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Creating Public Streets and Pedestrian Connections

Creating Public Streets and Pedestrian Connections through the Land Use and Building Permit Process

Development Services
503-823-7004
Accepted by City Engineer, Brant Williams
July 2002

 

Private development in the City of Portland may improve existing streets and/or create new streets. The Development Services Division in the Bureau of Transportation Engineering and Development has the task of ensuring that our transportation network is developed appropriately.
 
This document provides a range of design information and practices that support public street design through the land use and building permit process. This information is used by Development Services to establish street improvement requirements for land use reviews and building permits.
 
Information provided is based largely on existing documents and adopted practices. A list of references is included. Because not all possible scenarios can be anticipated, the reference documents and practices are considered the basis for decision making.
Contents

Section I - Connectivity and street/pedestrian improvements.......................................     Page 3
Section II - Criteria for determining street/pedestrian width and improvements.............     Page 4
 
     A.RF - R7 zoning...............................................................................................     Page 6
     B.R5 zoning.......................................................................................................     Page 8
     C.R3 - RX zoning.............................................................................................    Page 11
     D.Any zoning other than residential....................................................................    Page 13
Section III - Documents summary............................................................................    Page 15
Section IV - Administrative review process for technical decisions made
     under the authority of the City Engineer...............................................................    Page 16
 
Section I
Connectivity and Street/Pedestrian Improvements
 
 
The Transportation Planning Rule and Metro’s Regional Transportation Plan require local jurisdictions to provide for safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle circulation. The City’s Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan supports this goal through policy language stating that new and redeveloping areas should be served by interconnected public streets.
 
Connections should create short blocks, particularly in mixed-use areas of planned high-density development. Streets and pedestrian/bicycle accessways (where streets are not feasible) should connect to transit routes, schools, parks, and between and within residential neighborhoods and other activity centers. Metro’s adopted spacing standards are a maximum of 530 feet for streets and 330 feet for pedestrian/bicycleways where streets are not possible. In some parts of the City, street master plans provide further guidance on connectivity.
 
When a site is reviewed through the land use or building permit process, connectivity will be considered. A new street or street extension may be required as a condition of approval.
 
In addition, a site may have frontage on a street or right-of-way that is not improved to current standards. Adjacent properties are responsible for their frontage improvements (see Title 17.88.010). Where the right-of-way width is not sufficient, a dedication may be required. Where improvements are not up to standard, the developer may be required to obtain a street improvement permit and complete frontage improvements prior to building occupancy.
 
 
 
Possible connectivity and widening requirements should be researched early in the development process to avoid expensive alterations to plans at a later stage. If you have specific questions regarding a site, you may call 503-823-7884.

 

Section II
Street Improvements and Right-of-Way Width
for Public Streets
 
 
The following tables summarize the most common criteria affecting street design elements. Elements are those items that require horizontal space and, therefore, establish the amount of width needed for the public right-of-way. The public right-of-way is land dedicated to the public for street purposes. Right-of-way widths shown in the charts are the needed width for the full street improvement.
 
Information is presented based on land use zoning. Zoning is identified in the Official Zoning Maps. Classifications (traffic, pedestrian, bicycle) are listed in the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan.
 
Terms
  
ADT – Average Daily Traffic is the vehicle count over a 24-hour period (typically counted on a weekday) for the segment of road in question
  
Bicycle Classification – the street classification in the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan related to the desired bicycle use for the street
 
Connecting Street Length – the length of a dead-end street from the nearest public street intersection to the terminus of the dead-end street
 
Official Zoning Maps – maps showing comprehensive Plan and Zoning designations
 
Pavement Diameter – the width of the pavement across a turnaround or cul-de-sac bulb
 
Pedestrian Classification – the street classification in the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan related to the desired pedestrian use for the street
 
Pedestrian Connection – a public walkway not adjacent to a street. It may connect between two public streets, or between a public street and a public facility such as a school, library, park, community center, etc. The standard pedestrian connection includes a sidewalk and landscaped buffers on each side (which may also provide access for maintenance). Pedestrian connections may include other items (such as street lighting) which are not listed as elements
 
