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Police Bureau

Sworn to protect. Dedicated to serve.

Phone: 503-823-0000

Fax: 503-823-0342

Non-Emergency: 503-823-3333

1111 S.W. 2nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97204

0300.00, Statement of Ethical Conduct

Directive 300.00, Statement of Ethical Conduct

Refer:

  • City Code Chapter 1.03, Code of Ethics
  • HRAR 4.10, Travel
  • HRAR 11.01, Statement of Ethical Conduct
  • HRAR 11.02, Prohibited Conduct
  • HRAR 11.03, Duty to Report Unlawful or Improper Actions
  • Directive 210.85, Academic Achievement
  • Directive 312.50, Identification
  • Directive 313.10, Gratuities, Gifts, and Rewards
  • Directive 313.20, Political Activity
  • Directive 317.40, Authorized Use of Bureau Resources
  • Directive 631.35, Press/Media Relations

Definitions:

  • Ethics: Positive principles of conduct enforced by federal, state, or local law and training. City Code Chapter 1.03.

 

Policy:

  1. As public employees, Police Bureau members are required to comply with ethics laws and be mindful of even the appearance of impropriety. Because ethics law is detailed and nuanced, conduct that could appear dishonest to a reasonable observer will undermine the public trust even if the conduct is not prohibited. Members demonstrate mindfulness by being aware of ethics law, including state law, Human Resources Administrative Rules, and Bureau Directives. Members ensure compliance by consulting about ethical matters with the City Attorney’s Office, through their chain of command, to ensure proper interpretation of relevant law as applied to their particular circumstance. 

2. Members are not permitted to use their official position to seek or receive a personal financial gain or avoid financial loss, nor to obtain a privilege or avoid a consequence, that would not otherwise be available but for their position as a public employee, sworn and non-sworn alike. Restrictions on receipt of benefits or avoidance of financial loss extend to people within the member’s household or any legal entity in which the member of a person in the member’s household is financially interested (e.g. business, not-for-profit organization, etc.). The following examples are non-exhaustive - because ethics law is detailed and nuanced, members ensure compliance with ethics law by consulting about ethical matters with the City Attorney’s Office, through their chain of command, to ensure proper interpretation of relevant law as applied to their particular circumstance.

2.1.   Examples of personal financial gain include, but are not limited to:

2.1.1.      Authorizing purchases with public funds or recommending or awarding business to an entity with which a member or a member of their household is financially interested.

2.1.2.      Failing to follow established City procedures for services (e.g. towing, procurement, contracts, etc.).

2.1.3.      Using travel incentives earned because of travel on behalf of the City for personal travel (e.g. frequent flyer miles, compensation for being ‘bumped’ off overbooked flight, etc.)

2.1.4.      Other examples relate to Directive 312.50, Identification (e.g. using Police Bureau identification to obtain a personal, financial benefit).

2.1.5.      Other examples relate to Directive 313.20, Political Activity (e.g. influencing political activity for personal, financial benefit).

2.1.6.      Other examples relate to Directive 631.35, Press/Media Relations (e.g. endorsing one media outlet over another). 

2.2.   Examples of avoiding personal financial loss include, but are not limited to:

2.2.1.      Directive 313.10, Gratuities, Gifts, and Rewards (e.g. accepting a discount to avoid paying full cost for an item or service).

2.3.   Examples of privileges include, but are not limited to:

2.3.1.      Directive 210.85, Academic Achievement (e.g. use of information received because of City employment, which is confidential or not readily available to the public for academic purposes).

2.3.2.      Directive 317.40, Authorized Use of Bureau Resources (e.g. use of information received because of City employment, which is confidential or not readily available to the public for personal benefit).

2.4.   Examples of consequences include, but are not limited to:

2.4.1.      Attempting to avoid a fine, citation, or arrest (e.g. parking or moving violation, DUII).

3. Members are expected to report conduct they believe to be unethical to their chain of command, the Bureau of Human Resources, and/or the City Attorney's Office.

4. Command Staff Responsibilities:

4.1.   Generate awareness of ethics law among direct reports.

4.2.   Respond to a member’s report of unethical behavior by working with the member to consult with the City Attorney’s Office and/or the Bureau of Human Resources.

4.3.   Consult with the City Attorney’s Office and the Bureau of Human Resources about ethics law with regard to Bureau purposes (e.g. organizing special events, recommending retailers or authorizing discounts on equipment purchases, coordinating compassion dinners for injured members, etc.).

History:

  • Originating Directive Effective: 11/13/15
    • Rescinded Directive 313.00, Misuse of Official Position or Identification
    • Rescinded Directive 313.50, Endorsements, Referrals and Publicity
  • Next Review Date: 11/13/17
  • Review By: Chief’s Office