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Parks & Recreation

Healthy Parks, Healthy Portland

Phone: 503-823-PLAY (7529)

Fax: 503-823-6007

1120 SW Fifth Ave., Suite 1302, Portland, OR 97204

Portland Parks & Recreation Urban Forestry News and Activities 

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Identifying Heritage Trees in Parkrose and Parkrose Heights

This Saturday!

panorma rocky butte 

Join Urban Forestry instructors Jim Gersbach, Will Koomjian and Dave Hedberg, along with the Parkrose and Parkrose Heights Tree Teams for an exploration of potential Heritage Trees through a short presentation and neighborhood walk.

The Parkrose and Parkrose Heights neighborhoods are steeped in history and trees offer an opportunity to preserve these stories as a connection to the past. This workshop will highlight local history, Urban Forestry's Heritage Tree Program, and the process for nominating Heritage Trees.

Bestowing Heritage status upon a tree of significant horticultural, historical or cultural value imparts the greatest honor and protection that the city can provide for a tree. Learn more about this program and the magnificent trees of East Portland this Saturday. Here are the details:

    When: Saturday, March 19, 2016, 1-3pm (registration, snacks and refreshments at 12:30pm)

    Where: Parkrose United Methodist Church, Miller Hall (11111 NE Knott St, Portland OR)

    Register here or email: Patrick.Key@portlandoregon.gov (971-334-0347)

           

 

Tree Podcasts Part II: Pier Park's Douglas-firs

Today we bring you the second in a series of podcasts highlighting the amazing stories behind some of Portland's historic and Heritage Trees. Produced through a unique partnership between PP&R Urban Forestry and Portland State University, the Portland Heritage Tree Podcasts were created by Caitlin Tholen, Joshua Justice and Ryan Wisnor as part of a Portland State University course on Portland’s Heritage Tree program.

These podcasts explore a few of the many trees within the Heritage Tree program as well as a few trees that are not officially designated. Visit the PSU site to find not only the podcasts, but credits and further reading on the trees. A special thanks to Bruce Rash of KPSU for his assistance in recording these podcasts.

In this episode, you will hear about the Douglas-fir trees of north Portland's Pier Park and their role in "Bloody Wednesday". On the morning of July 11th, 1934, the Douglas-fir trees acted as shields, witnesses, and later symbols to one of the most dramatic and violent scenes of Portland’s labor history. This podcast is an abridged version of a research paper written by Ryan Wisnor.

For more details on Bloody Sunday, visit Ryan's post at the Pacific Northwest Labor History Association here

For more podcasts and information on the project, visit: https://www.pdx.edu/history/heritage-trees-podcasts

Call for 2016 Naito Community Trees Award nominations

2016 Naito Community Trees Award nominations due this Friday, February 26th!

Do you know an individual or group whose volunteer work has made significant enhancements to Portland's urban forest and inspired others to recognize the many benefits and beauty of trees? If so, consider nominating them for the 2016 Bill Naito Community Trees Award.

2015 Naito Award recipient, John Iott (photo)

2015 Naito Community Trees Award recipient, John Iott, recognized for his hundreds of hours of volunteer service with the Portland Fruit Tree Project and Green Thumb Community Orchard. Pictured from left to right, Bob Naito (son of Bill Naito), John Iott, Mike Abbaté (Parks Director), and Jenn Cairo (City Forester).

Since 1997, this award has recognized one individual and one group, each year, that exemplify the spirit of Bill Naito. Bill Naito was a businessman, civic leader and philanthropist who founded the Urban Forestry Commission in 1974 and chaired it until his passing in 1996. Through his humor, persistence and imaginative approach to projects, he inspired others to recognize the importance of urban forest stewardship.  

Nominations are easy! Simply complete this nomination form and submit a one page story about the nominee's work. To strengthen your nomination, you may include additional materials such as: newspaper articles, photographs, or letters of support. Remember, nominations are due on February 26th, so don't wait any longer!

To learn more about the award and to view a list of previous award recipients, click here. 

Once your nomination is complete, please send or email nominations to: 

Bill Naito Award Committee, c/o Urban Forestry, 10910 N Denver Ave, Portland OR 97217 

or

trees@portlandoregon.gov

Bill Naito photo

William Sumio Naito (1925-1996), champion of the urban forest.

Upcoming workshop: Tree History in Laurelhurst (2/27/16)

Tree History in Laurelhurst is a unique presentation that will provide a new perspective on the value of trees in our urban forest, lessons from the past and ideas for the future.

Laurelhurst park history photo

Photo: Laurelhurst Park Cleanup, November 6, 1935, A2000-025.1121, City of Portland Archives

Join Urban Forestry's resident environmental historian, Dave Hedberg, as he traces the history of the Laurelhurst Neighborhood through trees. Gathering information, documents and photographs from the City of Portland Archives, along with anecdotal interviews with residents, Dave has meticulously stitched together a compelling story of the past through the trees of Laurelhurst. 

Spanning East Burnside Street between NE 32nd and 44th Avenues, Laurelhurst is one of Portland's older neighborhoods with homes built in the early 1900s. The neighborhood was first planned and developed by the Olmstead Brothers architectural firm, with wide streets for cars and not for horse and buggy, which was more typical at the time. As a result, streets did not have to be widened in later years, so the original nine foot planting strips and first trees remained intact. More than 2,200 trees were planted for the first 2,880 lots. Many of these trees still exist, contributing a mature tree legacy to current residents. Learn about these trees and more:

When:  Saturday, February 27th 2016, 1-3pm

Where: Hollywood Library (4040 NE Tillamook St, Portland OR 97212)  

Register here or for more information, contact: Matthew.Downs@portlandoregon.gov 

Laurelhurst History photo

 Photo: East Burnside St, east to 32nd Ave, 1937, A2005-001-1023, Portland City Archives

Tree Podcasts Part I: The Joseph Lane Bigleaf Maple

Today we bring you the first in a series of podcasts highlighting the amazing stories behind some of Portland's Heritage Trees. Produced through  a unique partnership between PP&R Urban Forestry and Portland State University, the Portland Heritage Tree Podcasts were created by Caitlin Tholen, Joshua Justice and Ryan Wisnor as part of a Portland State University course on Portland’s Heritage Tree program. These podcasts explore a few of the many trees within the Heritage Tree program as well as a few trees that are not officially designated. Visit the PSU site to find not only the podcasts, but credits and further reading on the trees.  A special thanks to Bruce Rash of KPSU for his assistance in recording these podcasts.

In this episode we look at Heritage Tree #295, the Joseph Lane Bigleaf Maple. Planted in the late 1800s in honor of the first territorial governor of Oregon, Joseph Lane, then rededicated in 1948 by Mary Albro (founder of the Pioneer Rose Association and whose husband was a descendant of Lane). This podcast also delves into the practice of planting trees in cemeteries and Lone Fir in particular. This podcast is based on original research by Joshua Justice.

For more podcasts and information on the project, visit: https://www.pdx.edu/history/heritage-trees-podcasts