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Parks & Recreation

Healthy Parks, Healthy Portland

Phone: 503-823-PLAY (7529)

Fax: 503-823-6007

1120 SW Fifth Ave., Suite 1302, Portland, OR 97204

Portland Parks & Recreation Urban Forestry News and Activities 

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Now Hiring Urban Forestry Seasonal Staff

Urban Forestry Seasonal Positions – Now Hiring
Applications accepted until March 9, 2016

Portland Parks & Recreation Urban Forestry is seeking seasonal staff to work with its science and policy group conducting tree inventory and monitoring activities.

Tree Inventory Coordinator (multiple positions, job class is Community Service Aide II)

  • Conduct street tree inventory workshops with volunteers in Portland neighborhoods. This includes public speaking, training volunteers, organizing logistics, and checking data for accuracy.
  • Collect street tree inventory data, including tree identification, measurement, and assessment and site evaluation using paper forms and mobile ArcGIS.
  • Analyze data and write reports on inventory findings.
  • Visit http://portlandoregon.gov/parks/treeinventory for project details.
  • Additional duties may include conducting tree planting inspections and data entry.
  • Work schedule is Tuesday through Saturday from 7 am to 3:30 pm.
  • Position start date is April 26 and duration is approximately 6 months.
  • Pay rate is $16/hour.

Elm Monitor (one position, job class is Community Service Aide II)

  • Monitor Portland’s 2,000+ elm population for symptoms of Dutch elm disease. Requires travel throughout the city, visual inspection for symptoms, and recording inspection results.
  • Maintain inspection records, collect samples and send for lab analysis, and work with City inspectors and property owners during the removal of infected trees.
  • Collect tree data, including identification, measurement, and assessment using mobile ArcGIS.
  • Visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/424029  for project details.
  • Work schedule is Monday through Friday from 7 am to 3:30 pm.
  • Position start date is June 2 and duration is approximately 4 months.
  • Pay rate is $16/hour.

Desired qualifications:

  • Tree identification skills, especially non-native trees
  • Experience collecting and maintaining data, especially with mobile devices
  • Experience with ArcGIS and Excel
  • Ability to work independently
  • Organization skills and attention to detail
  • Writing and communication skills, including report writing and public speaking
  • Experience working with volunteers
  • University coursework in forestry, GIS, botany, or related subjects

Required for All Positions: Valid driver's license and acceptable driving record, must pass a criminal background check, and must be at least 18 years of age.

Application procedure: Applications accepted until March 9. Send resume, cover letter, and list of three professional references via email to Julie Fukuda, CS Aide II, treeinventory@portlandoregon.gov 971-337-7437. Please specify which position(s) you are applying for in your cover letter. Candidates selected for interviews will be notified by March 14.

Portland Parks & Recreation values a diverse workforce and seeks ways to promote equity and inclusion within the organization.  PP&R encourages candidates with knowledge, ability and experience working with a broad range of individuals and diverse communities to apply. PP&R encourages candidates that can fluently speak more than one language.

If you are requesting Veteran's Preference, attach a copy of your DD214/DD215 and/or Veteran's Administration letter stating your disability to your profile. You must request Veteran's Preference AND include a copy of your documentation for each recruitment you apply for. Veteran's Preference documentation must be submitted with your application.

inventory training with volunteers

training volunteers in tree identification

Researching Historic Trees in Your Neighborhood

Saturday January 30th, 2016
Portland State University, Cramer Hall 494, 1721 SW Broadway

Choose from two sessions: 
10 am – 12pm or 1pm – 3pm

Register online
Register early: space is limited and registration will close once the sessions fill!

Join environmental historian Dave Hedberg in exploring local archives, sources, and methods to research the history of your neighborhood forest. Researching the historic context of neighborhood forests not only gives trees intangible values, but can also provide valuable lessons to our past and future.

This workshop will provide you with the tools and methods to do your own historical research! Learn how to use the various archives. Bring your internet-connected device (wifi available) and locations to research.

 

Three Opportunities To Bring Free Trees To Your Neighborhood

Free Tree Opportunities in Portland

SUBMITTED BY LEA WILSON, CITY OF PORTLAND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES TREE PROGRAM

As the readers of this blog may already know, trees provide a wealth of benefits to our beautiful, rainy city. Not least of these is the critical role trees play in reducing, redirecting, and preventing runoff from storm events. It is for this valuable service that the City of Portland Environmental Services has partnered with Friends of Trees to provide free and low-cost trees in neighborhoods across Portland.

