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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera
503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


Traffic Alert: West Burnside has reopened to eastbound and westbound travel after Wednesday night landslide

Workers clearing landslde

PBOT crews cleared more than 200 cubic yards of debris and vegetation from the landslide on West Burnside on Thursday and Friday. In this photo from Friday, they use heavy equipment to clear the area. Photo by Cameron Glasgow, Portland Bureau of Transportation. 

(4:45 p.m. Jan. 20, 2017) The Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that West Burnside Street has been reopened with one lane of travel in each direction. Travelers should use caution and observe traffic control signage in the area, as the location of lanes has shifted slightly. 

PBOT engineers and maintenance crews, foresters from Portland Parks & Recreation worked to clear the site and make it safe, coordinating work with a nearby landowner. Bureau of Development Services inspected the site to make sure private property was safe. 

WATCH VIDEO: 100-foot tall Douglas fir tree being felled from the slide, after the top half was cut off: https://youtu.be/U5JXbjWhGaA 

About 200 feet of West Burnside closest to the slide has been reduced to one lane each direction, down from two lanes westbound and one lane eastbound. Travelers should use caution and be mindful of the orange traffic delineators and signage that mark the area. 
West Burnside is open to traffic
Debris continues to fall from the 50-foot tall landslide that looms over the north side of the roadway. The area of the slide is shallow enough that engineers decided it was safe to reopen part of the roadway to traffic. Jersey barriers are in place to catch any debris that might fall from the slide. At this time, there is no estimate for when the additional westbound travel lane may be reopened. 

PBOT crews cleared more than 200 cubic yards of fallen soil and vegetation from the area, which had been closed since about 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2016. 

Given the size of the slide and its location adjacent to the roadway, and with a house right above the slide, it is important for PBOT engineers to ensure the stability of the hillside in order to protect the safety of the traveling public and city workers. 

Numerous downed trees were cleared before PBOT engineers could get a clear view of the scene and assess what was needed to make the roadway safe for city crews and the public. 

A 100-foot tall Douglas fir tree adjacent to a home was removed by a contractor for the homeowner. Crews from Portland Parks & Recreation urban forestry removed other trees in the slide area. 

(Photos by Portland Bureau of Transportation) 

Workers secure landslide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work to secure the landslide continued on Friday. Photo by Dylan Rivera, Portland Bureau of Transportation.  

 

 

 


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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City's transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Traffic Advisory: West Burnside to remain closed through Friday afternoon, and potentially through next week; use U.S. 26 or NW Cornell Road

(11:45 a.m. Jan. 18, 2017) The Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that West Burnside Street will remain closed through Friday afternoon, and potentially through next week, as crews work to clear a 50-foot tall landslide that looms over the roadway.

West Burnside has been closed to through traffic from NW Skyline to NW 23rd Avenue.

The road is closed to all through traffic. Travelers should consider U.S. 26 or NW Cornell Road as alternative routes for through traffic. Expect delays on area roads during rush hour and consider public transit. Check trimet.org/alerts for information about public transit schedules and delays.

Given the size of the slide and its location adjacent to the roadway, and with a house right above the slide, it is important for PBOT engineers to ensure the stability of the hillside in order to protect the safety of the traveling public and city workers.

Numerous downed trees must be cleared before PBOT engineers have a clear view of the scene and can fully assess what is needed to make the roadway safe for city crews and the public. A 100-foot tall Douglas fir tree adjacent to a home must be removed. Crews from Portland Parks & Recreation urban forestry crews must remove other trees in the slide area.

Debris was still falling from the slide last night and Thursday morning.

An estimated at least 75 cubic yards of material must be removed by PBOT crews, potentially taking six to 12 dump truck loads.

We will provide an update on Friday.

Avoid the area. Use alternate routes. Obey street closed and detour signage. Use caution and travel slowly on detour routes and area streets.

Local access for residents only is permitted westbound to NW Uptown Terrace and eastbound to NW Maywood Drive and NW Hermosa Blvd and nearly streets.


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News Release: BIKETOWN 2016 Report: Survey shows BIKETOWN supports local business, tourism and reduces car trips

BIKETOWN data shows Portlanders and visitors take 160,000 trips in five and a half months

 BIKETOWN logo

(January 18, 2017) In five and a half short months, the bright orange bikes of BIKETOWN have reduced automobile use, increased access to local businesses and expanded tourism opportunities. Those are some of the key findings of a survey of more than 2,400 people who have used Portland’s bike share system since it launched July 19.

The survey, which included one-time users as well as annual members, found 26 percent of Portlanders using BIKETOWN said they used it instead of driving a car and 64 percent said they are biking more.

