportation Bureau, sat through more than two hours of emotional testimony.

PBOT Director Leah TreatThe street fee has been proposed by Hales and Novick to address the backlog of maintenance and safety repairs to the city’s streets. Historic funding mechanisms – federal and state gas tax – have become woefully inadequate in the 21st century.

“Our options are to do this, to something else, or to do nothing,” Hales said, noting that more than 40 percent of the city’s streets are rated at “poor” to “very poor” condition. “Frankly, ‘doing nothing’ is not an option. I refused to leave this to our children and our grandchildren to pay for.”

Treat said the city formerly had repaired about 30 miles of street per year. Last year, Hales and Novick vowed to repair 100 miles – of the estimated 5,000 lane-miles owned by the city.

Transportation crews will hit the 100-mile mark within a week.

“At this rate, it would take 48 years to repair all our roads,” Treat said.

Hales and Novick are proposing a street fee for residents and non-residents, to begin in July 2015. They have held 10 public hearings on the topic. Work groups for both the residential and non-residential will be formed this summer. All meetings will be open to the public.

“Nobody wants fees,” Hales said. “We hear you. But our largest asset is our streets. The feds won’t bail us out. The state won’t bail us out. It’s up to us.”


Street Fee: Residents Sound Off at Town Hall

TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 2014 — Business owners expressed their concerns, complaints, and support for a street fee Tuesday morning at the Oregon Convention Center during the ninth town hall addressing the mechanism proposed to improve Portland’s streets and sidewalks.

Mayor Hales, Commissioner NovickThe transportation user fee would raise around $53 million annually for street maintenance, safety and projects, such as paving gravel roads — less than the billion dollars in need, but enough to prevent street maintenance from becoming cost prohibitive in the future.

“We have not taken care of our largest asset: our streets,” Mayor Charlie Hales said. “If we do nothing, your children and your grandchildren will get the bill. And it will be much, much higher than it is today. We cannot do nothing.”

Mayor Hales, Commissioner Steve Novick and Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat noted people’s concerns about the flawed trip-generator model and regressive nature of the fee, as well as some suggestions for alternate sources of revenue — a 40-cent higher gas tax, tax on studded tires, and a sales tax. Some business owners asked to broaden the scope of the fee to raise more revenue.

Most of the 30 speakers acknowledged a need to improve streets; one speaker read a news story about potholes in Southwest Portland, and several business owners said they were aware that better streets and sidewalks are good for business.

The town hall drew about 140 people. A 10th town hall to discuss the residential fee will be Wednesday, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Kaiser Permanente’s Town Hall, 3704 N. Interstate Ave. 


Street Fee Town Hall Moves to Larger Venue

JUNE 20, 2014 – With higher-than-expected interest in the transportation funding proposal, the Portland Bureau of Transportation has decided to relocate Tuesday’s town hall to the Oregon Convention Center, Portland Ballroom 255.

The event is free and open to the public. The Tuesday meeting is intended to focus on how the transportation fee would work for businesses, non-profits and other non-residential land uses. Participants are encouraged to discuss ways improve the proposal or suggest alternative ways of raising money for transportation safety and maintenance. A Wednesday night meeting will focus on the fee for households.

Participants will discuss a proposed charter amendment, which would go to voters in November, and which would lock in the use of the utility fee money for transportation only.

“Portlanders are passionate about participating in local government,” Mayor Charlie Hales said. “We welcome ideas about how they want to improve the transportation fee, or alternative proposals on par with the $53 million it would raise. There’s no question we need to invest in basic transportation maintenance and safety.”

The Tuesday event is the first of two town halls coming up:


Town Hall on Business and Non-Residential Fee: 8 to 9:30 a.m., Tuesday, June 24, at Oregon Convention Center, Portland Ballroom 255, 777 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Directions and visitor info.

 
Town Hall on Residential Fee: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 25, at Kaiser Permanente’s Town Hall, 3704 N Interstate Ave.

The town hall meetings will provide an opportunity for the public to speak with transportation staff, ask questions and make comments to Mayor Hales, Commissioner Steve Novick and Transportation Director Leah Treat.

The City Council delayed the proposal June 4, after five months of Our Streets PDX town halls, online surveys, advisory committee meetings and a five-hour public hearing May 29. Two upcoming town halls will kick off the next phase of outreach through October, designed to gather input to address the needs of businesses, non-profits and low-income households.

For more information about the Our Streets PDX funding conversation and the proposed Transportation User Fee, see the project web page: www.ourstreetspdx.com.

