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Portland Water Bureau

From forest to faucet, we deliver the best drinking water in the world.

GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

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Annual ORWARN Conference Focuses on Practical Preparedness

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

In late February 2016, more than 70 utility members attended a two-day conference in Newport, Oregon.

Sponsored by the Oregon Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (ORWARN), the conference brought together national, regional, state, and local experts to converse about steps employees can take - both at home and on the job - to prepare for a major emergency. The conference also focused on preparing utility members to participate in the multistate Cascadia Rising Exercise in June 2016.

More than 20 speakers were on hand to discuss all aspects of resilience for both people and utilities. Two of those speakers hailed from the Portland Water Bureau: Principal Engineer Mary Ellen Collentine and Operations Director Chris Wanner. Chris Wanner was the conference organizer and was instrumental in putting the technical program together, which received rave reviews from the attendees.

The Water Bureau is a strong supporter of attending trainings and building partnerships that help to transcend jurisdictional boundaries. We understand   that effective coordination is essential in preserving lives and property before, during, and after emergency incidents.

Mary Ellen and Chris, both current ORWARN board members, focused on how emergencies can transcend jurisdictional boundaries and why effective coordination is essential in preserving lives and property. During their presentations, they explained how the ORWARN network of member utilities can help to facilitate rapid, short-term deployment of emergency services, in the form of personnel, equipment and materials, required to restore critical operations to utilities that have sustained damages from natural or man-made events.

“WARNs became established to provide rapid deployment of mutual aid to a utility to help restore critical operations,” notes Mary Ellen. “Water and wastewater staff are certified by their states to operate their utility and only similarly skilled staff from other utilities have the training and experience to step in to help. This is why it is so important to participate in mutual aid.”

The last day of the conference included a table top exercise sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 

TRAFFIC ADVISORY 04/22/16: Preparation for Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project Begins Spring 2016, Impacts to Travel

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Official Traffic Advisory

In order to comply with federal and state mandates and ensure a healthy, resilient, and secure water system, the Portland Water Bureau and Oregon general contractor Hoffman Construction Company are moving forward with an eight-year capital improvement project to update the Washington Park reservoir site at 2403 SW Jefferson Street.

Beginning late April 2016 and lasting for two to three weeks, the Portland Water Bureau and our contractor will begin preparing the project site by working with the City of Portland’s arborist to remove vegetation and trees below lower Reservoir 4 near the pump station facilities and adjacent to SW Jefferson Street. All work will occur within the project site.

Selective tree pruning and inspection will also occur within the project site, around Reservoir 3 and 4, and along SW Sacajawea Boulevard, SW Lewis Clark Way, and SW Madison Court. Pruning and inspection will occur intermittently Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Travelers and park users are asked to exercise caution and drive slowly around tree pruning work areas.

Park users are encouraged to travel to and move safely around the park and its attractions by using the bus and light rail, walking, biking and skating, and taking the free park shuttle. Visit http://TriMet.org and www.ExploreWashingtonPark.org for transit options.

The project entails building a new, seismically reinforced below ground reservoir. The reservoir will not only maintain the historic drinking water function provided by the original reservoirs, but will be engineered to withstand ongoing landslide encroachment and potentially catastrophic effects of a major earthquake and will feature a reflecting pool on top in the same general footprint as the historical Reservoir 3. Reservoir 4 will be disconnected from the public drinking water system, and a lowland habitat area/bioswale and a reflecting pool will be constructed in the basin.

CONTACT US
For additional project information and updates, or to contact us with questions or concerns:

Reach us by Phone: 503-823-7030
Write us an E-mailLindsay.Wochnick@portlandoregon.gov  
Visit us Online: www.PortlandOregon.gov/Water/WPReservoirs

Happy Earth Day!

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

Quarter Mile Pool, Upper Bull Run River

Portlanders have good reasons to celebrate!

