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Portland Water Bureau

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1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

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It's Not Too Late - View the Recommended Visible Features Concept for the Washington Park Reservoir Project and Offer Feedback

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UPDATE -- March 3, 2014
Virtual Open House Now Closed

Thank you for taking the time to comment on the recommended concept for the visible features of the Washington Park Reservoir Improvement Project.  The virtual open house is now closed. We appreciate your responses and feedback.

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The Portland Water Bureua Wants Your Feedback!

Throughout this month, the Portland Water Bureau is seeking feedback on the community recommended concept for the visible features of the Washington Park Reservoir Improvement Project through a virtual online open house. Comments collected will be shared with the project team and the Community Sounding Board, who are park users, neighborhood association representatives, and Portland Parks & Recreation staff providing project input and feedback to the Portland Water Bureau.


Click here to enter the online open house.


Project Information
The Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project will replace upper Reservoir 3 with a 15-million gallon underground tank and repurpose the existing Reservoir 4 to serve as an overflow and stormwater retention/de-chlorination facility. In addition, due to a historic landslide – dating back to the original reservoir construction in 1894 -- the Water Bureau must take steps to stabilize the hillside. The project is slated to start in spring 2016 and be completed by December 2020.

Tim Hall
Public Information

NEWS RELEASE 02/25/14: Regional Water Providers Provide Important Information on Reducing Lead in Drinking Water

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Twice a year, drinking water utilities test high-risk homes for lead levels, drawing water samples which have been ‘standing’ in the pipes for several hours. Recent drinking water samples collected by regional water providers in the Bull Run service area show an elevated presence of lead (just over 15 parts per billion in some of the homes).  

The major source of lead in the tap water of Portland homes is the corrosive action of water on plumbing components that contain lead, such as faucets and lead-based solder. By far the biggest sources of lead exposure are lead-based paint and lead-contaminated dust or soil, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 10 to 20 percent of a person’s potential exposure to lead may come from drinking water.

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources, especially for pregnant women and children 6 years and younger. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body.

Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development.

There are simple ways to reduce exposure to lead in water. If water has been standing in pipes for several hours, consumers can reduce lead exposure from plumbing by running their water until it is noticeably cold. Hot water is more corrosive than cold water, so it is more likely to contain lead – that’s why it is important to use only cold water for cooking, drinking, and particularly when making baby formula or juice.

The Portland Water Bureau (PWB) has been treating Bull Run drinking water to make it less corrosive by raising the pH of the water, but in this round of tests the lead levels were over the level that triggers educational outreach (including this news release) and corrective actions.

“Ideally, all plumbing fixtures would be lead-free, but they aren’t,” said PWB Administrator David Shaff. “The next best option is to inform our customers, and provide them with the knowledge to protect themselves and their families.”

There are steps customers can take to reduce their exposure to lead in your water:

  • Run your water to flush the lead out. If the water has not been used for several hours, run each tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes or until it becomes colder before drinking or cooking.
  • Use cold, fresh water for cooking and preparing baby formula. Do not cook with or drink water from the hot water tap; lead dissolves more easily into hot water. Do not use water from the hot water tap to make baby formula.
  • Do not boil water to remove lead. Boiling water will not reduce lead.
  • Consider using a filter. Check whether it reduces lead – not all filters do. Be sure to maintain and replace a filter device in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions to protect water quality. Contact NSF International at 800-NSF-8010 or www.nsf.org for information on performance standards for water filters.
  • Test your child for lead. Ask your physician or call the LeadLine to find out how to have your child tested for lead. A blood lead  level test is the only way to know if your child is being exposed to lead.
  • Test your water for lead. Call the LeadLine at 503-988-4000 to find out how to get a FREE lead-in-water test.
  • Regularly clean your faucet aerator. Particles containing lead from solder or household plumbing can become trapped in your faucet aerator. Regularly cleaning every few months will remove these particles and reduce your exposure to lead.
  • Consider buying low-lead fixtures.  As of January 4, 2014 all pipes, fittings and fixtures are required to contain less than 0.25% lead. When buying new fixtures, consumers should seek out those with the lowest lead content. 

To get your water tested for lead or for more information on reducing lead exposure around your home or building and the health effects of lead, contact the LeadLine at 503-988-4000, or visit their website at www.leadline.org.

Tim Hall
Public Information

TRAFFIC ADVISORY 02/21/14: Lane Shifts on SE Powell Boulevard, between SE 97th & SE 100th Avenues, Begin Sunday, February 23rd to Prepare for Water Vault Construction

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During the night and early morning hours beginning Sunday, February 23, through Tuesday, February 25, 2014, Portland Water Bureau crews must close one lane of westbound traffic on SE Powell Boulevard between SE 97th Avenue and SE 100th Avenue, to prepare a work zone for an upcoming water vault excavation project. Motorists traveling east and westbound on SE Powell Boulevard will be directed by flaggers past the work zone.

