Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

Neighborhood Involvement

Building inclusive, safe and livable neighborhoods and communities.

ONI Main: 503-823-4519

City/County Info: 503-823-4000

TDD: 503-823-6868

1221 SW 4th Ave, Suite 110, Portland, OR 97204

Subscribe to RSS feed

Most Recent

View More

SE Division & 6th Sewer Replacement Project Update

Environmental Services – your sewer and stormwater service provider – will replace and increase capacity for about 270 feet of public sewer pipes on SE Division Place between SE 6th and SE 7th avenues. The pipes are between 95 and 106 years old. This project will increase sewer capacity and reduce the risks of sewage releases to homes and streets.

SE Division Place and 6th Avenue Sewer Replacement Project Update: July 24, 2015

Environmental Services – your sewer and stormwater service provider – will replace and increase capacity for about 270 feet of public sewer pipes on SE Division Place between SE 6th and SE 7th avenues. The pipes are between 95 and 106 years old. This project will increase sewer capacity and reduce the risks of sewage releases to homes and streets.

The work will include replacing storm drains, a manhole and service laterals from the curb to the sewer main.

A project map is available at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/divisionplace.

DEVELOPMENTS OF NOTE

All appears to be going well with the lane restriction during our work hours. Pipe installation is moving quickly and is currently on schedule for completion by November this year.

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE
Below is the anticipated construction schedule for the next few weeks. We will update and expand the schedule each week as we receive information from the project contractor. The schedule is subject to change due to a variety of factors, including underground conditions, weather, subcontractor schedules and availability of materials. The project is scheduled to be completed in November 2015.

As the contractor moves forward installing pipe, work crews apply a temporary asphalt patch. They will return at a later date to apply permanent paving.

Week of July 27 through Week of August 3

  • Continue installation of 30 inch pipe.
  • Replace lateral connections for buildings to both north and south side of Division Place.

Week of August 10

  • Tentatively scheduled to begin storm drain installation and storm connections to public sewer main.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING CONSTRUCTION

  • Work hours are 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and potentially some Saturdays.
  • There will be 24 hour by pass pumping during the entire project.
  • SE Division Place will remain one way east throughout the project during work hours.
  • Environmental Services has received a noise variance to work later hours if necessary.
  • Construction will create noise, vibration and dust and may disrupt normal neighborhood activity.
  • Traffic control signs will be set up. The contractor maintains local access, but expect delays.
  • Equipment and materials will be stored on nearby streets and in a staging area overnight.
  • A city inspector is on-site during work hours and may be able to assist you with construction concerns. Inspectors typically wear a City of Portland safety vest and hard hat.

Let us know if you have concerns such as business operations, disability issues or medical deliveries.

There will be periods of inactivity between construction phases.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Go to www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/divisionplace for more project information. To receive email updates about the project email joseph.annett@portlandoregon.gov with "Division Place" in the subject line.

Joe Annett

Community Outreach

City of Portland Environmental Services
1120 SW 5th Avenue, Room 1000, Portland, OR 97204

Phone: 503-823-6313

Email: Joseph.Annett@portlandoregon.gov

Working for clean rivers The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes.

The City of Portland complies with all non-discrimination laws including Title VI (Civil Rights) and Title II (ADA). To request a translation, accommodation or additional information, please call 503-823-7740, or use City TTY 503-823-6868, or Oregon Relay Service: 711

 

Southwest Ventilation Project Update: July 24, 2015

Construction has progressed to SW Virginia Avenue from SW Taylors Ferry Road in an Environmental Services project to reduce sewer odors and increase the capacity of the Southwest Parallel Interceptor sewer system. The project is designed to accommodate current needs and potential growth. Since February, the contractor has installed about 1,000 feet of 24-inch concrete pipe and 6 manholes along SW Taylors Ferry Road.