FREE TREES FOR PARKROSE, PARKROSE HEIGHTS, ARGAY, RUSSELL, WILKES

Friends of Trees free tree planting area    

Any property located where Friends of Trees does plantings can get a great deal on a street tree this winter, but residents of Parkrose, Parkrose Heights, Argay, Russell, and Wilkes neighborhoods can get their street tree for free! Why? Even though outer northeast has a lower population density on average than inner east and north Portland neighborhoods, its canopy cover is still below the city-wide goal! Lots of impervious surfaces like roads, parking lots, and industrial buildings cause urban temperatures to increase and create a tremendous amount of stormwater runoff. Excess runoff can lead to ponding and flooding. While some stormwater goes to the sump system and back to groundwater, some drains directly into the Columbia Slough and Columbia River. No matter where it’s going, runoff takes all the pollution from the street with it. Don’t miss this great opportunity to receive a Friends of Trees tree! Sign up deadline is January 25, 2016. Renter? No problem - get the owner’s permission before signing up.  

FREE EVERGREEN CONIFERS

Contractors planting Ponderosa Pines     Ponderosa Pine on N Dekum

Since they maintain their foliage during the wettest parts of the year, evergreen trees, including conifers, are especially valuable as stormwater managers. And, if you’ve done the street tree inventory, you’ll know that even though the Pacific Northwest is known for iconic trees like Douglas-fir, western red cedar, and ponderosa pine, there aren’t a lot of them lining the streets of Portland. Part of the reason for this is that those big, beautiful trees don’t fit in a three-foot planting strip. So, for those lucky households with planting strips six feet wide or wider and no overhead lines (including properties with no curb or sidewalk), Environmental Services and Friends of Trees are offering free evergreen conifers. Manage stormwater, improve air quality, increase habitat, and add a little green to that grey winter view! Free evergreen conifers for large planting strips are available in every neighborhood where Friends of Trees plants. Check the Friends of Trees calendar or call 503-282-8846 to find out what the deadline is in your neighborhood.

VOLUNTEER AT A FRIENDS OF TREES PLANTING EVENT

Can’t plant any more trees where you live? Tree lovers are always welcome to join in a Friends of Trees planting event. Your participation is important because many people aren’t able to plant their own trees. Truck drivers especially are always needed! No registration required; visit the website to learn more.

Friends of Trees volunteer planting

2015 Tree Inventory Results Revealed

2015 Tree Inventory Results

SUBMITTED BY CARRIE BLACK, CS AIDE II

In summer 2015, PP&R Urban Forestry organized neighborhood stakeholders to conduct volunteer-led street tree inventories in Buckman, Centennial, Hazelwood, Irvington, King, Mill Park, Montavilla, Mt. Scott-Arleta, Mt. Tabor, North Tabor, Old Town-Chinatown, Parkrose, Parkrose Heights, Powellhurst Gilbert, Roseway, Sabin, Sumner, Vernon and Woodlawn neighborhoods. This year’s inventory covered nearly twice as many neighborhoods as 2014, and expanded farther east than ever before. More than 340 volunteers donated 3,500 hours to the project by identifying, measuring, and mapping over 52,000 trees. In addition to collecting data in the field, volunteers entered inventory data into ArcGIS at the Urban Forestry office.

INVENTORY RESULTS

Inventory results, recommendations, and maps were compiled into individual neighborhood reports. Reports are available at http://www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/article/433143. An interactive map is also available for searching the 157,000 trees in the database by address. Inventory highlights are listed below.

Composition: 152 different tree types were found, ranging from 28 in Old Town-Chinatown to 108 in Montavilla. Tree counts range from 990 – 6,200 trees per neighborhood. The most common trees across all neighborhoods are Norway maple, red maple, cherry, and plum. Deciduous broadleaf trees dominate the tree population, but evergreens are more common in neighborhoods farther to the east – evergreen conifers make up more than 10% of all trees in Sumner, Parkrose, Parkrose Heights, Hazelwood, Mill Park, Powellhurst-Gilbert, and Centennial.

Species diversity: Nearly all neighborhoods exceed the recommended guidelines for species diversity for at least their top genus and family. In Parkrose Heights, the most common family (Sapindaceae) has met but not exceeded the diversity threshold of 20%. Across all neighborhoods, maples are widely overrepresented at the species, genus, and family level. Cherry and plum are also overrepresented at the species and genus level, as is the rose family (Rosaceae) overall.

