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Portland Bureau of Transportation

We keep Portland moving

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Portland's Street Seats 2014

Diners at the Street Seat in front of Bonfire Lounge(October 1, 2014)  As we head into the fall, the Street Seats installations from this summer continue to provide outdoor seating at many locations through the City.  Two new locations were recently installed at Bonfire Lounge (2821 SE Stark Street, designed by Propel Studio) and Lompoc Brewing (1620 NW 23rd Avenue, by Artifekt Architecture).  Portlanders can take advantage of the outdoor seating at most of Portland’s ten Street Seat locations throughout the year though some will be removed during the winter (please check with the local business about seating availability).

Street Seat in front of Lompoc Brewing

In addition, two finalists from the Design Week Portland design competition have been installed outside of the Center for Architecture (403 NW 11th Avenue). They will be in place through the end of October. The installations are a result of collaboration between the Bureau of Transportation and Center for Architecture in their second annual Street Seat Design Competition.  Of 17 submissions received from across the country addressing the theme ‘Active Streets,' two finalists were chosen to be installed as part of a six week installation outside of the Center for Architecture.  The winning submissions were developed by Hennebery Eddy Architects (“Log Dam”) and Scott Edwards Architects (“A Dialogue”).  Construction costs were covered by sponsor Hoffman Construction.  "A Dialogue" Street Seat designThe installations will find new homes along NE Alberta Street in the spring.

Now in its third year, Street Seats is a program of the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) that allows businesses and non-profit organizations to convert on-street parking into other public uses, such as café seating or a mini-park. Based on similar programs in San Francisco and New York City, the program enlivens the streetscape by creating spaces for Portlanders to enjoy seating and a meal or drink outdoors, which in turn enhances street vitality and benefits local businesses.

A map of Portland’s collection of Street Seats can be found by clicking here.

See more photos of the 2014 Street Seats on Flickr.

More information about City of Portland’s Street Seat program can be found at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/streetseats.  

Safety project coming to E Burnside in early-October

Fewer crashes, more parking spaces will be some of the benefits.

illustration of lane changes - E Burnside at 18th Ave(September 26, 2014)  The East Burnside Transportation Safety Project is scheduled to begin construction in early October on the first phase of improvements.  This High Crash Corridor project will restripe E Burnside St from 14th Ave to Laurelhurst Pl (just west of Cesar Chavez Blvd).  E Burnside will change from two lanes in each direction to one westbound lane, one center turn lane, and two eastbound lanes. The new configuration will add about 15 on-street parking spaces. A second phase in Spring 2015 will install three pedestrian islands and marked crossings at 18th, 22nd and 24th avenues on the west leg of each intersection and reduce the posted speed from 35 to 30 MPH.

This project was requested by adjacent business and neighborhood associations and developed in partnership with a Community Working Group.  Community members reviewing street planThe goals of the project are to reduce crashes, reduce speeds, improve pedestrian crossings and access to transit, and support the business district.  The treatment is expected to reduce crashes on this segment of E Burnside by about 30%.

For additional information including the why, what, and when of the project, check out the project brochure here, or visit the Burnside High Crash Corridor website.

Traveling on Going Street? Street maintenance to close sections starting Sept. 8

(September 3, 2014) - The Going Street Neighborhood Greenway, one of the most popular bike routes in the city, will get a fresh coat of sealant this month to improve the roadway and extend the life of the pavement for years to come.

Beginning Sept. 8 and continuing for up approximately 5 days, N & NE Going Street will be closed in three to four block sections so crews can fog seal the street from N Vancouver to Cesar Chavez Blvd.  Please note:

      • Each section will be closed for only one day. 
      • Follow the signed detour (see map below) and stay off the pavement while crews work and the fog sealant dries
      • Fog sealing is extremely sticky when applied. It will remain wet and sticky for up to eight hours after application. That’s why is it so important to protect yourself and ensure an effective treatment by keeping cars, truck, bicycles, children, pets, and your shoes off the pavement until all barricades and traffic control have been removed.
    • Bicycles may use the sidewalk but should use extreme caution as Going is a busy pedestrian thoroughfare. People choosing to ride on the sidewalk must proceed slowly and cautiously.

 

Fog seal is a coating of asphalt, recycled tire rubber, and grit blended locally in Portland. It is a cost-effective technique to maintain low-traffic streets, extending the life of the pavement and preventing more  costly and lengthy repairs later.

This preventive maintenance project is part of Mayor Charlie Hales’ and Commissioner Steve Novick’s  Back to Basics initiative to repair and improve at least 100 miles of streets during this fiscal year. The Back to Basics initiative prioritizes maintenance of the city's Neighborhood Greenway network of streets, like Going, that are optimized for bicycling and walking. 

Please help us improve Going Street for you and other travelers by staying off the pavement while it’s being sealed.

For more information about the Going project or other PBOT maintenance concerns, call the 24-hour hotline at 503-823-1700.

Going Street detour route

 

 

 

Welcome SmartTrips Targets New Movers for 2014

Program offers tips and tools for those finding their way around a new neighborhood

(July 23, 2014)  After 12 years of moving around the city to target specific neighborhoods, Portland’s residential SmartTrips program is taking a new approach for 2014.  SmartTrips, a program of the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Active Transportation Division, is focusing on people who have recently moved.

