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Portland Water Bureau Welcomes Commissioner Nick Fish

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Commissioner Nick FishEarlier this week, City of Portland Mayor Charlie Hales assigned Commissioner Nick Fish to be the new Commissioner-in-Charge of the Portland Water Bureau. Along with the Portland Water Bureau, Commissioner Fish will also be in charge of the Bureau of Environmental Services and serve as a Council liaison to Elders in Action, Venture Portland and the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Previously, Commissioner Fish served as Commissioner in Charge of the Portland Housing Bureau and Portland Parks & Recreation. In 2008, Commissioner Fish was elected to the Portland City Council in a special election and re-elected to a four year term in 2010. 

The Portland Water Bureau welcomes Nick Fish as our newest Commissioner.  To learn more about Commissioner Fish, please visit http://www.portlandonline.com/fish/.

Lindsay Wochnick
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1

PHIL DYE

June 20, 2013 at 11:23 AM

I HAVE AN IDEA FOR THE WATER RESERVOIRS PROBLEM. I WOULD SUGGEST USING LARGE RUBBER BLADDERS ( BAGS ), THEY COULD BE LAID RIGHT IN THE CEMENT PONDS THAT EXIST, THEY WOULD COVER THE WATER AND WOULD PROBABLY COST LESS THAN THE PLANS I'VE HEARD OFF. I HAVE SEEN THIS TYPE OF THING USED TO TRANSPORT LIQUIDS ON FLAT BED TRUCKS, WHAT I'M PROPOSING WOULD BE MUCH LARGER. THEY CAN ALSO BE FITTED WITH CONNECTIONS ON THE ENDS TO CONNECT WITH THE EXISTING PLUMBING SYSTEM. THANKS.

2

Lindsay Wochnick

June 20, 2013 at 1:03 PM

Thank you for your idea Phil Dye.

Tens of millions of gallons of water flow through the reservoirs. One 50 million gallon reservoir may turnover four times on a hot summer day. Have you considered that the massive rubber bladders would be expensive and difficult to manufacture? And for a single city's use, you're likely not to have a company willing to make them once every 10 to 15 years. And the stress on the seams to contain that much volume.

In addition, they would be difficult to clean as sediments would be trapped inside. Something else, as mentioned, each bladder would have to be replaced every 10-15 years or soon as the rubber would soften and deteriorate. And, if the bladder should burst, hundreds of homes would be flooded without warning; people's lives would be put at risk. This is why a certain high strength concrete and rebar go into making water reservoirs.

3

Aaron 911 Restoration Long Island

June 29, 2013 at 9:35 PM

Welcome, Mr. Fish. We hope that your new task as a commissioner will bear fruits of progress and lead to an adept on any <a href="http://www.911restorationlongisland.com">water disaster response</a>.

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Spam Prevention In the Pacific Northwest, what state is Portland in?