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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

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1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Dylan Rivera
503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Release: PBOT to start booting vehicles with unpaid parking tickets on Wednesday

(Sept. 6, 2016) The Portland Bureau of Transportation on Wednesday will begin booting vehicles that have orders to tow issued by Multnomah County Circuit Court.

“I asked the Council to allow PBOT to boot, rather than tow, vehicles with outstanding parking citations and fees,” said Commissioner Steve Novick, who oversees PBOT. “I wanted to make this change largely because the towing and vehicle storage fees are an unnecessary penalty that is particularly burdensome for people with low incomes. Booting gives folks the opportunity to pay their citations or appear in front of a judge at Multnomah County Court to resolve their outstanding citations, before they start getting hit with additional towing charges.”

Booting demonstration

PBOT Parking Enforcement staff demonstrate booting a vehicle. Photo by Hannah Schafer, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Frequently Asked Questions about the City of Portland’s new booting policy for parking enforcement

What’s the current process for towing vehicles due to overdue citations and fees?

The Multnomah County Court generates a “tow list” of vehicles with orders to tow issued by the court. The list is sent to PBOT parking enforcement and if they come across a vehicle that is on the list, PBOT contacts the contracted tow company and the vehicle is towed.

What does this change do?

On Aug. 3, 2016, the City Council gave PBOT code authority to “immobilize” vehicles for booting. Instead of towing the vehicle right away, it will be booted for up to 36 hours. This gives people the opportunity to see a judge, make payment, or set up a payment plan before they accrue the additional charges associated with tows.

How does a vehicle get on the tow list?

Vehicles that have unpaid parking citations and fees totaling more than $500 and/or six delinquent citations are put on the tow list by the Multnomah County Court.

How is the Multnomah County Court involved?

As a result of legislation from the 1970s, Multnomah County Circuit Court handles all of the City’s parking and traffic citations.

How much does it normally cost for tow and storage?

The current contractual cost of a tow is $168. The cost to store a towed vehicle past the initial four hours is $25 per day.

Is there an additional booting fee?

A booting fee is not currently proposed.

How long will boots stay on vehicles in the ROW?

Boots will stay on vehicles for 36 hours before being towed. If the customer is making arrangements with the Court and more time is needed, PBOT will accommodate that. It is not the intention of PBOT to store vehicles in the ROW for a significant amount of time, however.

Will vehicles accrue parking citations while it remains on the street?

Not currently proposed.

How do customers pay the Court or see a judge?

Customers can pay the Court through the normal process in person. Payment plans can be scheduled with the Court, if needed. Customers can also see a judge at Drop in Court, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. without an appointment. PBOT will not boot on Fridays, to allow vehicle owners to contact the Court during normal business hours and not have to wait over the weekend to have their vehicle released. 

The court provides these additional details for people who have vehicles immobilized or towed. If your vehicle was immobilized or towed because of an order to tow issued by the court due to unpaid parking citations, to obtain a release for the vehicle, you MUST:

  • Be the registered owner; AND
  • Have a valid government issued photo ID; AND
  • Pay, in full, all outstanding citations with cash, a money order, a cashier’s check or credit/debit card that is in your name. Payment plans may be available, if authorized by a judge.

If you wish to use a credit/debit card that is in another person’s name, the cardholder must appear with you and present a valid government issued photo ID. You cannot pay for a vehicle release over the phone or online. You and the person paying for the release of the vehicle MUST appear in person at the Multnomah County Circuit Court, Parking Citation Office, Room 106, 1021 SW 4th Avenue in Portland.

How will the boot be removed?

After the customer makes arrangements with the Court, PBOT parking enforcement will remove the boot immediately. PBOT projects the estimated wait time would be less than an hour.

How much will the equipment cost PBOT? 

$3,500.

View these FAQs online at: www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/588735

News Release: Crosswalk education and enforcement action nets 4 citations, 5 warnings in one hour during highly visible campaign at Cesar Chavez K-8

(Aug. 31, 2016) - The Portland Bureau of Transportation and Portland Police Bureau announced the results of a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action that took place today from 7:00 to 8:00 a.m. at the marked crossing at N Willis Boulevard at N Courtenay Avenue to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws. 

As part of the action, Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer and Sasquatch from the “Oregonian Crossing” safety campaign crossed the street with students heading to school at Cesar Chavez K-8 this morning.

Education and enforcement actions such as today's event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to reach its Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries in Portland's streets.

Under Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk whether it is marked or unmarked.  People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane.

Warnings (5):
3 Seatbelt
2 Speeding

Citations (4):
1 Driving While Suspended
1 Driving Uninsured
2 Cell phone 

Oregonian Crossing

Sasquatch demonstrates crosswalk safety at Cesar Chavez K-8. Photo by Dylan Rivera, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

The crossing is heavily used by school children and transit riders - as it is directly in front of Cesar Chavez K-8 School and near two TriMet bus stops.

Each crosswalk enforcement action involves a designated pedestrian crossing at a marked or unmarked crosswalk while police monitor how people driving, bicycling and walking adhere to traffic safety laws. Drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk and pedestrians who fail to follow Oregon traffic laws may be issued a warning or citation. A PBOT staff person served as the designated pedestrian crossing the street during today’s action.

Near schools, people driving need to be especially mindful and watch out for parents and children walking and biking. As students head back to school, it’s particularly important to obey traffic laws and drive safely in school zones. Drivers should also be aware that Portland Police Bureau officers will be at every school during the first few weeks of the school year to enforce school speed zones and other traffic laws.

Crosswalk education and enforcement actions are an effective way to communicate traffic laws to people driving and walking. The transportation and police bureaus do education and enforcement actions throughout the year in response to requests by community members, city traffic safety engineers, and Portland Police to educate the general public on the rules at marked and unmarked crossings.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for walking safely across a street. View the results of previous actions. Find out more about PBOT’s safety work and Vision Zero, PBOT’s goal of making our transportation system the safest possible and moving towards zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries by 2025. www.visionzeroportland.com.

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News Advisory: Back-to-School Crosswalk Safety Demonstration at Cesar Chavez K-8 with PBOT, ODOT, Metro, Portland Police and Sasquatch

(Aug. 30, 2016) Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer and Sasquatch from the “Oregonian Crossing” safety campaign will cross the street with students heading to school at Cesar Chavez K-8. The Portland Police Bureau will provide additional enforcement as families arrive for school.

Who:  Transportation Director Leah Treat, Oregon Department of Transportation Region 1 Manager Rian Windsheimer and Sasquatch.

What:  Crosswalk safety engagement with children and parents.

When:  7:30 to 8:15 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016

Where:  Marked crosswalk at N Willis Blvd & N Courtenay Ave in front of Caesar Chavez School.(Aug. 30, 2016) 

VIDEO Oregonian Crossing:

You never know who you might see in a crosswalk

Sasquatch video

Every intersection is a crosswalk, whether it is marked or not, so everyone driving needs to stop for people attempting to cross. Near schools, people driving need to be especially mindful and watch out for parents and children walking and biking.


As students head back to school, it’s particularly important to obey traffic laws and drive safely in school zones. Drivers should also be aware that Portland Police Bureau officers will be at every school during the first few weeks of the school year to enforce school speed zones and other traffic laws.


ODOT and Metro’s “Every intersection is a crosswalk” campaign can be seen on TriMet buses, in bus shelters, as well as on postcards, posters, yard signs and social media. A recently released safety video featuring Sasquatch reinforces the message that people (and other mythical creatures) have the right of way when they show intent to cross the street.


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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

 

News Release: Commissioner Novick and PBOT share grief over serious injury of student struck near George Middle School

(Aug. 30, 2016) - Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick and the Portland Bureau of Transportation issued the following statement after a report that a 15-year-old boy was struck by a car on North Columbia Boulevard and North Midway Avenue near George Middle School.

“We were saddened to hear about this crash, occurring in the first week of the school year for Portland Public Schools, and as other public and private schools prepare to start classes,” Novick said. “This comes less than two weeks after a fatality on SE Hawthorne that took a young life and shocked and saddened all of us.”

As it does with all severe crashes, PBOT will work with the Portland Police Bureau to understand the factors that contributed to this incident. As PBOT has learned through its Vision Zero efforts, most fatal and serious injury crashes in Portland are caused by people disobeying traffic laws, including by speeding, distracted driving or by driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

Until we learn more, this crash should serve as a reminder to everyone that every intersection in Oregon is a crosswalk, so people driving are required to stop and stay stopped for pedestrians attempting to cross. People driving need to pay attention to school zones and obey the 20 mph speed limit in those zones. Watch for school buses. Remember, if yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop. Speeding makes crashes with pedestrians more likely to result in fatalities or severe injuries. When a pedestrian is struck by a car traveling at 40 mph, there’s an 80 percent chance of fatality or severe injury, while that percentage drops to 10 percent when the vehicle is traveling at 20 mph. Whether you are driving, walking, biking or using a mobility device, be aware of your surroundings and be vigilant and courteous to other people traveling on our streets.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

For more information on PBOT’s Safe Routes to School program visit http://www.saferoutesportland.org

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard from E Burnside to SE Washington Street, August 31 – September 21

(August 29, 2016)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures on SE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard from E Burnside to SE Washington Street, on Wednesday, August 31, through Wednesday, September 21, 7 a.m. through 4 p.m. each work day.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave 1.18 lane miles of pavement.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation