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Portland Water Bureau

From forest to faucet, we deliver the best drinking water in the world.

GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

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News Release: Main Break at NE 69th and Halsey

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Update: August 3, 11:30 am
Main Break at NE 69th and Halsey

The Portland Water Bureau is in the process of repairing a main break that occurred early this morning at the corner of NE 69th Ave and NE Halsey. An eight-inch diameter pipe made of cast iron in 1956 had split along an 18-foot length.

Thirty-six services along NE 69th Ave between Halsey and Hassalo now have their water service shut off, including some multi-familydwellings.

The Water Bureau is on the scene making repairs, and anticipates returning water to those affected services by end of the day. A temporary patch will be placed over the street repair, and the Bureau of Maintenance will be back later in the week to permanently patch the street where the pipe has been repaired. 

The Water Bureau does not currently know the reason for the pipe breaking. It is being replaced with a pipe made of ductile iron, which is more flexible than older cast iron pipes.

Call the Portland Water Bureau for more information at (503) 823-7404.

 

News Release: Main Break at NE 69th and Halsey

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Media Advisory

August 3, 2011

Update: 3:30 PM
Main Break at NE 69th and Halsey

The Portland Water Bureau has replaced an 20 foot section of an eight-inch diameter pipe installed in 1956. Thirty-six services along NE 69th Ave between Halsey and Hassalo now have their water service restored. After the damaged section of pipe was replaced, Water Bureau crews flushed the isolated portion of the system and recharged the services that had been shut off.

Customers who had their services shut off are advised to run water in their bathtubs or showers for a few minutes to clear the lines of any residual dirt or air pockets. Water quality was not affected by the main break and the water is safe to drink and use.

The break occurred shortly before 4:00 AM today. The ruptured pipe was split along an 18-foot length and discharged an estimated 20,000 gallons into the street, according to Water Bureau engineers. A stormwater pipe was damaged as a result of the main break and a portion of the pipe trench has not been covered so that Bureau of Envoironmental Services staff can assess the damage and make necessary repairs. A temporary patch has been placed over most of the street repair area, and the Bureau of Maintenance will be back later in the week to permanently patch the street where the pipe has been repaired. 

News Release: Portland Water Bureau to Run Groundwater Supply System

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News Release: August 4th, 2011


Portland Water Bureau to Run Groundwater Supply System 

On Tuesday, August 9th, the Portland Water Bureau will begin blending a small portion of water from the Columbia South Shore Well Field into the distribution system as part of a maintenance operation. The groundwater maintenance operation is expected to discontinue by August 23, 2011. 

The rate of groundwater pumping will vary throughout each day. Groundwater will be pumped at a rate of approximately 18 million gallons of groundwater per day during work hours, but no pumping will occur at night. The resultant average contribution of groundwater to the system will be approximately five million gallons per day over approximately 10 days, which represents about three percent of the total daily water demand. 

Residential customers will experience a minimal change in water quality. Customers with water quality questions are encouraged to call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

The groundwater supply is a complex system composed of pumps, chemical feed systems, electronic controls, and other appurtenances; it must be operated regularly to identify maintenance needs and issues. By doing this maintenance operation, the bureau will ensure the reliability of the system when needed, either in an emergency or as part of seasonal supply.

For more information on Portland Water Bureau operations, visit www.portlandonline.com/water.

Extreme Heat + No Water = Misery in Texas Town

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Extreme Heat + No Water = Misery in Texas Town

The weather in Portland - a chilly 66 degrees in August - may have some of us scratching our heads. But in middle America folks are sweltering.

Here's a news story that made us snap to attention: In Kemp, Texas, the Mayor has shut off the entire water supply to the city! As temperatures soared to the triple digits for the 37th consecutive day Sunday, city officials made an emergency decision to shut off the town's water supply.

Read all about it here:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/08/08/heat.wave/

 

Best practices for outdoor irrigation

Water your landscape efficiently this summer

Summer landscape irrigation is an importantpart of creating vibrant outdoor spaces – but it takes time and costs money. 

A well-designed and well-maintained irrigation system will use water efficiently while creating a healthy landscape for years to come.

How you choose to irrigate depends on your budget, the type of plants you have, and size of your landscape. Regardless of what you use to irrigate - a hose, drip, or automatic irrigation system - there are several best practices that are important to follow:

 Best Practices for Irrigation

  • Prepare the soil to ensure proper drainage and water- holding capacity by adding organic materials such as compost. Healthy soil needs less water than poor soil.
  • Group plants with similar irrigation needs together and research plants that are appropriate for the location and condition of the site.
  • Water when the potential for evaporation is low – late in the evening and early in the morning.
  • Actively manage and maintain your irrigation system. Check regularly for leaks and misdirected spray.
  • Use a watering gauge (or tuna can) to help you water lawns 1 inch of water per week (more during long, hot dry spells). Water lawns separately from other plants. A good rule-of-thumb for watering your landscape is to apply 50% of what you put on grass, on perennials and shrubs, and 75% for vegetables (although new starts require more water).

To get helpful brochures on general landscape planning and maintenance, or information on finding an irrigation contractor visit  www.portlandoregon.gov/water/conservation

Also visit www.conserveh2o.org to sign up for the Weekly Watering Number