Roadway – the paved area typically reserved for vehicle use, including bicycles
 
Sidewalk Corridor – the area from the edge of the roadway to the edge of the right-of-way. Sidewalk corridors usually include the curb zone, the furnishing zone, the through pedestrian zone and the frontage zone (Portland Pedestrian Design Guide, 1998)
 
Street Improvements – items to be constructed to create a new street or pedestrian connection, or to widen or extend an existing street or pedestrian connection. The standard full-width street improvement includes vehicle travel lanes, parking lanes on one or more sides, and a sidewalk corridor on each side. Bicycle lanes may also be included. Street improvements also include many other items (such as street lighting and storm drainage) which are not listed as elements
 
Traffic Classification – the street classification in the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan related to the desired passenger vehicle use for the street
 
Travel Ways – defines whether an alley will carry one-way or two-way traffic
 
 
The following charts cover only the most common cases. In addition, exceptions may be made where there are topographic or existing development constraints, or where proposed improvements should match or transition to existing facilities. In any case, the City Engineer makes the final determination of elements and widths within the public right-of-way but such determinations are not intended to support pavement widths that are wider than described in this document.
 
 

 

A.    RF – R7 Zoning
 
Standard Through Street OR Dead-end less than 300’ in length (RF-R7)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Roadway widthz
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width
Local Service Street
None or one lane
20’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
10’ each frontage
40’
Local Service Street
None or one lane
20’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
44’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
26’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
10’ each frontage
46’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
26’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
50’
 
z Additional width for bicycle lanes in the roadway
Traffic Classification
Bicycle Classification
ADT
Additional Right-of-Way needed
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
< 3000
No additional width
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
­> 3000
5’ each bike lane*
* Additional pavement width to accommodate bicycle lanes shall be determined on a case-by-case basis. Existing parking patterns, street width, and the extent to which additional off-site right-of-way may be obtained, will be considered.
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
Standard Dead-end Street 300’ or more in length (RF-R7 zoning)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Road-way width
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width
Local Service Street
No on-street parking
20’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
10’ each frontage
40’
Local Service Street
No on-street parking
20’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
44’
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
10’ each frontage
48’
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
52’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
10’ each frontage
52’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
56’
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis
RF-R7 Zoning (continued)
 
Standard Cul-de-Sac (turnaround on a dead-end street) (RF-R7 zoning)
Traffic Classification
Connecting Street Length
Pavement Diameter
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width (dia.)
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
6.5’ combination curb/sidewalk with 5’ clear zone at the back of walk
83’
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’ sidewalk corridor
94’
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter, but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
6.5’ combination curb/sidewalk with 5’ clear zone at the back of walk
49’*
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter, but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’ sidewalk corridor
60’*
Any other case not listed above is designed on a case-by-case basis
* Width determined on a case-by-case basis
 
 
Alley (RF-R7 zoning)
Travel ways
Parking
Full Alley Width
Right-of-Way Width
Two-way
No parking allowed
19’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
20’
One-way
No Parking allowed
11’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
12’
 
 
Other Street Types (RF-R7 zoning)
Public streets including but not limited to substandard improvements, scenic drives and green streets are designed on a case-by case basis, with elements and widths determined by the City Engineer.
 
Partial Width Streets (RF-R7 zoning)
Partial width streets typically occur when only a single frontage or portion of frontage can be developed at one time. The partial width street components and resulting right-of-way width should be based on the appropriate parts of Charts above. Exceptions may occur where portions of the partial width street have been built already or where widths should more appropriately reflect adjacent existing street segments (as determined by the City Engineer).
 
 
Pedestrian Connections (RF – R7 zoning)
Zone
Sidewalk (Walkway) Width
Buffer width (edge of walkway to property line
Right-of-Way Width
RF – R7
6’
4.5’ each side
15’
For all zoning categories, care must be taken to ensure that the proposed alignment for a public pedestrian connection provides clear visibility through the length of the connection.