The survey shows BIKETOWN supports local businesses. Among tourists using BIKETOWN, 71 percent said they rode an orange bike to reach stores or restaurants. Also, 69 percent of local residents using BIKETOWN said they were more likely to patronize a business near the colorful orange stations.

Survey graphic image of data

Since the launch of BIKETOWN on July 19, there have been over 160,000 trips taken on the City’s bike share system totaling 312,690 miles (the equivalent of 49 round-trip rides from Portland, Oregon to Portland, Maine).

In 2016, 38,000 people have used BIKETOWN in Portland and 3,000 of them have committed to annual memberships. The average trip length for all users is 1.57 miles and the average trip time is 24 minutes.

“We are thrilled with how quickly BIKETOWN has been embraced by Portlanders and visitors alike,” Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat said. “This survey shows BIKETOWN makes it easy for people to use bikes instead of cars for short trips, reducing congestion, pollution and carbon emissions. We are incredibly proud that this new transportation option has helped increase biking in Portland while at the same time strengthening the local economy and supporting local business.”

The survey, sent to all BIKETOWN users in November 2016, provided additional insight into the usage and popularity of the service. Among the survey’s findings:

BIKETOWN is delivering on its promise to increase biking and reduce car trips:

  • 26% of BIKETOWN trips eliminated car trips (among locals)
  • 64% of resident/commuters surveyed said they’re biking more
  • 20% of locals reduced their car ownership or have considered it

BIKETOWN strengthens the local economy and supports local businesses

  • 56% of BIKETOWN tourist riders surveyed said that bicycling opportunities were a factor in their decision to visit Portland.
  • 71% of out-of-town BIKETOWN users reported using BIKETOWN to reach shopping or restaurant destinations.
  • 69% of local BIKETOWN users said they were more likely to patronize a business near a BIKETOWN station.

BIKETOWN users rated BIKETOWN’s system performance highly, rating all aspects of performance good or excellent.

Said survey respondent and BIKETOWN user Megan Cwiklinski, “I ride a bicycle all the time now because of the convenience of BIKETOWN. I use them everyday to and from work and just to get around in the Portland area. BIKETOWN is so easy to use and I love not having to worry about locking and storing my own bike!”

“My family moved back to Portland in August of this year after having been out of the country for 6 years. We decided to buy one car when we came back and see if we needed a second,” said BIKETOWN user Erik Swanson. “I was not aware of BIKETOWN bikes before moving back, but was pleased to find stations both a block from my house and a block from my work. I have been using your bikes every day to get to and from work and to work meetings downtown, and I love it! My family does not need to purchase a second car, and biking through the city is such a nice way to start and end my day.”

The most popular BIKETOWN station is SW Salmon at Waterfront Park, with a total of 12,387 trips starting or ending at the location. BIKETOWN continues to be popular even as rain and snow fall in Portland. During a recent snow event on Wednesday, December 14, five people joined BIKETOWN as new members with single ride passes, presumably as an alternate means of travel during winter weather conditions.

Looking forward, PBOT will continue to enhance its partnership with the Community Cycling Center to provide discounted memberships to Portlanders living on low incomes through its BIKETOWN for ALL program. The Community Cycling Center partners with affordable housing, social service and community organizations to connect those in need with BIKETOWN memberships, including cash membership options for those without a credit or debit card. In 2016, BIKETOWN for All members took 776 trips.

In 2017, PBOT hopes to increase both the number of trips and number of people using BIKETOWN. As a new service, BIKETOWN’s usage is expected to grow as more people become familiar with this transportation option. Half of respondents said that bringing BIKETOWN to new areas would help them use the service more. PBOT and its partners will continue to review ridership demographics and to look for opportunities to encourage more Portlanders to use the bikes and bring BIKETOWN to new neighborhoods while staying a financially sustainable public service.

Learn more about BIKETOWN at www.biketownpdx.com

About PBOT

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation


About Nike

Nike believes in the power of sport and physical activity to help strengthen communities. As a longtime partner with the City of Portland, BIKETOWN highlights the company’s commitment to make Portland even more active, vibrant and innovative. As part of this collaboration, Nike designed the innovative visual identity for the program’s standard bike which is the highly identifiable orange that is synonymous with Nike. In addition, Nike oversees the design and branding of the system’s logo, stations and physical presence, as well as a select number of limited edition bike wrap designs, beginning with the Nike Air Max 95, Nike Air Trainer 1 and Nike Air Safari.

