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Mayor Charlie Hales

City of Portland Mayor Charlie Hales

Phone: 503-823-4120

1221 SW 4th Avenue, Room 340, Portland, OR 97204

National Night Out

Mayor Celebrates Community Safety, Unity at National Night Out Events

 

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 6, 2014 — Jordan, 3, looked apprehensively at the plume of hamburger-scented smoke rising from the grill.

Jordan, Firefighter Matt Fullerton

“Fire! Fire!” he shouted, looking up at the Portland Fire and Rescue firefighters towering behind him. “It’s hot!”

“The kid’s a natural,” said Battalion Chief Mark Kaiel. “He’s got a future.”

Firefighters with Station 2, Truck 2 on Tuesday evening were at Columbia Ridge Apartments for the Wilkes neighborhood National Night Out event, one of about 100 citywide. Since 1983, on the second Tuesday in August residents nationwide gather in their neighborhoods to demonstrate their commitment to safety and community. Law enforcement and emergency services attend events in their neighborhoods.

“This crew responds to this complex a few times a year,” Kaiel said. “It’s good for residents to see these guys outside of a crisis. And it’s good for the crew to see residents in a fun environment.”

Mayor Charlie Hales attended several National Night Out events Tuesday to talk with residents in an informal setting, sharing food, meeting kids, and hearing about the neighborhood.

Nhu To-Haynes, Mayor Hales, First Lady Hales, Nyla Tu-Haynes, Olivia Tu-Haynes

“These events are a fantastic way to get people out into their neighborhoods,” Hales said. “A united neighborhood strengthens the fabric of community — critical for safety and prosperity.”

At Wilkes in East Portland, kids clamored in and out of a fire truck, handing their cellphones to firefighter Matt Fullerton to snap a photo.

In a Cully neighborhood apartment complex, Clara Vista Apartments, kids took over a police car, finding the button for the lights, the PA system, and — to the panic of police officers — the radio.

“No emergency,” Portland Police Officer Graham said into this chest radio, “just some kids.” He turned to the car: “OK, guys, time to get out.”

At the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) in far Northeast Portland, kids from widely varied backgrounds ran around the gym with bouncy balls and hula hoops, pausing for face painting or to pull a block from the giant Jenga game.

At Binford Condominium Association’s event in Northeast Portland, former State Sen. Avel Gordly chatted with the mayor and First Lady over bratwurst and fruit. Used books were out for the taking, and kids ran around the expansive yard, pausing to smack a piñata and feed a parrot.

Marigold HydroPark hosted Southwest Portland’s Markham neighborhood event. Families gathered at picnic tables full of food and kids played with enough soccer balls to keep them dashing about.

parrot

In South Burlingame Park, the band Still Kickin’ — comprised of friends who’ve been jamming for nine years — played as children explored a fire engine, snatching stickers from firefighters Shannon Ellison and Josh Clemmer.  

“National Night Out celebrates neighborhood safety and unity,” Hales said. “Look around — it’s working. People are having fun, hanging out. What a great, worthwhile event.” 

Daimler Breaks Ground on Portland Headquarters Building

Daimler Breaks Ground on Portland Headquarters Building

 

FRIDAY, JULY 18, 2014 – Mayor Charlie Hales and Gov. John Kitzhaber were on hand Friday for the ceremonial groundbreaking of the $150 million Daimler Trucks North America headquarters on Swan Island.

Governor, Martin Daum, Mayor

Martin Daum, president and CEO of Daimler Trucks North America, spoke about the choice of Portland for the expanded facility.

“Daimler is a good corporate neighbour,” Hales said. “They get the spirit of Portland. I’ve heard Martin Daum talk about it before, and he’s right. Daimler and Portland are a perfect fit.”

In 2012, Daimler and Western Star Trucks purchased $135 million from Oregon vendors and suppliers. Daimler also supports area high schools, the Oregon Food Bank, the United Way and the Washington Park Summer Concert Series.Gov. Kitzhaber

A 265,000 square-foot building will bring together Daimler operations now scattered across several offices and will allow for growth. Daimler plans to add another 400 employees to its Portland work force.Mayor, Bill Wyatt of Port of Portland, Martin Daum

The project also includes opening a greenway trail along the Willamette River and construction of a parking garage. The company has partnered with Ankrom Moisan for the architectural design and Hoffman Corporation for construction. 

Link to Gov. Kitzhaber’s comments at ground breaking.

City Takes on Parks Bond Proposal Today

Replacement Bond Would Benefit Parks Throughout City

THURSDAY, JULY 24, 2014 – The Portland City Council today put the final touches on a parks bond measure, to go to voters in November.

Parks sceneThe replacement bond would address critical park needs without increasing tax rates from what they are today, by continuing to fund parks at the current rate required by an expiring 1994 bond.

“This is the right thing to do, and the right time to do it,” Mayor Charlie Hales said. “Under the leadership of Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz, we can raise an estimated $56 million to $68 million in funding to address the most critical needs of our city’s beloved parks system.”

The details of the proposal can be found here.

“This represents the most urgent needs - the things that are breaking or are already broken,” Commissioner Fritz said. 

What Are You Looking At?

Nominate your favorite view or gazing spot through Aug. 8 to be part of the City's scenic resources update

TUESDAY, JULY 15, 2014 – Portland is known for its iconic views: the city’s skyline and Mount Hood, the many bridges, buildings and fountains all help define the character of the city. These views leave a lasting impression on residents and visitors alike. 

Vista BridgeTo preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of views, viewpoints and view corridors within and of the Central City. This inventory is now 25 years old.

The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is updating it as part of the Central City 2035 planning effort and needs need your help. Now through Aug. 8, city staff are taking nominations for new views, viewpoints and view corridors.

The Central City Scenic Resources Map shows the viewpoints and view corridors from the current inventories. Much has changed since the last comprehensive inventory was created in 1988 — the Pearl District has been developed, Tillikum Crossing is just about finished — and there are likely new views that should be considered for future protection.

What views can be nominated?

● The viewpoint or view corridor – where you are when you enjoy the view – must be on public property or have public access.

● The feature that is viewed also must be in public ownership. Private buildings are not included in this inventory.

How can nominations be submitted?

You can nominate a view by completing the online nomination form on the Scenic Resources Inventory website. You will need to provide information about: 1) where the viewpoint or view corridor is located; 2) what the view is of; and 3) why you think it should be included in the inventory.

Next steps: All of the inventoried views, viewpoints and view corridors will be evaluated in Fall 2014 and ranked based on their significance or importance. The results of the study will inform discussions through the Central City 2035 plan about how to protect and manage views and viewpoints.

2014-15 Budget Approved

Budget Puts Focus on Homelessness, Emergency Preparedness, Complete Neighborhoods

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 – The Portland City Council on Wednesday passed Mayor Charlie Hales’ budget for 2014-15. The $3.58 billion budget passed on a 5-0 vote.

“Last year we righted the ship. This year, we begin steering it toward addressing the issues of homelessness, emergency preparedness and making neighborhoods complete,” Hales said.Mayor Hales

Details of the budget can be found at the City Budget Office website.

The budget must be approvied by the Tax Supervising and Conservation Commission of Multnomah County, then returns to the City Council for final adoption in June.

This is Portland’s first “stabilization” budget after years of cuts.

Hales has been in office just 17 months. During that time, he and the council passed a budget that eradicated last year’s $21.5 million shortfall; cut 142 full-time equivalent positions; retained the city’s best-in-the-nation bond rating; set aside funding to pay down millions of dollars in city debt; and made the city’s first-ever substantial revamping of Urban Renewal Areas, which put an estimated $1.06 billion worth of property back on the tax rolls, benefiting the city, Multnomah County and public schools.

This year, the city has slightly more than $9 million in discretionary funds to allocate, above the cost of ongoing city services. This revenue growth includes $4.6 million in ongoing funds, and $4.7 million in one-time funds. Hales focused much of that discretionary funding on his three priorities.

He allocated $2.25 million for homelessness, including $1 million for more outreach, referral and permanent housing for those now homeless and programs for youth homelessness. An additional $1 million would go for the Housing Investment Fund, which leverages federal and other money to build more units of affordable housing.

He allocated $1.42 million for emergency preparedness, including funds for improving the community emergency notification system and regional disaster preparedness. The budget calls for a $1.2 million investment in the Jerome Sears Facility, to begin developing the city-owned property into a West Side emergency operations facility. 

And he allocated $2.25 million to help make neighborhoods complete, including new and ongoing funding for the Schools Uniting Neighborhoods, or SUN, program. Additional SUN Schools under the Mayor’s proposal include adding 10 new schools to the 70 SUN schools operating now, and providing permanent funding for five sites that faced expiring grants.

The budget also includes funding for the East Portland Action Plan and key investments in livability programs in the Office of Neighborhood Involvement and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

The approved budget includes:

● Continued funding for the TriMet Youth Pass for Portland Public School students.

● Summer internships for youths.

● Funds to support survivors of sex trafficking.

● Funding for the Earl Boyles Early Learning Center in East Portland.

● The Mayor’s Black Male Achievement initiative.

● The Diversity and Civic Leadership Program within the Office of Neighborhood Involvement.

● Funding for Southeast Works.

● A VOZ day laborers’ work center.

● The annual Symphony in the Park celebration.

● Additional funding for the Regional Arts and Culture Council.

● An equity position within Portland Police, to manage operations and activities designed to increase diversity, equity, empowerment, inclusion and cultural proficiency of the Police Bureau.

The most ambitious element of the mayor’s budget is the critical re-thinking of urban renewal areas: sectors of the city set aside to address blight. Under Oregon law, a city may draw boundaries around urban renewal areas, temporarily freeze property taxes that go to other governments, and use any incremental property tax revenue growth to stimulate development and investment. When urban renewal areas expire, the property tax value of their enhanced developments then flow back to the city, county, schools and other taxing jurisdictions.

By eliminating and shrinking urban renewal areas, the mayor’s budget returns an estimated $1.06 billion onto the tax rolls, and provides approximately $5 million to the city, county and school budgets this year, growing to approximately $6 million in 2015-16.

That proposal breaks down to an immediate increase of an estimated $1.5 million into the city’s 2014-15 budget – almost 17 percent of the additional $9 million in new discretionary funds, without raising taxes.

Another centerpiece of the Mayor’s budget is the city/county agreement crafted by Mayor Hales and Marissa Madrigal, chair of the Multnomah County Commission. Hales credits Madrigal’s strong leadership for making the accord work.

The City Council will hold the first hearing for ordinances that adopt solid waste collection, water, sewer and storm water recycling rates for fiscal year 2014-15. The utility rate hearing is 2 p.m. Thursday, May 22, in the Council Chamber, City Hall, 1221 S.W. Fourth Ave. It is open to the public.

The City Council is expected to vote on the mayor’s approved budget by the end of May. The 2014-15 fiscal year starts July 1.