 

B.    R5 Zoning
 
Standard Through Street OR Dead-end less than 300’ in length
(R5 zoning)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Road-way widthz
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width
Local Service Street
None or one lane
20’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage
42’
Local Service Street
None or one lane
20’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
44�
Local Service Street
Two lanes
26’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage
48’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
26’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
50’
 
z Additional width for bicycle lanes in the roadway
Traffic Classification
Bicycle Classification
ADT
Additional Right-of-Way needed
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
< 3000
No additional width
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
­> 3000
5’ each bike lane*
* Additional pavement width to accommodate bicycle lanes shall be determined on a case-by-case basis. Existing parking patterns, street width, and the extent to which additional off-site right-of-way may be obtained, will be considered.
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Standard Dead-end Street 300’ or more in length (R5 zoning)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Roadway width
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width
Local Service Street
No on-street parking
20’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage
42’
Local Service Street
No on-street parking
20’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
44’
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage
50’
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
52’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage
54’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
56’
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis
 
 
Standard Cul-de-Sac (turnaround on a dead-end street) (R5 zoning)
Traffic Classification
Connecting Street Length
Pavement Diameter
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width (dia.)
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’
92’
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’
94’
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’
58’*
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’
60’*
Any other case not listed above is designed on a case-by-case basis
* Width determined on a case-by-case basis
 
 
Alley (R5 zoning)
Travel direction
Parking
Full Alley Width
Right-of-Way Width
Two-way
No parking allowed
19’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
20’
One-way
No Parking allowed
11’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
12’
 
 
Other Street Types (R5 zoning)
Public streets including but not limited to substandard improvements, scenic drives and green streets are designed on a case-by case basis, with elements and widths determined by the City Engineer.
 
Partial Width Streets (R5 zoning)
Partial width streets typically occur when only a single frontage or portion of frontage can be developed at one time. The partial width street components and resulting right-of-way width should be based on the appropriate parts of Charts above. Exceptions may occur where portions of the partial width street have been built already or where widths should more appropriately reflect adjacent existing street segments (as determined by the City Engineer).
 
 
Pedestrian Connections (R5 zoning)
Zone
Sidewalk (Walkway) Width
Buffer width (edge of walkway to property line
Right-of-way Width
R5
6’
4.5’ each side
15’
For all zoning categories, care must be taken to ensure that the proposed alignment for a public pedestrian connection provides clear visibility through the length of the connection.
 
 

 

C.    R3 - RX Zoning
  
Standard Through Street -OR- Dead-end (R3-RX zoning)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Roadway widthz
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width
Local Service Street
None
28’ **
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
*
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
50’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
54’
Local Service Street
None
28’**
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
*
Local Service Street
One lane
28’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
52’
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
46’
 
z Additional width for bicycle lanes in the roadway
Traffic Classification
Bicycle Classification
ADT
Additional Right-of-Way needed
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
< 3000
No additional width
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
> 3000
5’ each bike lane*
* Additional pavement width to accommodate bicycle lanes shall be determined on a case-by-case basis. Existing parking patterns, street width, and the extent to which additional off-site right-of-way may be obtained, will be considered.
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis.
* Width determined on a case-by-case basis
** In some cases it may be feasible to reduce the listed street width if parking is not needed and the Fire Bureau requirements are accommodated
*** For RH, RX, CN1, CM ,CS, CX or EX zoning where the site has frontage on a Neighborhood Collector, District Collector, or Major City Traffic street, AND the Local Service Street intersects with the Traffic Street listed here, the sidewalk corridor width on the Local Service Street frontage is 12’
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alley (R3 – RX zoning)
Travel ways
Parking
Full Alley Width
Right-of-Way Width
Two-way
No parking allowed
19’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
20’
One-way
No Parking allowed
11’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
12’
 
 
Standard Cul-de-Sac (turnaround on a dead-end street) (R3 – RX zoning)
Traffic Classification
Connecting Street Length
Pavement Diameter
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width (dia.)
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’
92’
Local Service Street
300’ or greater
70’
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’
94’
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’
58’*
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’
60’*
Any other case not listed above is designed on a case-by-case basis.
 
