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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

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1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Dylan Rivera
503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Advisory: Back-to-School Crosswalk Safety Demonstration at Cesar Chavez K-8 with PBOT, ODOT, Metro, Portland Police and Sasquatch

(Aug. 30, 2016) Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer and Sasquatch from the “Oregonian Crossing” safety campaign will cross the street with students heading to school at Cesar Chavez K-8. The Portland Police Bureau will provide additional enforcement as families arrive for school.

Who:  Transportation Director Leah Treat, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer and Sasquatch.

What:  Crosswalk safety engagement with children and parents.

When:  7:30 to 8:15 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016

Where:  Marked crosswalk at N Willis Blvd & N Courtenay Ave in front of Caesar Chavez School.(Aug. 30, 2016) 

VIDEO Oregonian Crossing:

You never know who you might see in a crosswalk

Sasquatch video

Every intersection is a crosswalk, whether it is marked or not, so everyone driving needs to stop for people attempting to cross. Near schools, people driving need to be especially mindful and watch out for parents and children walking and biking.


As students head back to school, it’s particularly important to obey traffic laws and drive safely in school zones. Drivers should also be aware that Portland Police Bureau officers will be at every school during the first few weeks of the school year to enforce school speed zones and other traffic laws.


ODOT and Metro’s “Every intersection is a crosswalk” campaign can be seen on TriMet buses, in bus shelters, as well as on postcards, posters, yard signs and social media. A recently released safety video featuring Sasquatch reinforces the message that people (and other mythical creatures) have the right of way when they show intent to cross the street.


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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

 

News Release: Commissioner Novick and PBOT share grief over serious injury of student struck near George Middle School

(Aug. 30, 2016) - Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick and the Portland Bureau of Transportation issued the following statement after a report that a 15-year-old boy was struck by a car on North Columbia Boulevard and North Midway Avenue near George Middle School.

“We were saddened to hear about this crash, occurring in the first week of the school year for Portland Public Schools, and as other public and private schools prepare to start classes,” Novick said. “This comes less than two weeks after a fatality on SE Hawthorne that took a young life and shocked and saddened all of us.”

As it does with all severe crashes, PBOT will work with the Portland Police Bureau to understand the factors that contributed to this incident. As PBOT has learned through its Vision Zero efforts, most fatal and serious injury crashes in Portland are caused by people disobeying traffic laws, including by speeding, distracted driving or by driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

Until we learn more, this crash should serve as a reminder to everyone that every intersection in Oregon is a crosswalk, so people driving are required to stop and stay stopped for pedestrians attempting to cross. People driving need to pay attention to school zones and obey the 20 mph speed limit in those zones. Watch for school buses. Remember, if yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop. Speeding makes crashes with pedestrians more likely to result in fatalities or severe injuries. When a pedestrian is struck by a car traveling at 40 mph, there’s an 80 percent chance of fatality or severe injury, while that percentage drops to 10 percent when the vehicle is traveling at 20 mph. Whether you are driving, walking, biking or using a mobility device, be aware of your surroundings and be vigilant and courteous to other people traveling on our streets.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

For more information on PBOT’s Safe Routes to School program visit http://www.saferoutesportland.org

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard from E Burnside to SE Washington Street, August 31 – September 21

(August 29, 2016)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures on SE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard from E Burnside to SE Washington Street, on Wednesday, August 31, through Wednesday, September 21, 7 a.m. through 4 p.m. each work day.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave 1.18 lane miles of pavement.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Traffic Advisory: (VIDEOS) PBOT, Police urge the public to travel safely as students go back to school in coming weeks

(Aug. 26, 2016) -- The Portland Police Bureau, Metro and the Portland Bureau of Transportation are partnering to keep Portland's students safe as they return to school in the coming weeks. Classes at the five school districts in Portland begin in the next two weeks, with the largest, Portland Public Schools starting on Monday, Aug. 29. Several short videos also explain the importance of stopping for pedestrians and the 20 mph speed limit in school zones.