Over the past ten years, our city’s population has grown by 18 percent—but the city’s total water use has decreased by 13 percent. Here are some ways you can be part of the trend:

Here are some ways the Portland Water Bureau works year-round to take care of natural resources:

  • We deliver most of the region's drinking water using a free and very efficient resource: gravity. When engineers designed Portland’s early water system in the 1890s, they designed pipelines to bring the water from Bull Run to Portland entirely by gravity.
  • As the water system delivers drinking water, it also produces clean energy. The Bull Run Dams and in-pipe turbines make use of the water moving through them, reducing the bureau’s net carbon footprint.
  • Because Portland's system relies on the Bull Run River for most of its water, there have been impacts to the fish populations native to the area. Through the Bull Run Water Supply Habitat Conservation Plan, the bureau works to protect fish species listed under the Endangered Species Act—Chinook and coho salmon, as well as steelhead trout—in the Bull Run and in the Sandy River Basin beyond.

Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project: April 2016 Update

By Lindsay Wochnick 0 Comments | Add a Comment

In order to comply with federal and state mandates and ensure a healthy, resilient, and secure water system, the Portland Water Bureau and Oregon general contractor Hoffman Construction Company are moving forward with an eight-year capital improvement project to update the Washington Park reservoir site at 2403 SW Jefferson Street.

Currently, Washington Park’s open Reservoirs 3 (upper) and 4 (lower) occupy the site along with two gate houses, a weir building, three pump houses, a generator house, and associated underground piping. The reservoirs are part of an ingenious gravity‐fed drinking water system constructed more than 120 years ago in 1893 and 1894, respectively.

STRENGTHENING OUR WATER SYSTEM

  
Renderings

The project entails building a new, seismically reinforced below ground reservoir. The reservoir will not only maintain the historic drinking water function provided by the original reservoirs, but will be engineered to withstand ongoing landslide encroachment and potentially catastrophic effects of a major earthquake and will feature a reflecting pool on top in the same general footprint as the historical Reservoir 3.

  
Renderings

Reservoir 4 will be disconnected from the public drinking water system, and a lowland habitat area/bioswale and a reflecting pool will be constructed in the basin.

When complete and online, the new underground reservoir will supply water to Portland’s west side, including all downtown businesses and residents, the Oregon Zoo, more than 60 parks, six hospitals, and 20 Portland public schools.

PROJECT DRIVERS
Four major challenges are driving this project: aging facilities, seismic vulnerability, an ancient landslide, and the Long-Term Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2).

  1. Aging Facilities: Reservoirs are typically designed for 100 years of service. The two Washington Park reservoirs are more than 120 years old. Condition assessments performed at the Washington Park Reservoir site in 1997 and 2001 confirmed the reservoirs and structures were nearing the end of their useful service life.
  2. Seismic Vulnerability: The original facilities were designed and constructed prior to current seismic standards. They do not meet structural requirements for current anticipated seismic activity and, therefore, are vulnerable to severe damage or failure during a significant seismic event. Failure of these reservoirs and structures could be catastrophic, resulting in the loss of drinking water to the west side of Portland.
  3. Landslide: Washington Park’s ancient landslide at the reservoir site has been continuously damaging both reservoirs since original construction in the late 1800’s.
  4. Long-Term Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2): The 2006 federal regulation requires the City of Portland to protect its stored drinking water against contamination as part of the water quality requirements for safe drinking water. To address this requirement, the City is constructing alternative buried storage, allowing the uncovered reservoirs to be taken off‐line.

The project is part of the Water Bureau’s Capital Improvement Program and funded by revenue bond proceeds paid back with utility ratepayers’ fund. 

WHY NOW?
The project is happening now in order to meet four key deadlines identified in the compliance schedule approved by the federal Environmental Protection Agency and enforced by the Oregon Health Authority: 

  • March 30, 2016: Complete design
  • July 1, 2016: Begin construction
  • December 31, 2019: Complete Reservoir 3 construction
  • December 31, 2020: Disconnect Reservoir 4 from the city’s water system

AT-A-GLANCE: APRIL - AUGUST 2016

TASK LOCATION 2016
APR MAY JUN JUL AUG
Tree Pruning / Inspection Within project site, around the reservoirs, along SW Sacajawea Blvd, SW Lewis Clark Way, & SW Madison Ct          
Miscellaneous Site Work Inside Portland Water Bureau fencing          
Construction Fence Installation Project site          
Placement of Mobile Field Offices Project site, below Reservoir 4          
Vegetation / Tree Removal Around the reservoirs, by SW Sacajawea and Sherwood Blvds           
Erosion Control Project site          
Remove Steel Grillage, Fencing Project site          
Remove Weir Building East of Reservoir 3          

The project will span eight years; the first two years will trigger the most significant impacts to traffic, transportation, and parking in the park.

Park users are encouraged to travel to and move safely around the park and its attractions by using the bus and light rail, walking, biking and skating, and taking the free park shuttle. Visit http://TriMet.org and www.ExploreWashingtonPark.org  for transit options.

Following is a description of upcoming project work and impacts spanning now until August 2016.

April – May 2016
Vegetation and trees will be removed below Reservoir 4 near the pump station facilities and adjacent to SW Jefferson Street. All work will occur within the project site. Selective tree pruning and inspection will also occur within the project site, around the reservoirs, and along SW Sacajawea Boulevard, SW Lewis Clark Way, and SW Madison Court.

  • Traffic Slowing: Travelers are encouraged to exercise caution and drive slowly around tree pruning work areas on SW Sacajawea Boulevard, SW Lewis Clark Way, and SW Madison Court. Pruning will occur intermittently Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May - August 2016
Early site preparation work will occur, including construction fence installation, placement of mobile field offices, tree/vegetation clearing, and erosion control. 

  • Traffic Delays: Travelers may experience intermittent traffic flow delays up to 20 minutes on SW Sacajawea and SW Sherwood Boulevards due to pre-construction maintenance and removal of vegetation and trees in and around the project site.
  • Parking: All parking will remain open on SW Lewis Clark Way and SW Sacajawea and SW Sherwood Boulevards.
  • Park Facilities: All park facilities will remain open.
  • TriMet Bus Service: TriMet Bus Line 63 may have minor delays. Stop ID 6177 at SW Sacajawea/ Sherwood may be intermittently affected depending on pre-construction activity. Check TriMet.org for real time updates.

KEEPING YOU UP-TO-DATE
To contact us with questions or concerns or to change your preferences on how to receive project updates:

Show Your Support for National Work Zone Awareness Week

By Lindsay Wochnick Add a Comment

With dry summer weather just ahead, travelers in Portland will likely see more construction work that impacts city streets. A lot of this work is to upgrade water mains and sewer pipes and repair road pavement. With this necessary work comes an increase in traffic delays. 

National studies indicate that driver distraction is the biggest factor in work zone collisions along with excessive vehicle speed.  And 40 percent of work zone collisions occur in the transition area just prior to the work zone.

The Portland Water Bureau recommends the following safety tips for motorists and bicyclists to keep in mind when observing bright orange signs, cones, barricades, utility workers, and traffic flaggers: 

  • Use an alternate route. When you can, avoid streets with posted work zones.
  • Expect delays.  Plan to leave early so you can drive safely through the work zone and avoid having to rush.
  • Be alert. Pay attention to the driving task and watch the cars ahead of you.
  • Obey all speed and warning signs. They are there for your safety and will help prevent a collision.  
  • Do not tailgate.  Double the following distance.
  • Carefully move over.  When possible give workers more room between them and your vehicle, but do not veer into on-coming traffic lane.
  • Watch for vehicle access. Be aware that temporary construction may impact either side of the road, or adjacent streets.
  • Stay clear of construction vehicles.  Heavy vehicles travel in and out of the work areas and can make sudden moves. 

Please help keep you, other drivers, and our workers protected by slowing down for work zone safety.