 
Other Street Types (R3 – RX zoning)
Public streets including but not limited to substandard improvements, scenic drives and green streets are designed on a case-by case basis, with elements and widths determined by the City Engineer.
 
Partial Width Streets (R3 – RX zoning)
Partial width streets typically occur when only a single frontage or portion of frontage can be developed at one time. The partial width street components and resulting right-of-way width should be based on the appropriate parts of Charts above. Exceptions may occur where portions of the partial width street have been built already or where widths should more appropriately reflect adjacent existing street segments (as determined by the City Engineer).
 
 
Pedestrian Connections (RX zoning)
Zone
Sidewalk (Walkway) Width
Buffer width (edge of walkway to property line
Right-of-Way Width
RX
Generally 8’ – 20’ but designed on a case-by-case basis
Minimum 5’ each side
18’ – 30’*
R3-RH
6’
4.5’ each side
15’
For all zoning categories, care must be taken to ensure that the proposed alignment for a public pedestrian connection provides clear visibility through the length of the connection.

 

D     Zoning Other than RF – RX
 
Standard Through Street -OR- Dead-end (Zoning other than RF- RX)
Traffic Classification
On-street Parking
Roadway widthz
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-way width
Local Service Street
None
28’ **
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
*
Local Service Street
One lane
28’ minimum
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
*
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’ minimum
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11’ each frontage***
*
Local Service Street
None
28’ **
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
*
Local Service Street
One lane
28’ minimum
Local Service Street in a Pedestrian District
-OR- City Walkway
12’ each frontage
*
Local Service Street
Two lanes
32’ minimum
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
12’ each frontage
*
 
z Additional width for bicycle lanes in the roadway
Traffic Classification
Bicycle Classification
ADT
Additional Right-of-Way needed
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
< 3000
No additional width
Local Service Street
City Bikeway
­> 3000
5’ each bike lane*
Additional pavement width to accommodate bicycle lanes shall be determined on a case-by-case basis. Existing parking patterns, street width, and the extent to which additional off-site right-of-way may be obtained, will be considered.
Other cases not listed above are designed on a case-by-case basis.
* Width determined on a case-by-case basis
** In some cases it may be feasible to reduce the listed street width if parking is not needed and the Fire Bureau requirements are accommodated
*** For RH, RX, CN1, CM , CS, CX or EX zoning where the site has frontage on a Neighborhood Collector, District Collector, or Major City Traffic street, and the Local Service Street intersects with the Traffic Street listed here, the sidewalk corridor width on the Local Service Street frontage is 12’
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alley (Zoning other than RF – RX)
Travel ways
Parking
Full Alley Width
Right-of-Way Width
Two-way
No parking allowed
19’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
20’
One-way
No Parking allowed
11’ + 1’ for curbs and/or buffer
12’
 
Zoning Other than RF – RX continued on next page
Zoning Other than RF – RX (continued)
 
 
Standard Cul-de-Sac (turnaround on a dead-end street)
(Zoning other than RF – RX)
Traffic Classification
Connecting Street Length
Pavement Diameter
Pedestrian Classification
Sidewalk Corridor width
Right-of-Way width (dia.)
Local Service Street
300™ or greater
70™
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11™
92™
Local Service Street
300™ or greater
70™
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12™
94™
Local Service Street
Less than 300™
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Street NOT in a Pedestrian District
11™
58™*
Local Service Street
Less than 300’
Typ. 36’ in diameter but designed on a case-by case basis
Local Service Streetin a Pedestrian District
12’
60’*
Any other case not listed above is designed on a case-by-case basis
 
 
 
Other Street Types (Zoning other than RF RX)
Public streets including but not limited to substandard improvements, scenic drives and green streets are designed on a case-by-case basis, with elements and widths determined by the City Engineer.
 
