Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

Portland Water Bureau

From forest to faucet, we deliver the best drinking water in the world.

GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info


Q: What do pirates and groundwater have in common? A: Buried treasure!

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Ahoy, mateys! It’s time for this year’s Aquifer Adventure!     

Join the Portland Water Bureau and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council for Aquifer Adventure, a free pirate-themed festival all about groundwater.

Date: Saturday, September 17, 2016
Time: 12 - 4 p.m.
Location: 16650 NE Airport Way Portland, Oregon 97230

Come dressed in yer finest pirate garb ready to celebrate the importance of groundwater, the buried treasure critical to our region’s drinking water system.

Learn how to protect groundwater while you search for hidden treasure, set sail on a pirate canoe, build an edible aquifer, travel through rock layers as a drop of groundwater, and more.

The event is suitable for all ages, with free T-shirts for the first 300 kids. No registration is required and all of the activities are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Food will be available for purchase.

For more information, click here. We hope you can join us!

Fall 2016 Customer Newsletter

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Fall 2016 Customer Newsletter

Each quarter, the Bureau of Environmental Services and the Portland Water Bureau offer important information on rebates, payment options, drinking water quality, and water efficiency tips in printed inserts that accompany your sewer-stormwater-water bill. 

In the Fall 2016 statement, customers will find a newsletter highlighting how we’re preparing for the “Big One,” three simple actions you can take today to ready your family for an emergency, and details on a long-term project to seismically strengthen key water infrastructure on Portland’s west side.

Take a look inside your bill or access the Customer Newsletter online.

TRAFFIC ADVISORY 09/08/16: Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project Breaks Ground, Temporary Impacts to Travel & Parking

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Downloadable file: Traffic Advisory
Downloadable file: Brochure

The Portland Water Bureau and contractor Hoffman Construction Company have begun an eight-year capital improvement project to update the Washington Park reservoir site.

The project complies with federal and state mandates, seismically strengthens key water infrastructure on Portland’s west side, and helps ensure a healthy, resilient, and secure water system. 

The project will span from 2016 to 2024. During the first two years, major earthwork will occur along with the construction of shoring walls and the new underground reservoir. This will trigger the most significant impacts to TriMet bus service, traffic, transportation, and parking in the park.

Park users are encouraged to move safely around the park. Please watch for detours and signage and follow direction from flaggers. The public should not follow construction vehicles or buses as they may enter restricted zones. All construction-related traffic impacts are subject to change.

To avoid delays, plan ahead and visit Explore Washington Park and TriMet for transit options in the park. Please consider taking public transit and the Explore Washington Park Free Shuttle. The shuttle runs weekends only now through October 31 and will resume service in the spring.

From September 12, 2016 through March 2018, the following traffic restrictions will be in place:

ROAD CLOSURES

  • SW Sacajawea Blvd. will be completely closed to all vehicle and bike traffic and pedestrian use from the intersection of SW Sacajawea Blvd./SW Rose Park Rd./SW Wright Rd. to SW Park Pl.
  • SW Sherwood Blvd. will be closed to all vehicles from SW Kingston Ave. to the Soccer Field.
  • SW Sherwood Blvd. will be closed to all vehicles, bikes, and pedestrians from the Soccer Field to SW Sacajawea Blvd.

OPEN FOR PEDESTRIANS/BIKES/TOUR BUSES/SHUTTLE

  • The sidewalk of SW Sherwood Blvd. will remain open for pedestrian use and bike traffic from SW Kingston Ave. to the Soccer Field.

TRAFFIC REVERSAL

  • Traffic flow will be reversed on SW Lewis Clark Way. One-way traffic will travel SW Lewis Clark Way and exit the park on SW Park Place.

MULTI-USE SHARED PATH

  • Starting Sept. 16, 2016, a designated paved-path separate from vehicles will be available on SW Lewis Clark Way. Pedestrians and cyclists can use the path to travel both in and out of the park on SW Lewis Clark Way. Cyclists are required to walk and not ride bicycles on the path.
  • Prior to Sept. 16, pedestrians are encouraged to use the stairs by the Lewis and Clark Memorial Column or be escorted around SW Lewis Clark Way.

TRAILS

  • Pedestrians and cyclists can enter and exit the Madison Court Trail on SW Madison St. and SW Sacajawea Blvd. The trail will close intermittently; watch for signage.
  • The Mac Trail will remain open. Pedestrians are cautioned to watch for trucks where the trail intersects with SW Sherwood Blvd. and SW Sacajawea Blvd.

NO PARKING

  • All parking spaces closed on SW Sacajawea Blvd., SW Sherwood Blvd., and SW Lewis Clark Way.

TRIMET BUS SERVICE

  • Line 63 - Washington Park/Arlington Heights will be detoured and stops 6177, 4346 and 4343 will be closed. Check TriMet.org for updates.

PARK ENTRANCES AND EXITS
During this stage of construction:

  • Three park entrances will be available: W Burnside Rd. to SW Tichner Dr.; SW Fairview Blvd. to SW Knights Blvd.; and SW Canyon Rd. to SW Knights Blvd.
  • Four park exits will be available: SW Tichner Dr. to W Burnside Rd.; SW Fairview Blvd. to SW Knights Blvd.; SW Lewis Clark Way to SW Park Pl.; and SW Knights Blvd. to SW Canyon Rd.

The project entails constructing a new 12.4-million gallon, seismically reinforced below ground reservoir in the same footprint of existing Reservoir 3 (upper) with a reflecting pool/water feature on top. The new reservoir will preserve the historic drinking water function provided by the original reservoirs and be engineered to withstand ongoing landslide encroachment and potentially catastrophic effects of a major earthquake.

When complete and online, the new reservoir will supply water to Portland’s west side and serve more than 360,000 people, including all downtown businesses and residents, 20 schools, three hospital complexes, more than 60 parks, and the Oregon Zoo.

Existing Reservoir 4 (lower) will be disconnected from the public drinking water system and a lowland wildlife habitat area, bioswale, and reflecting pool will be constructed in the basin.

For additional project information and updates, contact 503-823-7030, e-mail Lindsay.Wochnick@portlandoregon,gov, or visit www.portlandoregon.gov/water/wpreservoirs.

Protecting Our Bull Run Watershed

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Semi-annual inspections of public trails  
Lead Watershed Ranger Dan and Watershed Ranger Ken (pictured) completed an inspection of the 6.5 mile southern section of the PCT and Huckleberry Trail, from Lolo Pass to Lost Lake.

To support the Bull Run Treatment Variance, the Portland Water Bureau’s watershed rangers conduct semi-annual inspections of public trails that pass near the Bull Run Watershed. 

During these inspections, watershed rangers hike anywhere from three to 11 miles, inspecting portions of both the Oneonta Creek Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT).  Rangers look for signs of trespass, unauthorized side-trail construction, human and domesticated animal waste, and other suspicious activity.  Rangers also assess, post, and maintain Bull Run “No Trespassing” signage along these trails. 

In an effort to both better educate members of the public and gauge the level of public trail use, rangers also conduct brief on-trail question and answer sessions with any hikers encountered.

Inspections of the Oneonta Creek Trail and the northern section of the PCT (Indian Mountain to Lost Lake) are scheduled for later in August 2016.

Five Things to Know About the Treatment Variance 

  1. On March 14, 2012 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued the Portland Water Bureau a variance from the federal drinking water rules requiring the treatment of Bull Run drinking water for Cryptosporidium. As a result of the variance the Portland Water Bureau does not treat for Cryptosporidium.
  2. The treatment variance was issued in accordance with federal and state law and is valid for 10 years.
  3. OHA issued the treatment variance based on the Water Bureau’s comprehensive LT2 Treatment Variance Request.
  4. The variance requires the Water Bureau to maintain or strengthen all existing legal and operational protections for the Bull Run, monitor the watershed on a routine basis to eliminate unauthorized entry, maintain strict controls for sanitary facilities within the watershed, and develop and implement an approved plan for conducting field inspections and environmental monitoring in the Bull Run Watershed.
  5. The variance requires the Water Bureau to conduct Observation Monitoring for Cryptosporidium at the Bull Run intake at least two days each week and each day when the turbidity is greater than 2.0 NTU.

In an Emergency, Everyone Has a Role to Play

By Jaymee Cuti Add a Comment

September is National Preparedness Month. At the Portland Water Bureau, we prepare as part of our daily work - hardening the backbone of our water system and building storage that will last for generations. In an emergency, everyone has a role to play. What’s your role?

One of the most important things you can do to prepare for an emergency is to have an emergency kit that includes water. People can survive for weeks without food, but only a few days without water. In the Pacific Northwest, your kit should be able to sustain your entire household (pets too!) for 14 days. Experts predict that our region is overdue for a major earthquake that will severely damage water systems and other infrastructure. When this occurs, it will take time for emergency supplies to reach the greater Portland-metro area. You will need to rely on your own resources until help arrives.

Throughout September, we’ll be sharing your neighbors’ stories of storing water and other supplies for an emergency like a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake.

Join them by making a short video about your water storage and posting it at www.facebook.com/portlandwaterbureau. Those who submit videos are entered to win a LifeStraw personal water filter.

Safely storing water for an emergency is an important step in getting your emergency kit together. Need help getting started?

• See HOW to store your emergency H2O. http://bit.ly/storing-H2O

• See WHERE to store your emergency H2O. http://bit.ly/storing-H2O

• See WHAT types of containers to use for your emergency H2O. http://bit.ly/storing-H2O

• Using your own containers to store water for an emergency? Here’s how: http://bit.ly/storing-H2O