Southwest Ventilation Project Update: July 24, 2015

Construction has progressed to SW Virginia Avenue from SW Taylors Ferry Road in an Environmental Services project to reduce sewer odors and increase the capacity of the Southwest Parallel Interceptor sewer system. The project is designed to accommodate current needs and potential growth. Since February, the contractor has installed about 1,000 feet of 24-inch concrete pipe and 6 manholes along SW Taylors Ferry Road. Next, the contractor will install 800 feet of 48-inch concrete pipe along SW Virginia Avenue, and a permanent odor control facility to the east of Taylors Ferry Road.

Project information, map, and photos are available at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/SWVentilation.

DEVELOPMENTS OF NOTE

  • Crews continue to trench SW Virginia Avenue in order to set up sewer bypass pipe between SW Nevada Street and SW Taylors Ferry Road.
  • The majority of the work on SW Taylors Ferry Road is complete, however, crews will return for night work before the end of the project. Advanced notification will be issued in email updates.

WHAT WE’VE HEARD FROM YOU

  • Several neighbors have complained about noise from backup beepers. Those beepers alert construction workers when a truck begins backing up. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires trucks on construction sites to be equipped with backup beepers as a safety measure.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING CONSTRUCTION

  • Work hours are 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The contractor will work Fridays and Saturdays as needed.
  • Parking in the construction zone on SW Virginia Avenue (between SW Nevada Street and SW Taylors Ferry Road) will be prohibited at all times.
  • Additional equipment and materials will be stored on nearby streets overnight as work transitions to SW Virginia Avenue. Parking will be limited in the area.
  • On SW Virginia Avenue, the Cured-In-Place-Pipe lining machinery will run 24 hours until the liner hardens. You may notice a chemical odor but it will dissipate quickly. See www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/methods for more information and pictures.
  • Access to driveways will be maintained, but expect delays.
  • Public utilities will not be interrupted during construction.
  • There will be periods of inactivity between phases.
  • Ventilation Facility construction has begun on the property to the east of SW Taylors Ferry Road.
  • A city construction inspector will be on-site during work hours, and may be able to assist you with an immediate construction need. Inspectors typically wear a City of Portland safety vest and a hard hat.

TRAFFIC CONTROL

  • SW Virginia Avenue is southbound only beginning approximately 200 feet north of SW Miles Place to SW Taylors Ferry Road. Please plan your trip accordingly.
  • Construction has begun on the Environmental Services Riverview Force Main Project on Highway 43 south of the Sellwood Bridge. To be added to the email update list, which may include traffic updates, email Ashley.Tjaden@portlantoregon.gov or visit www.portlandoregon/bes/RiverviewFM.
  • For information related to the Sellwood Bridge day and nighttime traffic restrictions which impact Highway 43, see the county’s website: www.SellwoodBridge.Org.

Thank you for your cooperation during this important project. Please let us know if you have concerns such as business operations, disability issues, or medical or business deliveries. As always, we’ll strive to provide quick responses to your concerns, minimal disruption near your residence or business, and open and clear communication with you throughout the project.

Ashley Tjaden

Community Outreach

City of Portland Environmental Services

1120 SW 5th Avenue, Room 1000, Portland, OR 97204-3713

Phone: 503-823-5281

Email: ashley.tjaden@portlandoregon.gov

Working for clean rivers

Over one-third of Portland’s 2,500 miles of sewer pipes are more than 80 years old. Projects to replace or repair aging sewers are important for protecting water quality, public health and the environment. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes.

ü To receive email updates for this project, send an email to ashley.tjaden@portlandoregon.gov with “SW Ventilation” in the subject line.

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please email with “unsubscribe” in the subject lin

Come have your say about new rules for taxis, Uber and Lyft on July 30

Community Listening Session Thursday, July 30, 4 to 7 p.m. Auditorium, 2nd Floor, Portland Building, 1120 SW Fifth Avenue

We want to hear from you about how Portland can improve taxi and other for-hire transportation services

Community Listening Session Thursday, July 30, 4 to 7 p.m.
Auditorium, 2nd Floor, Portland Building, 1120 SW Fifth Avenue

The Private for Hire Innovation Task Force is preparing recommendations for new rules for taxis and Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft. The Portland City Council is expected to consider the recommendations in August.

At Thursday’s session, the public is invited to address Task Force members in person, focusing on four key issue areas:

Permitting Program: Should the City cap the number of company or vehicle permits?

Fair fares: Should there be a cap on fares? Should companies be allowed to use higher or “surge” pricing to provide an incentive for drivers to work during busy times?

Accessibility: How can service to people with disabilities be improved? What is your experience requesting a wheelchair accessible vehicle?

Safety standards & working conditions: How can safety for passengers be improved? How can working conditions for drivers be improved?

The public can also provide comments by email: pdxrides@portlandoregon.gov

People with disabilities can also provide comments on access to wheelchair accessible vehicles in an online survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RWB6GNK

For more information, contact 503-865-2486 or email pdxrides@portlandoregon.gov

Learn more about the Innovation Task Force: portlandoregon.gov/transportation/PDXrides

Link to this announcement: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/538931

Dylan Rivera

Media Relations | Portland Bureau of Transportation

t: (503) 823-3723 | c: (503) 577-7534

dylan.rivera@portlandoregon.gov

website | twitter | publicalerts

 

North Fremont and Kerby Sewer Repair Project: Project Design is Underway

Environmental Services is starting design on a small project to repair a segment of severely deteriorated sewer pipe on N Fremont Street at N Kerby Avenue. The newly repaired pipe will better serve the surrounding neighborhood and reduce the risk of backups or leaks. Environmental Services works throughout the city to assess the condition of our underground infrastructure and identify pipes - such as those in this project - that are in need of repair.

North Fremont and Kerby Sewer Repair Project: Project Design is Underway

Environmental Services is starting design on a small project to repair a segment of severely deteriorated sewer pipe on N Fremont Street at N Kerby Avenue. The newly repaired pipe will better serve the surrounding neighborhood and reduce the risk of backups or leaks. Environmental Services works throughout the city to assess the condition of our underground infrastructure and identify pipes - such as those in this project - that are in need of repair.

A project map and up to date information is available at the project website, www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/fremontkerby.

DEVELOPMENTS OF NOTE

Project design is underway, and construction is tentatively expected in summer 2016. Environmental Services will work with the surrounding neighborhood, TriMet, the Bureau of Transportation and other stakeholders throughout the design process to work to reduce construction impacts. We will continue to be in touch as we get closer to construction.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

With questions, comments, or for more information, please contact Becky Tillson at 503-823-2827 or Becky.Tillson@portlandoregon.gov. To be added to an email update list, email Becky with “N Fremont and Kerby” in the subject line. Up to date information can also be found at the project website, www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/fremontkerby.

Thank you for your cooperation during this project. Please let us know if you have concerns such as business operations, disability issues or medical or business deliveries. We will be happy to work with you as project planning moves forward.

Becky Tillson

Community Outreach

City of Portland Environmental Services

1120 SW 5th Ave, Room 1000, Portland, Oregon 97204

Phone: 503-823-2827 l Cell Phone: 503-823-6615

Email: Rebecca.Tillson@portlandoregon.gov

Working for clean rivers

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/bes.

City’s largest energy efficiency project hits major milestones: More than 20,000 street lights converted to LEDs; monthly savings surpass $100,000

Commissioner Steve Novick today announced that the Portland Bureau of Transportation had surpassed two major milestones in the city’s largest ever energy efficiency project: More than 20,000 city street lights have been converted to modern LED lights, and savings from the program have now topped $100,000 per month. Those monthly savings will continue to grow as more lights are converted.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Diane Dulken 503-823-5552

diane.dulken@portlandoregon.gov

Portland Bureau of Transportation @PBOTinfo

NEWS RELEASE:
City’s largest energy efficiency project hits major milestones:

More than 20,000 street lights converted to LEDs; monthly savings surpass $100,000

Commissioner Novick encourages residents, businesses to switch to LEDs and join in the savings

(July 23, 2015) – Commissioner Steve Novick today announced that the Portland Bureau of Transportation had surpassed two major milestones in the city’s largest ever energy efficiency project: More than 20,000 city street lights have been converted to modern LED lights, and savings from the program have now topped $100,000 per month. Those monthly savings will continue to grow as more lights are converted.