Partial Width Streets (Zoning other than RF – RX)
Partial width streets typically occur when only a single frontage or portion of frontage can be developed at one time. The partial width street components and resulting right-of-way width should be based on the appropriate parts of Charts above. Exceptions may occur where portions of the partial width street have been built already or where widths should more appropriately reflect adjacent existing street segments (as determined by the City Engineer).
 
 
Pedestrian Connection (Zoning other than RF – RX)
Zone
Sidewalk (Walkway) Width
Buffer width (edge of walkway to property line
Right-of-Way Width
CN1, CM,
CS or CX
Generally 8’ – 20’ but designed on a case-by-case basis
Minimum 5’ each side
18’ – 30’ suggested
Other
Designed on a case-by-case basis
 
 

 

Section III
Codes, Manuals, and Other Documents
Used in the Street Design Process
 
 
A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets (American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials)  Geometric design policy for streets considering function, design controls, design and cross section elements and intersections
 
AASHTO Guide for Design of Pavement Structures (American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials) Design policy for determining pavement sections for roadways
 
Bicycle Master Plan  (City of Portland, 1998)City policies and objectives regarding bicycles, recommended bikeway network and end-of-trip facilities. Guidelines for bicycle facilities in Appendix A.
 
Central City Transportation Management Plan (City of Portland, 1995) – Transportation goals and policies for the Central City, including district strategies, and street classifications
 
Design Guide for Public Street Improvements (City of Portland, 1993) – Guide for consulting engineers containing basic design and submittal information for street improvements including, review process, traffic design, street design and cost estimates
 
Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (Federal Highway Administration) – Design and usage guide for traffic signs signals and pavement markings. This document is supplemented with the City of Portland Sign Library
 
Pedestrian Master Plan (City of Portland, 1998) – Policies for pedestrian travel, improvement projects and priorities
 
Pedestrian Design Guide (City of Portland, 1998) – Guidelines for public sidewalk corridors, crosswalks, pathways and stairs.
 
Standard Construction Specifications (City of Portland) – Standard construction specifications for use when designing and constructing civil infrastructure including contract and technical requirements, streets, sewer and water, and standard drawings
 
Title 17 of the City Code Public Improvements – (City of Portland) – Authority for various regulations and improvements under the City Engineer (and the Chief Engineer for Environmental Services) including local improvements; permits; sidewalks, curbs and driveways; street improvements; sewer and stormwater regulations; public utilities and others
 
Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan (City of Portland) – Part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan, it includes transportation policy, street classifications and district policies
 
Others:
Various street master plans and street improvement plans including but not limited to:
  
SW and Far SE Master Street Plan
River District Right-of-Way Framework Plans
Barbur Boulevard Streetscape Plan
NE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Transportation Project
Captitol Highway Plan,
Multnomah County Street Plans
Airport Way Secondary Infrastructure Plan
Lloyd District Transportation Design Criteria
 
 
Section IV
Administrative Review Process for Technical
Decisions for Street Design
 
 
If you believe a significant error was made in a decision regarding a proposed street improvement, we encourage you to contact the Transportation Development Review staff or Permit Engineer. Generally, you can obtain the name of the Transportation staff who worked on the development by calling (503) 823-7884 and providing the land use case or building permit number.
 
If after working with Transportation staff, you still believe a technical decision was in error, you may request a review of that decision by following this process:
 
1.     Write a letter to the City Engineer (in care of the Development Services Manager). In your letter please include the land use case or building permit number, the Transportation staff person you worked with, and a clear description of the problem and why you think the decision was incorrect. If information is not documented in your letter it cannot be considered.
 
2.      The Development Services Manager will review your appeal and consult with staff and the City Engineer as needed. You may be contacted for additional information. A written response will be provided. The timeline for a response may vary depending on the complexity of the issue. The City Engineer may choose to delay an impacted project while the review is being considered. Decisions made by the City Engineer for administrative reviews are final.

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