Size class distribution: Across this year’s neighborhoods, just under 50% of the population is comprised of trees under 6” DBH. However, over 60% of the population in Mt. Scott-Arleta and Centennial fall into this size class, while only about 21% of trees in Old Town-Chinatown are less than 6” DBH. Larger diameter size classes (>18” DBH) are less represented in a majority of neighborhoods, but this class comprises a greater portion of the population in Irvington (34%), Buckman (20%), Sumner (19%) and Parkrose (19%). The largest tree in Parkrose Heights, a 79” DBH European beech, is also the largest diameter street tree inventoried in Portland, to date. 

Tree condition: 87-95% of trees are rated in good or fair condition in all neighborhoods, 4-11% rate poor, and 1-2% are dead.

Planting site type: While improved rights-of-way comprise the vast majority (77% or more) of planting site types in most neighborhoods, unimproved rights of-way are more common in neighborhoods to the east. Over 30% of all sites in Hazelwood, Powellhurst Gilbert, and Centennial are unimproved, and over 50% of sites in Parkrose, Mill Park, Parkrose Heights, and Sumner are unimproved.

Planting site size: Large disparities were found among neighborhoods. Small sites, which support small form trees, range from a low of 4% of sites in Roseway up to 73% of sites in King. Planting site size corresponds to the mature size of a tree that can be supported in the site.

Stocking levels: In residential neighborhoods, stocking levels range from 79% in Irvington to 35% in Parkrose Heights. Neighborhoods with more unimproved sites have lower stocking levels than those with more improved sites. Over 66% of all sites in Sumner are unimproved, while stocking level is only 36%. Mt. Scott Arleta and Mt. Tabor represent the median stocking level, with 54% of their planting sites stocked. Over 40,000 spaces have been identified for tree planting across all neighborhoods.

Undersized trees: More than half of large planting sites in all neighborhoods are stocked with undersized trees. This ranges from 90% of all large sites in Old Town-Chinatown to 56% in Powellhurst-Gilbert.

Annual benefits: Total annual environmental and aesthetic benefits provided by street trees range from $57,000 to $1,343,000 per neighborhood, annually.

Replacement values: Replacement values of the street tree population range from $2.3 - $35.9 million.

TREE PLANS

On November 7th, 2015, over 70 participants convened at the Tree Inventory Summit to discuss results and begin creating tree plans. After presentations on the data and hearing from guest speakers on species diversity, tree maintenance, canopy, and tree history, participants broke into neighborhood groups to draft tree plans. The tree plans include a vision statement, goals, action items, and recommendations for property owners. Urban Forestry AmeriCorps members Matthew Downs and Patrick Key are serving as the Tree Plan Coordinators. They will work with each neighborhood tree team to plan two stewardship events between now and June 2016 to help groups stay organized and help meet tree plan goals. At the summit, Matthew and Patrick presented a menu of stewardship workshop options for participants to choose from, including planting, pruning, and maintenance events. 

CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTION

Urban Forestry staff will continue to work with tree teams to provide tree plan guidance and ongoing support. Next year’s inventory will be the last, as Urban Forestry staff and volunteers work to complete the remaining neighborhoods on the east side of the City. Applications for 2016 inventories are available on the project website and are due January 15. For more information about the Tree Inventory Project and to download presentations and data, visit: www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/treeinventory.


Volunteers gather for a Roseway inventory work day.

Top: An inventory volunteer measures the DBH of a street tree in the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood (left); Neighborhood Tree Teams work on their Tree Plans at the summit at Mt Scott Community Center in November (right).

Tree History in Roseway on 1/9/16

Join us Saturday, January 9

Learn more about the history of trees in our neighborhood on Saturday January 9th, 2016

Grace Lutheran Church, 7610 NE Fremont St, Portland, OR, 97213

Join Portland historian Dave Hedberg and the Roseway Tree Team to learn about the trees in your community and how history shaped our urban forest. Understanding and valuing trees historically leaves us better equipped to make future decisions and avoid unexpected consequences inherited from our past.

12:30pm–1:00pm: Registration and sign-in
1:00pm–2:00pm: Presentation by Dave Hedberg, Environmental Historian and Urban Forestry workshop instructor
2:00pm–3:00pm: Coffee and discussion of Roseway tree history with newcomers and longtime residents

REGISTRATION: http://tinyurl.com/treehistoryroseway 

QUESTIONS?
Contact Patrick Key at Portland Parks & Recreation Urban Forestry Patrick.Key@portlandoregon.gov