Vision Zero Portland logo

To ensure student safety and increase awareness of the start of the school year, the Portland Police Bureau will be conducting high visibility patrols around all Portland schools as part of a "Back to School" safety campaign. Warnings and citations will be issued, focusing on traffic violations near schools.

Commissioner Steve Novick, who oversees PBOT, said the start of the school year is a good reminder that the speed limit in school zones is 20 mph.

"Everyone needs to remember to look out for children walking and biking to school," Novick said. "If we all look out for each other when we're walking, driving or biking we can help our kids have a safe, fun journey to school."

Transportation Director Leah Treat will greet students and parents at Cesar Chavez Elementary on Wednesday morning to encourage biking and walking and safe travel in school zones.

“As the transportation director and as a mom, safety around schools is a something I think about every day," Treat said. “Every intersection is a crosswalk, whether it is marked or not, so everyone driving needs to stop for people attempting to cross. Near schools, we need to be especially mindful and watch out for parents and children walking and biking.Portland Safe Routes to School is a great resource for parents who want to learn more and spread the word.”

(VIDEO) Oregonian Crossing: You never know who you might see at a crosswalk

Sasquatch

VIDEO by Metro and Oregon Department of Transportation. 

From 7:30 to 8:15 a.m. on Wednesday at Cesar Chavez School in North Portland, Treat will be joined by Sasquatch, the mysterious character from Northwest forests who has been helping Metro and the Oregon Department of Transportation with their Oregonian Crossingpedestrian safety campaign (www.walkbikeroll.org). Treat and Sasquatch will speak with children and parents, and distribute pedestrian safety information. Portland Safe Routes to School will also help spread the word about what parents can do to travel safely in the area.

(VIDEO) '20 is Plenty' in School Zones

20 is plenty video

VIDEO by Portland Police Bureau.

(VIDEO) "It's kind of, like, majestic:" Kids share why they walk and bike to school

It's like majestic
VIDEO by Metro.

The goals of this partnership are to provide a positive and safe environment for our children to learn and travel to and from school and to provide a safe environment in and around the schools for students, parents, school staff and their neighbors for the start of the 2013-2014 school year.

Beginning this week, many young people will be walking and riding their bicycles to school. Congestion in school zones will increase, especially during the busy morning and afternoon drop-off and pickup times.  

As students head back to school, it’s particularly important to obey traffic laws and drive safely in school zones. Drivers should also be aware that Portland Police Bureau officers will be at every school during the first few weeks of the school year to enforce school speed zones and other traffic laws.

If you drive to school, through a school zone or in neighborhoods near a school, follow these safety tips to keep all students safe this year:

  • Obey the 20 mph speed limit in all school zones.
  • Be patient during drop-off and pick-up if you drive your student to school or drive near a school. The roadways surrounding schools are congested during these times.
  • Do not idle your vehicle in school zones.
  • Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians at all intersections, whether marked as a crosswalk or not: It’s the law.
  • When turning right on a red light, look both ways for people walking and biking.
  • Be aware of students where there are no sidewalks along the road and when backing out of driveways.
  • Watch for younger and less predictable children who may dart into the road.
  • Stop and wait for school buses when red lights are flashing.
  • If your a parent, consider parking a few blocks from your child's school and walking the rest of the way. You'll reduce traffic congestion by the school and get a pleasant morning walk with your child.

Thanks for doing your part to provide safe student travel near all Portland schools.

For more information on the Safe Routes to School program visit http://www.saferoutesportland.org Portland Safe Routes to School is a partnership of the City of Portland, schools, neighborhoods, community organizations and agencies that advocates for and implements programs that make walking and biking around our neighborhoods and schools fun, easy, safe and healthy for all students and families while reducing our reliance on cars. The Safe Routes program can provide safety educational materials and other resources for parents and school officials.

The City of Portland has joined cities around the country in embracing Vision Zero – the notion that the death of even one person on our roads is one too many. Vision Zero prevents traffic deaths through smart policy and system design. Learn more about Vision Zero and Speed Safety Cameras by visiting www.visionzeroportland.com.