Delivering SmartTrips information by bike

Recent movers include new Portland residents - relocating from another city, state or country - and those who have recently changed residences within Portland. The thinking goes, when people move they must develop new patterns for everyday trips - shopping, library, school - and may be more open to making changes in how they get around.

Welcome SmartTrips sent out its first mailing to about 9000 residents on May 6 followed by a reminder postcard, a newsletter and an order form within a few weeks. Residents can order, either online or by mail, a variety of tools and resources for getting around Portland. Available resources include bike and walk maps, a digital pedometer, transit maps, information on carshare, schedules of guided walks and bike rides, travel safety tips and more. Water conservation tools and information are also offered.

To date, SmartTrips has received about 1500 orders for materials from new residents. Customized packets are delivered by bicycle to residents’ door steps within two weeks, and orders have come in from all reaches of the Portland area including Marine Drive, 184th Avenue in east Portland and the Multnomah/Washington County line on the west side. Three staff members typically ride 20-25 miles per day but have ridden as much as 40 miles on one delivery pulling trailers full of customized packages for new residents.  Trailer with bags for delivery

Funding for the SmartTrips program comes mostly from a Metro Regional Travel Options grant. These grants fund “projects to reduce the number of people driving alone, improve air quality and address community health issues.” Metro’s Regional Travel Options group is also focusing on new movers this year.

Over the ten years in existence, Portland’s Residential SmartTrips program has been able to effect an average 9 percent shift away from drive alone trips to more active modes – biking, walking, transit, etc. 

Transportation and community partnership delivers 84 new parking spaces to East Portland commercial areas.

East Portland Bike and Shop pilot serves 12 businesses and organizations

(July 21, 2014) - East Portland is enjoying 84 new bike parking spaces at 12 East Portland businesses and organizations after the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) recently completed the East Portland Bike and Shop project.  In partnership with community members and the East Portland Action Plan Municipal Partnership program, which provided funding to acquire and install the bike racks, PBOT brought much needed bike parking resources to a wide area of East Portland.

Baskins Robbins bike parkingThe project installed seven grouped bike cluster racks (typically called "corrals") and 21 individual bike racks to improve transportation choices for people traveling by bicycle and to provide increased customer access to dozens of East Portland businesses and organizations.

“I want to thank East Portland activists and the East Portland Action Plan for the hard work and partnership,” said City of Portland Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick. “This project demonstrates that in order to provide equal access we sometimes need to do things differently, including reevaluating our standard operating procedures to meet community goals. It’s an example of delivering on our promise to the people of East Portland to make it a safer and more convenient place to get around and to the businesses to improve connections to customers.”

East Portlanders had long flagged the lack of bicycle parking as one of the barriers to meeting daily needs by bike.  In meetings held over the last few years, community members noted that East Portland (along with SW Portland) face unique development patterns that preclude PBOT from providing the same quality and quantity of bike parking as other commercial corridors.

PBOT’s ubiquitous blue bike racks are public property. The racks are PBOT’s responsibility to maintain and are only installed in the public right of way – usually in the furnishing zone of the sidewalk adjacent to the businesses’ storefront.

Many of East Portland’s retail centers have large asphalt parking lots separating the sidewalk from the businesses’ front doors.  This separates a bike rack from a business’s front door by more than 100’, making bike parking inconvenient and inconspicuous to shoppers and clients. East Portland resident Jim Chasse wrote, “What most people don't know, or don't consider is, bike parking is so important to cyclists to protect their investment that we won't contribute to the economy if we don't have adequate facilities to lock our bikes to while we shop. This is a great start to encourage people to cycle more in East Portland!”

The project is a product of the East Portland in Motion plan, which called for installing bike parking on private property in approximately 10 locations.  Property owners assumed ownership and responsibility to maintain the racks. Previous City policy did not allow PBOT to donate bike racks to private businesses. In 2013, however, City Council gave the PBOT Director the right to provide such donations. East Portland community activists then helped identify potential locations and PBOT staff worked to secure business and property owner agreements.

 [photos by David Hampsten]

new bike racks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The project provided bike parking for a range of East Portland locations, including shopping plazas, social service and health care agencies, and individual businesses.  The full list of locations and bike parking facilities installed is included in the chart below.

 

# of Corrals

# of Staple Racks

# of Bike Parking Spaces

Multnomah County Aging and Disability Service (106th and SE Cherry Blossom)

 

4

8

Pizza Baron/Midway Plaza (122nd and SE Division)

1

 

6

Powell Villa (122nd and SE Powell)

2

5

22

Russellville Grange (121st and NE Prescott)

1

 

6

Rosewood Community Center (162nd and SE Stark)

 

4

8

Boss Hawgs Bar & Grill (102nd and NE Glisan)

1

 

6

IRCO Main Office (104th and NE Glisan)

 

4

8

Tina's Corner Café (122nd and SE Harold)

1

 

6

Tik Tok Restaurant (112th and SE Division)

1

 

6

Ed Benedict Park (104th and SE Bush)

 

4

8

Totals

7

21

84