See updated information on the proposed fee the council amended May 29:

Updated online calculator: PBOT has updated an online calculator that estimates the monthly fee for residential and non-residential ratepayers. PBOT has updated the web calculator from the proposed $11.56 fee to the 3-year phase-in starting at $6 a month for single-family properties.

Transportation User Fee rate details: Details on the way the fee is calculated, to help business owners find the right information.

Frequently Asked Questions: This series of questions and answers will help the public learn more about why the fee was proposed and what it would pay for.

Email us for more information at TUF_Administrator@portlandoregon.gov

Talk about it on twitter, using hashtag #ourstreetspdx or see @pbotinfo


Street Fee: Council Vote Delayed, but Not Fee Itself

TUESDAY, JULY 3, 2014 -- The proposal by Mayor Charlie Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick to launch a street fee in 2015 remains on schedule. However, the council vote on how to structure the fee will be pushed back until November.

"We have not taken care of our largest asset: our streets. We have to change that," Mayor Hales said. "We’ve been talking about this for 13 years, and we held several town halls this winter and spring to hear from people. Despite that, many constituents still haven’t been heard yet. We get that. Postponing the Council vote will give people time to weigh in on whether this is the best solution to this dire need, and to consider changes to make it work better."

"The last street fee proposal in 2008 was derailed by a lobbyist filing a referendum petition," said Commissioner Novick. "This one has been temporarily delayed due to concerns voiced by small business owners and low-income people and advocates. We are in a hurry to get to work, but if we’re going to be delayed, it’s for the right reasons."

The City Council on Wednesday will still vote on referring a charter change that would lock in the use of any street fee for transportation purposes. "Voters need to be assured that we will spend this money the way we say we will," Hales said. "A charter change will ensure that we stay true to that commitment, administration after administration."

However, the council vote on both the residential fee, and the non-residential fee, will be pushed back to November.

Further public forums will be scheduled to hear from residents and the business community.

And two work groups will be formed. Their charges:

● To analyze city policy regarding low-income residents and fees. The work group will look at the street fee as well as fees for other city utilities, including water and sewer, to see how well low-income residents are being served and how widely discounts can be applied.

● To further engage with small business, nonprofit and government partners on design and implementation of the fee.

"Think of this as a track race," Hales said. "We haven’t moved the finish line, which is July 2015. But we’re moving the starting blocks. We heard from the community: We are taking our time to hear a more robust debate on the details of this fee. But we have not wavered in our resolve. It is our intention to finally address our deteriorating streets."

Portland wins worldwide honors for climate action plan

Portland is among worldwide honorees for climate action plan – other winners include Amsterdam, London, NYC, Seoul

TUESDAY, SEPT. 23, 2014 – Portland is among 10 cities worldwide to receive the City Climate Leadership Awards 2014. The Awards honor cities all over the world for excellence in urban sustainability and leadership in the fight against climate change.

Mayor HalesSiemens and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group – or C40 – announced the winners Monday evening at a ceremony in New York City. They are:

• Amsterdam: Finance & Economic Development

• Barcelona: Intelligent City Infrastructure

• Buenos Aires: Solid Waste Management

• London: Carbon Measurement & Planning and Air Quality

• Melbourne: Adaptation & Resilience

• New York City: Energy Efficient Built Environment

• Portland: Sustainable Communities

• Seoul: Green Energy

• Shenzhen: Urban Transportation

“Portland stands proudly alongside the global megacities that make up the C40,” Mayor Charlie Hales said. “We're delighted to have the honor and recognition that the Portland’s Healthy Connected City approach has proven to be a powerful carbon-reduction strategy.”

Eduardo Paes, mayor of Rio de Janeiro and chairman of the C40 group, praised the honorees. “I commend the winning cities for their leadership and commitment, and am confident that their knowledge and experience will help drive other cities to implement on-the-ground solutions faster and more efficiently. Through cooperation and collaboration, cities continue to deliver the results that are having a global impact.”

Susan AndersonHales praised Susan Anderson, director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, and Michael Armstrong, senior sustainability manager, along with outside partners ranging from Metro to Multnomah County to the state government. He said the private sector plays a huge role in the honor as well.

“In Portland, the basic idea is to develop the centers of our existing neighborhoods into highly walkable, lively commercial districts, making it easy and convenient to get to the schools, shops, jobs, parks, coffee and beer that make Portland a great place to live, work and play,” Hales said.

Portland’s plan also calls for offering new housing opportunities so even more residents can live in complete neighborhoods. And then connecting these neighborhoods with low-carbon transportation options.

“We are about to complete the first new bridge in downtown Portland in 30 years, and it will carry light rail, streetcar, buses, bicycles and pedestrians … but not private vehicles,” Hales said this spring, while addressing the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Chicago. “This is the kind of investment we are making to make our healthy connected city a reality.”

The winners were celebrated at an Awards Ceremony featuring C40 Board President Michael R. Bloomberg and Gro Harlem Brundtland, former Norwegian Prime Minister. The event brought together more than 250 decision-makers from cities around the world including national leaders, mayors, city planners, policy makers and representatives from the business world.

Josh Alpert, special projects adviser to Mayor Hales, attended to accept the award.

The award-winning cities were selected for the following actions:

Sustainable Communities recipient: Portland for its ‘Healthy Connected

City’ network. The city is developing “complete neighborhoods” to give all residents safe and convenient access to the goods and services needed in daily life. In 2012, 45 percent of the Portland population lived in complete neighborhoods, a figure which the city aims to raise to 80 percent by 2035.

The city’s ambitious and successful initiative shows a unique and valuable pathway to sustainable, resilient, and low carbon communities.

 

Finance and Economic Development recipient: Amsterdam for its

‘Investment Fund’. With this innovative project the city demonstrates how environmental and climate protection initiatives can be effectively incorporated into a city’s economic development strategy. Amsterdam designed a powerful financing instrument of USD 103 million to be invested in sustainable energy projects, some of them focusing on small businesses.

The fund lowers energy bills for citizens and businesses and contributes to

Amsterdam’s overall CO2 reduction targets: In 2010, the city had already achieved a 20 percent reduction, compared to 1990 levels.

Intelligent City Infrastructure recipient: Barcelona for its ‘Urban Platform’. This project introduces a new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) architecture that provides a single platform, which interconnects the entire city. The platform enables the city to manage resources efficiently and reduce the impact of urban infrastructure on the environment. It will help the city save energy and reduce pollution thanks to sensors monitoring water levels for irrigation, garbage containers, parking, people flow, energy efficiency in city buildings, etc. The program is also geared towards citizen engagement and features a web platform called “GO” (Open Government), which publishes all data publicly.

 

Solid Waste Management recipient: Buenos Aires for its ‘Solid Urban

Waste Reduction Project’. This project is not only improving the city’s cleanliness, but it is also a well-integrated and easily replicable strategy that includes strong citizen engagement and job growth. The city has committed to reducing waste sent to landfill by 83 percent by 2017, achieving this through an ambitious waste treatment program based on waste separation at origin, recovery, recycling and valorization. The city’s efforts have already resulted in a significant reduction of waste sent to landfills.

 

Carbon Measurement and Planning recipient: London for its assessment of city-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2012 and 2013, the

Greater London Authority (GLA) took a holistic approach to measuring GHG emissions. It was the first city worldwide to report direct and indirect city wide GHG emissions following internationally recognized GHG accounting and reporting principles. The effort builds on the C40 and partners’ Global

Protocol for Community-scale GHG Emissions (GPC) (in which London was also a pilot city), including a wider range of indirect emissions and a separate consumption-based methodology.

 

Air Quality recipient: London for its ‘New Taxi for London’ project. Transport accounts for 60 percent of all air pollutant emissions in London. This project seeks to develop new zero emission-capable vehicles with manufacturers; it will use GPS-based geofencing to switch hybrid vehicles to its zero emission drive cycle and will provide a range of innovative financing solutions. The aim of the project is to reduce emissions from the city’s iconic black taxi fleet by up to 100 percent in central London and around 75 percent in the rest of the city. Since the introduction of age limits more than 3,000 of the oldest taxis have been retired and from 2018 all taxis will be newly licensed. This project is a unique approach of aligning the Government Office for low emission vehicles, the European Investment Bank and the UK Green Investment Bank.

Adaptation and Resilience recipient: Melbourne for its ‘Urban Landscapes Climate Adaptation Program’. By increasing green space to 7.6 percent of municipal space and doubling the tree canopy, the program’s goal is to cool the city by 4°C and reduce drought vulnerability using green infrastructure. The city’s actions have already led to the planting of 12,000 new trees and the addition of 10,000 square meters of green space. The program includes running extensive citizen engagement initiatives, which together with the other actions provide a wide range of benefits including improved air quality and city resilience, reduced energy demand, and reduced heat-related illness and morbidity.

Energy Efficient Built Environment recipient: New York for its ‘Greener, Greater Buildings Plan’ and New York City ‘Carbon Challenge’ program.

Launched to back up New York’s environmental goal of reducing citywide GHG emissions by 30 percent by 2030, these programs benefit building owners through energy savings, and improve both air quality and public health. By reducing an estimated 5 percent of GHG emissions, this program can save the city USD 7 billion in energy costs and create roughly 17,800 jobs over the next 10 years. The NYC Carbon Challenge is designed to reduce emissions by more than 600,000 metric tons by the end of the program.

 

Green Energy recipient: Seoul for its ‘Make Seoul a City of Sunlight’ project. The city is building more photovoltaic facilities, targeting a reduction of greenhouse emissions as well as the city’s heavy dependence on fossil fuels, oil and nuclear and coal power plants. This project is part of the ‘One

Less Nuclear Power Initiative’, designed to reduce the city’s energy demand by two million tons of oil equivalent, which is the same amount as the output of one nuclear plant. Seoul’s aim is to function as a huge solar power plant and create energy independent communities.

 

Urban Transportation Award recipient: Shenzhen, for its ‘New Energy Vehicle Promotion’ project. As of December 2013, Shenzhen has introduced a new energy vehicle fleet of more than 6,000 units, making it the largest zero-emissions fleet in service worldwide. The project aims to add 35,000 new energy vehicles to the fleet in the next two years and to reach a zero emission ecosystem in the long term. Between 2009 and 2013, this program has cut CO2 emissions by 160,000 tones, leading to the city being ranked in the top 10 for best air quality in China according to China’s Environment Agency.

About the Awards competition:

This year marks the second collaboration between C40 and Siemens on this awards competition, which recognizes innovative city driven climate actions. Cities around the world submitted 87 applications. An independent, seven-member judging panel consisting of former city mayors, architects, representatives of the World Bank, as well as C40 and Siemens evaluated 31 projects in 26 cities as award finalists.

The City Climate Leadership Awards are part of a broader collaboration between Siemens and C40, announced in New York City in April 2013. In addition to the Awards, Siemens supports the C40 Measurement and Planning Initiative –an effort dedicated to enhancing each member city’s ability to measure data, take action and track progress towards self-identified goals. Siemens’ technical expertise is directly available to C40’s robust network of cities.

Fire Bureau Supports Portland Sister City Guadalajara

Portland Connects with Sister City Guadalajara on Both Sides of the Border

THURSDAY, AUG. 28, 2014 — Mayor Charlie Hales this week talked livable cities with a delegation of business and government officials visiting from Guadalajara, Mexico — less than a week after Portland Fire & Rescue made its own splash in the sister city.

PF&R trucks roll into Guadalajara.

Since 1983, Portland has maintained the sister city relationship with Guadalajara through cultural, educational and economic exchanges. The delegation’s trip to Portland lays the groundwork for stronger ties — e.g. a new air service scheduled to start in October. Volaris Airlines will provide a direct air service between the two cities.

This week the delegation — including officials from the city, as well as from the state of Jalisco and from businesses such as Mundo Cuervo, the distillery that makes Jose Cuervo — toured Portland’s sustainable features and met with local businesses. The group was interested in learning about Portland’s best practices to advance the livable city movement.

 “These relationships are so important,” Mayor Hales said. “Maintaining ties for over three decades makes both cities richer in culture, trade and education.”

Portland in Guadalajara

PF&R celebrates handing off fire trucks to Guadalajara.

Last week, Portland’s presence was felt in Guadalajara: The city accepted a fire engine and a ladder truck from Portland Fire & Rescue, the third such donation since 1999. Guadalajara Director of International Relations Mario Reynoso via Twitter thanked the city for its donation, which arrived Aug. 22, Mexico’s National Firefighters Day.

The mayor and City Council approved the donation in November 2013, but there was nine months of international red tape to work through before the trucks could be delivered to Guadalajara.

Before Portland Fire started training and equipment donation with Guadalajara 15 years ago, the city had four stations serving 1.5 million people; Portland has 30 stations for 600,000 people. Now Guadalajara has 17 stations across the city, allowing firefighters to respond to calls within 5 minutes instead of up to 45 minutes.

“This makes a huge difference for them,” said Portland Fire & Rescue Lt. Joe Troncosso. “The only way to keep those stations is with equipment.

“These trucks started on the front lines here; then they were back-up; then they sat unused in the lot. Now, they’re back on the front lines again, doing what they’re supposed to: save lives.”