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Neighborhood Involvement

Building inclusive, safe and livable neighborhoods and communities.

ONI Main: 503-823-4519

City/County Info: 503-823-4000

TDD: 503-823-6868

1221 SW 4th Ave, Suite 110, Portland, OR 97204

Learn how to hold the best block party ever

National Night Out Info Fair on Thursday, July 9th, 5:30pm at Laurelhurst Park

Would you like to learn more about National Night Out (NNO) or are you looking for ideas for your neighborhood party? The City of Portland’s Crime Prevention Program is hosting a National Night Out (NNO) Information Fair on Thursday, July 9th in Laurelhurst Park (North of the pond on SE Ankeny) from 5:30-7:30pm. Learn how to close a street, reserve a park, or get a noise variance for your party! Learn new party games for kids and grown ups alike!  

National Night Out is an annual celebration where the community gathers at small block parties or neighborhood events to strengthen their relationships with one another and public safety officials in the spirit of creating safer neighborhoods. When neighbors get to know each other at NNO and block parties, they create a connected and safer community.

Crime Prevention, Parks Bureau, Noise Control, Portland Bureau of Transportation, neighborhood coalition offices and others will be on hand to answer questions about this annual event. The Portland Police and Fire Bureaus and the Mayor will also join the festivities. There will be a short awards ceremony honoring volunteers who make a difference in their neighborhoods. Food and drinks will be served.

Please join us at our kid-friendly gathering!

For more info on NNO, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/nno

National Night Out Info Fair flyer

Crime Prevention at Your Place of Worship

Security considerations for faith groups

Communities of Faith Meeting

Photo: Training for NW faith groups with the Crime Prevention Program,

Portland Police Bureau, District Attorney's Office

Have security measures been implemented at your place of worship? Do they include a range of considerations from burglary prevention, staff and volunteer background checks, key control to protocols for a crisis on site?

Security can sometimes be an afterthought for communities of faith. Staff and volunteers are often stretched thin with multiple obligations. Some congregants may feel that security imposes barriers to connecting, creating a welcoming place and helping others. However, providing a safe environment for staff, members and guests is just as an important function as providing for the various needs of the community. 

“The built environment incentivizes or discourages bad behavior”, said Jacob Brostoff, Crime Prevention Coordinator, at a recent meeting with NW faith groups. Incorporating security measures into the design, improvement, and maintenance of the property can help prevent crime and livability issues. Consider some of the following steps:

  • Make your property more visible so that problem activities can be observed by staff, members, guests, and neighbors. 
  • Improve the security hardware and take other measures to prevent criminal access, especially to entry points and vulnerable areas of your property. 
  • Define where your property begins and establish expectations of its use. 

Work with your organization’s staff to evaluate the overall security of your property. Portland groups can contact the City of Portland's Crime Prevention Program for assistance.We have recently created a security checklist for Communities of Faith. You can find it here: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/article/526450 

City of Portland's Crime Prevention Program

503-823-4064

onicpa@portlandoregon.gov

Neighbors Form a Foot Patrol to Tackle Crime and Livability Issues

How Foot Patrols can make a difference

Foot PatrolNeighbors walking

Wanting to feel safe walking the docks at night, neighbors and businesses of the Riverplace Esplanade contacted the City of Portland’s Crime Prevention Program for assistance. Based on neighbor concerns about trash, drug dealing, thefts, harassment, and livability issues on the City-owned docks, Mark Wells, Community Organizing Specialist, offered to help them organize a Foot Patrol. Fifteen trained residents joined Crime Prevention, Multnomah County Sheriff’s River Patrol, a Portland Police Sergeant, and Portland Park Rangers for their first walk yesterday. Serving as a positive presence and active reporters of problems in their neighborhood, these involved residents are sure to make an impact.

Neighbors typically contact Crime Prevention to get a Foot Patrol going in response to crime and livability concerns at a park, school, or other area. Neighbors can also form one proactively and are advised to do so for vulnerable areas. The goal of a Community Foot Patrol is to engage in a long-term sustained effort that is as much about building community as it is about addressing the particular crime and livability issues. To initiate one, there should be approximately 10-15 people willing to attend a two hour training. Says Wells, “With Foot Patrols, people walk a geographic area and work very closely with law enforcement. They are trained to be good witnesses and callers, and to be a visible presence. It’s not just helpful to deter criminal activity, but it’s equally important for the positive users of the property to see the Foot Patrollers walking, to know that there are community members who really care and keep tabs on things”. Wells emphasizes that patrols are non-confrontational and not about vigilantism. “It’s being trained on how to observe suspicious activity, how to keep a safe distance, how to avoid confrontation at all costs.”

The reality is that law enforcement agencies are not able to be everywhere and will not know the community as well as the people living there. The visible presence of the patrols communicates to the criminal element that their activities will be observed and the immediate reporting of issues will translate into problems being addressed more readily. Lieutenant Travis Gullberg of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s River Patrol says this about patrols, “They enhance our ability to know what’s going on in the community. We can’t be everywhere. If you can partner with private citizens to help do the Foot Patrols, it adds to the services we provide and benefits the community, keeping them safe.”

If you are interested in starting a Neighborhood Watch or Foot Patrol in your Portland neighborhood, contact Mark Wells at Mark.Wells@portlandoregon.gov, 503-823-2781. See our brochure Establishing Your Community Foot Patrol at http://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/article/320556

Record Your Serial Number and Get Your Bike Back

How documenting your bike can faciliate recovery if it's lost or stolen

Unclaimed Bikes in the Police Property Room

Over 400 bicycles are currently languishing in the Portland Police Bureau’s property room waiting to be claimed, and this is the slow season. When the weather improves and more Portlanders start biking, Jacob Gittlen, Police Property Evidence Division, expects that number to significantly increase. If the owners of these bikes had reported the theft to the police, using a serial number or other identifier, we might see more empty racks in this warehouse. Be proactive and record your serial number now to improve the chances that you’ll be reunited with your bike if it’s lost or stolen.

"I can safely say that in the last five years, I have seen hundreds of bicycles that were probably stolen and weren’t reported", says Neighborhood Response Team Officer Robert Brown who serves the East Portland community. He described a drug investigation at an apartment unit where dozens of bicycles were found in various states of disrepair. Given the criminal history of the suspects and the number of bikes stored in a small space, he was certain that all of them were stolen. However, none of the serial numbers that he checked against a State and National law enforcement database were reported missing. Since he couldn’t prove the bikes were stolen, the suspects were not charged with a crime, nor could he return the bikes to their rightful owner.

When bicycles are transferred to the Portland Police property room or recovered by the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), Abandoned Bike Program, staff scour State and National databases, Craigslist and independent bike registries to find an owner. To make it easier for them to discover who a bike belongs to, the owner needs to know some important information about their property, mainly the serial number.

Officer Sanders of Central Precinct advises bike owners to collect the following information and keep it on file:

  • Serial Number, which is typically located on the bottom bracket where the two pedal cranks meet
  • Color, make and model
  • Photos
  • Engraved markings on your bike such as your Driver’s License Number if there is no serial number. Drivers’ licenses are easily identifiable and researched by the police, especially if you include the state code i.e. OR for Oregon.
  • Any peculiarities about your bike that make it unique such as custom pedals or taped handlebars.

Ideally if your bike is lost or stolen, you can readily access this information and report it to the police. You can choose to write it down, create a spreadsheet, or email the details along with a photo to yourself. Just be sure to store it in safe place at home or online.

Another great option is to record your bike serial number now at www.EndBikeTheft.org. This quick and simple action substantially increases the chances that you’ll recover your bike if it’s lost or stolen. You input your serial number along with the make and model of your bike and the automatic email generator on PBOT’s webpage will send these details to you for your records. Additionally, there are a number of independent registries such as Bikeindex.org or Project529.com that make it easy to proactively register your bike and send out alerts if it’s stolen. The police, pawn shops, and others may be able to access the data on the registries to check if a bike is stolen. 

By taking these measures, you’ll have quick access to the serial number and can swiftly file a police report if your bike is lost or stolen. To report an incident in Portland, call the police non-emergency number at 503-823-3333 or file online at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/cor/

Danielle Booth, of PBOT’s Abandoned Bicycle Program, sums it up, "Often the bikes I impound are well maintained and I’m certain that someone in our city is missing their bike, but without a serial number, police report or web listing, I’m unable to connect the bike to owner". Take action today and make the connection possible so that you can get your bike back where it belongs.

New location for popular Landlord Forum

Starting in March '14, the Landlord Forum will move to East Precinct

Landlord Forum logo

For almost two years, our monthly Landlord Forum has been held in the community room at Southeast Precinct at 47th and E. Burnside. The Forum has gained attendance to the point that the room was becoming uncomfortable. Starting with the March forum, on March 20th 2014, the Landlord Forum will now be held at East Precinct's community room.  East Precinct is located at 737 SE 106th Avenue, just south of SE Washington. East Precinct has free parking at the East Portland Community Center lot across the street, as well as on-street parking, and is conveniently located off of I-205's Stark/Washington exit.