After the preparation work and scheduled to start on Wednesday, February 26, 2014, a contractor for the Portland Water Bureau will begin a four-month long project to construct a large concrete vault under the westbound lane in the 9700 block of SE Powell Boulevard, directly in front of the Central Church of the Nazarene. The 30 foot wide by 60 foot long vault will house complex piping that will connect to the city’s new 25-million gallon underground reservoir atop Kelly Butte.

This work was previously scheduled to begin in early February, but was delayed due to inclement weather.

What motorists traveling on SE Powell Boulevard need to know:

  • During the vault construction, there will be no traffic lane closures on SE Powell Boulevard.
  • East and westbound traffic lanes on SE Powell Boulevard, between SE 97th Avenue and SE 100th Avenue, will be shifted around the work zone. 
  • The bicycle lane on that section of SE Powell Boulevard will be closed for safety reasons during the construction.
  • Northbound access to Interstate 205 freeway will be open.
  • The sidewalk along the south-side of SE Powell Boulevard will be open.
  • The sidewalk on the north-side of SE Powell Boulevard will be closed.
  • TriMet’s bus stops on SE Powell Boulevard near the work zone will be open. 

Please use caution when traveling on SE Powell Boulevard. Be sure to watch for construction workers, be ready for sudden stops, and obey all traffic controls and flaggers. To avoid traffic delays, motorists and bicyclists should use alternate routes. 

Construction of the vault is scheduled for completion this summer 2014, under normal weather conditions.

The Kelly Butte Reservoir will serve Portland’s east-side water customers, and be a stopover to supply water to the Washington Park Reservoir and southwest Portland area water storage tanks.

For additional information on the Kelly Butte Reservoir project, visit http://www.portlandoregon.gov/water/kellybutte.

Lindsay Wochnick
Public Information 

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Water Bureau Submits FY 2014-15 Requested Budget

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On February 3, 2014, the Portland Water Bureau submitted its Fiscal Year 2014-15 Requested Budget to the City’s Budget Office.   

The Requested Budget and rate proposal was extensively reviewed and then unanimously approved by the Water Bureau’s Budget Advisory Committee (BAC).  The BAC consists of volunteer members of the public, front-line staff, and labor representatives who provided input and feedback on the bureau’s five year Capital Improvement Program and budget priorities from bureau directors and senior managers.

Staff from the Office of Management and Finance, Commissioner Nick Fish’s policy director, and members of the Portland Utility Review Board (PURB) participated. There was also an opportunity at each open meeting for public comments.

One of the BAC members noted, “The bureau is to be commended for keeping rate increases down despite many infrastructure challenges. It has been a pleasure to serve on this committee. We appreciate the management leadership and Commissioner Fish’s engagement.”

The next steps in the budget process include public hearings, City Budget Office budget review, and City Council work sessions. In late April 2014, Mayor Charlie Hales will release the proposed budget decisions and then on June 19, 2014, the City Council will vote to adopt next year’s budget.

To review the Water Bureau’s FY 2014-15 Requested Budget, visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/water/requestedbudgetFY14-15

Lindsay Wochnick
Public Information 

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Public Invited to “Online” Open House; Provide Your Feedback on the Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project

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New Reservoir 3? 
New Reservoir 3? 

Throughout this month, the Portland Water Bureau is seeking feedback on the community recommended concept for the visible features of the Washington Park Reservoir Improvement Project through a virtual online open house. Comments collected will be shared with the project team and the Community Sounding Board, who are park users, neighborhood association representatives, and Portland Parks & Recreation staff providing project input and feedback to the Portland Water Bureau.

Click here to enter the online open house.


Over the past seven months, the Portland Water Bureau has held multiple open houses, Community Sounding Board meetings, community briefings and hosted a mailing list and project website to facilitate gathering public input and feedback about the project. Visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/water/wpreservoirs to learn more and explore the various ways to provide project feedback.

The Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project will replace upper Reservoir 3 with a 15-million gallon underground tank and repurpose the existing Reservoir 4 to serve as an overflow and stormwater retention/de-chlorination facility. In addition, due to a historic landslide – dating back to the original reservoir construction in 1894 -- the Water Bureau must take steps to stabilize the hillside.

The project is slated to start in spring 2016 and be completed by December 2020.

Tim Hall
Public Information

Join the Portland Water Bureau's Online Community!  
Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook. See us on Flickr.