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News Release: Oregon’s first Speed Safety Cameras now operational on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway

(Aug. 25, 2016) -- The first Speed Safety Cameras in Oregon are now operational on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, and will begin issuing warnings today to drivers who exceed the road’s posted 40 mph speed limit.

Vision Zero Portland logoThe goal of the Speed Safety Cameras is to reduce speeding and save lives. The SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway corridor is part of Portland’s High Crash Network of roads. PBOT’s recent Vision Zero crash data analysis found that Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway is one of the top roads where people driving are killed or seriously injured. People walking along or crossing on foot are twice as likely to be struck by a car than on the average city street.

“No family should lose a loved one to reckless speeding,” said Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick. “The connection between death and high speeds is clear. Unfortunately, too many people continue to disregard the fact that safe speeds save lives. That’s why the implementation of these new Speed Safety Cameras is so important - they are a proven tool for reducing speeding.”

“Speed Safety Cameras are a critical tool for addressing unsafe driving speeds on Portland’s High Crash Corridors,” said Transportation Director Leah Treat, “We have an imperative to address the high rate of fatalities happening along these roads and to keep Portlanders safe - whether they are walking, bicycling or driving.”

Safety Cameras on BH Hwy

Photo by Hannah Schafer, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

The installation on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway is the first safety camera installation since the City of Portland and community safety advocates convinced the state Legislature in 2015 to pass HB 2621, which allows them to be used on High Crash Corridors in the Portland city limits. The City of Portland has been using other cameras to supplement speed enforcement for years, with police officers in vans enforcing speed limit violations. Portland also uses cameras to increase enforcement compliance with red lights at traffic signals.

Safety Cameras are a proven safety tool that can reduce dangerous speeding and save lives. The cameras are mounted along High Crash Corridors and when people driving past them exceed the posted speed limit, they capture photos and video for review by Portland Police. The Speed Safety Cameras will issue warnings for the first 30 days of operation, and issue citations starting Sept. 24. An officer from the Portland Police Bureau will review violations before a citation is issued. The typical fine will be $160. Any money received from the tickets pays for the program and safety improvements on the corridor. Additional cameras will be installed during winter and spring 2017 at SE 122nd Avenue between Foster and Powell Boulevards, Marine Drive and Outer SE Division Street.

In addition to the new cameras, PBOT is delivering three additional safety and maintenance projects on a section of SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway beginning this fall that reflect the goals of the Southwest Community Plan and the Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway High Crash Corridor Safety Plan.

Among the included projects:

  • Paving maintenance: PBOT will perform a two-inch grind and pave maintenance project, resulting in new pavement from SW 21st/Bertha Court to SW 35th Avenue to be delivered this fall 2016.
  • Safety Demonstration Project: PBOT will deliver a Safety Demonstration Project on Beaverton Hillsdale Highway in spring 2017. The project includes a new marked pedestrian crossing with a median island with Rapid Flashing Beacons at 35th Avenue, a protected pedestrian/bike lane space, reduced travel lane widths, and new ADA-compliant pedestrian curb ramps.
  • Stormwater Improvements: PBOT and the Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) are partnering to install stormwater curb extensions on at Shattuck. These will shorten the pedestrian crossings and ADA curb ramps will be constructed at all corners. Construction will be completed in the 2016/2017 fiscal year.

Speed reader board

Photo by Gabe Graff, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

New speed signage and speed reader boards were also installed on SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway warning drivers in advance of the cameras in both directions. Additionally, PBOT staff conducted extensive outreach with local neighborhood associations as well as over 75 businesses and community organizations to raise awareness of the changes along the corridor.

Death rate by various speeds

The City of Portland has joined cities around the country in embracing Vision Zero – the notion that the death of even one person on our roads is one too many. Vision Zero prevents traffic deaths through smart policy and system design. Learn more about Vision Zero and Speed Safety Cameras by visiting www.visionzeroportland.com.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation.