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Portland Water Bureau

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GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

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April 24, 2015


Photo slideshow courtesy of the Portland Water Bureau's Flickr Photostream

In March 2015, the two cells composing the new 25-million gallon underground reservoir at Kelly Butte in southeast Portland were successfully placed online. The reservoir now serves Bull Run water to customers across the City of Portland and beyond.

By the NumbersThe Portland Water Bureau and Hoffman Construction Company crews began work on the project in late 2012 with demolition of the 43-year-old, 10-million gallon above ground steel tank.

Close to a year of excavation on the butte followed with the removal of about 180,000 cubic yards of rock and soil to make way for the new underground tank two-and-a-half times the old tank's size. 

Beginning in the fall of 2013, more than 2,000 truckloads of concrete were brought onsite, pouring the reservoir’s floor.

By summer 2014, the reservoir’s wall, roof, and support columns were completed.

The underground reservoir has now disappeared from view completely, being covered with onsite earthwork.

Also constructed onsite is a stormwater detention basin, an overflow detention basin, multiple vaults, and valve structures.

Work at the site will continue through 2015 with construction of access roads, fencing, landscaping and the strategic planting of more than 1,660 trees and 7,250 shrubs across the entire site. The total project cost was estimated at $90 million and is currently projected to finish under this budget.

The Kelly Butte Reservoir will serve Portland's east side and be a stopover to supply water to the Washington Park reservoir and southwest Portland area water storage tanks.

 

February 27, 2015

February 2015 aerial view of Kelly Butte Reservoir worksite
February 2015 aerial view of Kelly Butte Reservoir worksite

Functional testing of the new reservoir and valves will be complete within the next few months. Crews are now working to backfill around and on top of the underground reservoir with onsite earthwork. During February and March, the reservoir and piping are scheduled to undergo disinfection.

Take a look back at the progress each year in February:

February 2013 aerial view
February 2013 aerial view

February 2014 aerial view 
February 2014 aerial view

January 26, 2015

January 2015 aerial photo of Kelly Butte Reservoir worksite
Early January 2015 aerial photo of Kelly Butte Reservoir worksite

On schedule and in just over two years, the Portland Water Bureau and Hoffman Construction Company crews have completed construction of the 25-million gallon underground reservoir, overflow basin, and an intricate network of underground piping, multiple vaults, and valve structures at Kelly Butte in southeast Portland.

The underground reservoir’s 394-foot by 296-foot floor, walls, 252 supporting columns, and roof were strategically poured during 2013 and 2014. 

Backfill around reservoir
Crews backfilling around the reservoir

Functional testing of the new reservoir and valves will be complete within the next few months. Crews are now working to backfill around and on top of the underground reservoir with onsite earthwork. During February and March, the reservoir and piping are scheduled to undergo disinfection.

Improving the Landscape

Re-vegetation plan at Kelly ButteA year ago, crews removed non-native and invasive plants, dead and diseased trees, and unfortunately a few healthy trees to accommodate the footprint for the new underground reservoir. On the east and north side of the butte, the tree canopy that is dominated by Douglas-Fir and Big Leaf Maple trees was largely left intact. 

Within the next couple months, the Water Bureau and Hoffman Construction crews will undertake a comprehensive re-vegetation management project on the butte. An important part of the approved land use review application, the project includes the strategic planting of more than 1,660 trees and 7,250 shrubs across the entire site.

Planting areas will be maintained so that the newly planted trees and clusters of shrubs are free to grow. 

To help prevent and mitigate soil erosion, especially on the hillside slope, crews seeded ground cover plants which have already begun sprouting across the butte. 

What’s Next

  • Conduct site landscaping and restoration efforts, including mitigation plantings.
  • Install permanent gates and fencing around the reservoir.
  • Develop maintenance roads, providing access to the reservoir and supporting structures.

The entire project is slated for completion by the end of 2015.

The Kelly Butte Reservoir will serve Portland's east side and be a stopover to supply water to the Washington Park reservoir and southwest Portland area water storage tanks. 

December 10, 2014


December 2014 Aerial Photo of Kelly Butte Reservoir worksite

By December 2014, crews completed pouring the reservoir’s 400-foot by 300-foot floor and roof, as well as 252 supporting columns, and its five walls (four sides, one divider wall). Reservoir testing is in progress.

November 18, 2014

Installation of Traffic Signal Pole at SE 100th Ave. & SE Powell Blvd. Scheduled for November 20-21; No Lane Closures
Portland Water Bureau contractor Hoffman Construction Company will shut down power to a temporary traffic signal pole.

WHERE: SE 100th Avenue and SE Powell Boulevard

WHEN
: Beginning at 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 20 and ending at 5:30 a.m. on Friday, November 21

WHY
: The closure will allow crews to install a permanent traffic signal pole to replace an existing temporary pole. The temporary pole allowed crews the room to construct a large vault housed under the westbound lane of SE Powell Boulevard. The vault now houses complex piping connected to the city’s new 25‐million gallon underground reservoir atop Kelly Butte.

WHAT TRAVELERS NEED TO KNOW:

  • There will be NO lane closures.
  • Motorists and bicyclists are asked to use caution in this area.
  • Flaggers will direct both east- and west-bound lanes of traffic safely around the work site.
  • To avoid traffic delays, motorists should use alternate routes.