About Motivate

Motivate is a global leader in bike share. A full-service bike share operator and technology innovator, Motivate works to re-envision how people experience and move around cities. Motivate operates over 75% of the bike share fleet in North America, including the four largest systems in the US: Citi Bike in New York, Divvy in Chicago, Capital Bikeshare in the D.C. area, Bay Area Bike Share (San Francisco Bay Area) and Hubway in the Boston area. International Motivate bike share systems include Bike Share Toronto and Melbourne Bike Share (Australia). www.motivateco.com

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Winter Weather Travel Advisory: PBOT encourages the public to use caution, clear storm drains, as lingering freezing rain and rains continue overnight

 Get Home Safe Banner

Snow shovel and storm drain

(5 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017) The Portland Bureau of Transportation encourages the traveling public to use caution as lingering freezing rain in East Portland and slushy conditions citywide could make travel challenging tonight and early Wednesday morning.

The National Weather Service has advised that freezing rain is likely to last the longest, with more ice accumulation, in areas East of Interstate 205. Drivers should be aware that freezing rain creates treacherous traveling conditions.

 

The public should be alert to tricky road conditions

  • Water ponding on streets may cause vehicles to hydroplane or splash nearby properties and people walking or biking. Slow down and look out for others.
  • Slick spots of lingering slush, especially in areas at high elevation, may cause slippery conditions for people driving, biking and walking.
  • Be aware that trees may begin to fall, after days of being laden with freezing rain and snow. Fallen trees may block roads or cut power lines. Clear limbs from travel lanes if you can safely. For large trees blocking travel lanes or sidewalks, call PBOT's maintenance dispatchers at 503-823-1700. Stay away from downed power lines, and call 9-1-1 to report them.

 

Do your part to help everyone Get Home Safe!

  • Mayor Ted Wheeler has said this storm presents a "community moment" when Portlanders should try to help make neighbors and fellow Portlanders safe.
  • Clear the storm drain near your home or business! With more than 58,000 storm drains citywide, we need everyone to help keep them clear so melted snow and ice can drain. Clogged storm drains cause water ponds along streets, causing vehicles to hydroplane, and splashing people biking and walking. Learn more about storm drains at PBOT's web site.
  • Everyone is urged to continue to clear sidewalks adjacent their home or business, as required by city code.
  • Be watchful for people walking and biking who are also trying to get around in hazardous, low visibility conditions. Travel safely and responsibly.

PBOT crews continue to work through the night to clear roads

 

  • PBOT crews will clear storm drains of slush and snow, making way for melting snow and ice to seep into the stormwater system and prevent street flooding. But with more than 58,000 citywide, we need the public's help to clear them too!
  • Tonight, PBOT crews will work to clear slush from primary and secondary plow routes.
  • Crews will also work to push frozen, rutted icy material from streets, pushing it away from travel lanes.

Winter Weather Travel Advisory: With freezing rain in the forecast, PBOT urges travelers to exercise extreme caution, avoid travel if possible

Get Home Safe Banner

(5 p.m., Monday, Jan. 16, 2017) The National Weather Service has issued a freezing rain advisory for the Portland metropolitan area. The current forecast calls for freezing rain to start early Tuesday morning and last at least into Tuesday afternoon. Up to 0.4 inches of ice accumulation is likely. Based on this forecast, the Portland Bureau of Transportation warns the traveling public to be prepared for severe winter weather that may create hazardous traveling conditions during the Tuesday morning commute.

The Weather Service has also advised that freezing rain is likely to last the longest, with more ice accumulation, in areas East of Interstate 205.

Drivers should be aware that freezing rain creates treacherous travelling conditions. If possible, travelers should avoid all travel unless absolutely necessary. Travelers should monitor conditions closely throughout the day.

PBOT is closely monitoring conditions and will bring on extra crews starting at 3:30 a.m. Tuesday morning to put down sand and gravel at critical intersections. Travelers should still be prepared for very slippery conditions.

 

Watch for black ice

Black ice is defined as ice that remains on roadways that are not subjected to direct sunlight. Black ice commonly forms on roads that wind around lakes and rivers, in tunnels, on overpasses and in highly shaded, rural areas. Black ice is almost invisible to the naked eye. Be especially careful when driving or riding into shaded areas, on bridges and overpasses, and on infrequently traveled roads. Slow down during your approach.

 

Look out for people walking and biking

Be watchful for pedestrians and bicyclists who are also trying to get around in hazardous, low visibility conditions. Share the Road safely and responsibly.

 

Carry an emergency weather kit

Carry an emergency weather kit in your vehicle to help keep you safe and more comfortable during long waits. Your kit should include chains, battery jumper cables, first aid kit, shovel, basic tools (pliers, wrench, screwdriver and knife), blanket, extra clothing (hats, socks, boots, and mittens), flashlight, bag of sand, and cellular phone or CB Radio.

 

See more safety tips: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/319804

 

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