The benefits don’t stop there. Commissioner Novick and Transportation Bureau Director Leah Treat also accepted a ceremonial check of $817,490 from Energy Trust of Oregon, which provides incentives and discounted pricing to government, businesses and residents to convert lights to energy-saving LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, a relatively new technology that has quickly taken hold in the energy marketplace. The check represents the incentives for the 20,000 LED streetlights installed to date.

“The city is benefiting in so many ways from energy-saving LEDs. Whether you’re a resident or a business owner, you can too,” said Commissioner Novick at a news conference in North Portland’s Peninsula Park, where crews were changing lights along the surrounding streets. “We are saving money, we are saving energy and we are cutting down on climate disrupting carbon pollution. Plus, each neighborhood will benefit from street lights that last four times longer and provide reliable light for people’s safe travels on our streets and sidewalks.“

The new LED street lights use half the energy of the high-pressure sodium bulbs they replace and are expected to last up to 20 years. They also prevent about 10,500 tons of carbon pollution each year.

“We’re pleased to be working with the City to make a change that has such great benefits – both in cost and energy savings and in the safety and livability of neighborhoods,” said Margie Harris, executive director, Energy Trust. “We’ve seen a dramatic surge in both homes and businesses making the switch to LED lighting. Last year, 68 percent of our record high lighting savings in existing buildings came from LEDs, including indoor fixtures, street lighting, exterior fixtures and lamps.”

The news conference marked the halfway point in the city’s conversion process. PBOT crews began changing 45,000 of the City’s 55,000 street lights to LEDs a year ago, a process that is expected to be complete by the end of 2016. As of this week, 22,676 street lights have been switched.

Portland City Council unanimously passed an ordinance in December 2012 to authorize the conversion, dedicating $18.5 million to the project from a general obligation bond. Once the project is complete, the City can expect to save $1.5 million a year in maintenance and energy costs. At that rate, the project will pay for itself in eight years. At the direction of City Council, future years’ savings will be used as a sustainable revenue stream for street light maintenance, purchasing green energy, and to finance the next round of upgrades about 20 years from now.

The $1.5 million annual savings is a conservative estimate and actual savings may be higher, said PBOT Director Leah Treat. “I am pleased that the savings may exceed our projections. I am also pleased by how the new street lights deliver benefits to each neighborhood, to our city as a whole and to our efforts to address climate change. We are making a difference street by street and light by light.”

People can track the progress of the project via an interactive map at http://bit.ly/PDXLED. Green dots show lights that have been installed; red indicates lights that will be converted. The map also allows the public to send in questions and feedback on each street light.

The new LED street lights are easily identifiable: they cast a crisp light similar to moonlight, unlike the yellow-tinged light from high-pressure sodium bulbs. They provide the same coverage to illuminate city streets as the old fixtures while also projecting more light downward to lower light pollution and make it easier for people to star gaze.

Many other cities are making the switch to save both money and energy, including Los Angeles, Boston and Seattle as well as Portland’s nearby neighbors Gresham, Lake Oswego, Hillsboro, Beaverton, Clackamas County and Milwaukie.

The final environmental benefit? The City is recycling the old high pressure sodium fixtures and bulbs.

###

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation.

Energy Trust of Oregon is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping utility customers benefit from saving energy and generating renewable power. Our services, cash incentives and energy solutions have helped participating customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas save $1.9 billion on energy bills. Our work helps keep energy costs as low as possible, creates jobs and builds a sustainable energy future. Learn more at www.energytrust.org; 1.866.368.7878.