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Planning and Sustainability

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1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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PSC Recommends Adoption of the N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Plans

N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Plans move on to City Council

Planning and Sustainability Commission Session

After holding a public hearing and work session on the project, the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) voted to recommend that the City Council adopt the N/NE Quadrant Plan, a long-range plan for the Lower Albina and Lloyd Districts of the Central City, with minor amendments. The I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plan, a concept plan for improvements to the freeway and local street system in the interchange area, was recommended for adoption with no changes. The Recommended Draft N/NE Quadrant Plan will be available the week of October 8.

PSC meeting materials are available at the following links:

September 11 Hearing: http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer/rec/5100237/

September 25 Work Session: http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer/rec/5172055/

Full-length videos of PSC meetings are shown on cable Channel 30. Their regular re-airing schedule is every Friday at 3pm, the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30pm and the 1st and 3rd Sundays at 7:00am.

City Council Hearing

The N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Plans are headed to City Council for a public hearing on Thursday, October 25 at 2 p.m. You can share your views with City Council in several ways:

Testify in person
Public Hearing - Thursday, October 25 at 2 p.m.
Council Chambers (City Hall, 2nd Floor)
1221 SW Fourth Avenue
Portland, OR 97204

Submit written testimony
Attn: Council Clerk
1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Room 140
Portland,OR 97204

You can also provide comments by FAX to 503-823-4571 or email to Karla.Moore-Love@portlandoregon.gov. Written testimony must be received by the time of the hearing and must include your name and address. 

My Portland Plan: Portland is Growing More Diverse

The makeup of Portland's population has been changing over the past 30 years.

Portland is often characterized as a “white” city, and it’s true. The largest segment of the city’s population is white. But since 1980, the demographic makeup of the city has increasingly become more diverse. In 1980, the white population was more than 80 percent of the city’s total population; by 2010 it was a little over 70 percent of the population.

Graph showing Portland's population growth for different races since 1980 

Over the last 30 years, Portland’s population has grown from roughly 370,000 to 584,000. And with that growth has come diversity, which is not too different from the national trend.

The most notable increases have occurred among Hispanics and Asians. In 1980 they each made up less than 3 percent of the population. In 2010, Hispanics were more than 10 percent of the population — an eight-fold increase overall — and Asians 7 percent, nearly a four-fold increase.

Increases in the Black population over the last 30 years have been much less dramatic. While they have grown in absolute numbers, the increase has been comparably small; just under 8,000 people in 30 years. Blacks in 2010 make up 6 percent of the population, down from 7.1 percent in 1980.

The Native American and Alaskan Native population and Other race groups have also contributed to Portland’s growing diversity. Changes in reporting (“some other race” was introduced in 2000) contributed to the large increase between 1990 and 2000. Combined, the NA-AN and Other race groups account for about 5 percent of the city’s population in 2010. But the proportions may be actually slightly higher. According to members of the Native American communities, Native Americans may be undercounted in the Census. According to “The Native American Community” profile that is part of the Communities of Color reports, a community-verified population count — explorations into the actual numbers — suggests the community may be undercounted by nearly 50 percent in Multnomah County.

In absolute numbers, the white population has had the largest amount of growth, an increase of over 100,000. But their proportion of total population has decreased as all other groups have grown proportionally.

So Portland is arguably becoming a more diverse city. While still not as diverse as other places in the country, the city is on a trajectory to become much more culturally, racially and ethnically diverse. It just may take some time —perhaps a generation or two.

PSC News: September 25, 2012 meeting recap and documents

West Hayden Island - briefing; Central City 2035 - work session & recommendation; N/NE Quadrant Plan - work session & recommendation

Agenda:

  • West Hayden Island - Briefing
  • Central City 2035 - Work Session & Recommendation
  • N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Plans - Work Session & Recommendation

Meeting files:

 An archive of meeting minutes, documents and audio recordings of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer/search/rec?sm_clastext=Planning%20and%20Sustainability%20Commission&sort1=rs_dateCreated&count&rows=50.

CC2035 Concept Plan Endorsed by Planning and Sustainability Commission

The Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission recommended approval of the Central City 2035 Concept Plan on 9/25/12

On Sept. 25, 2012 Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission unanimously recommended approval of the Central City 2035 Concept Plan and forwarded their recommendation to the City Council. The recommendations includes some minor amendments to the CC2035 Concept Plan, including one policy addition, a few text changes, and some limited adjustments to the urban design maps and diagrams.

You can review online all the documents which were presented to the Planning and Sustainability Commission on Sept. 11 and on Sept. 25. The Central City 2035 Concept Plan will be presented to the City Council on Oct. 24, 2012. Information about the City Council and how to testify can be found online here: http://www.portlandonline.com/auditor/index.cfm?c=27481.

For more information about the CC2035 plan, background materials, updates, and upcoming events, visit www.portlandonline.com/bps/cc2035. For questions or comments about the CC2035 Concept Plan, please contact Troy Doss at (503) 823-5857 or by email at troy.doss@portlandoregon.gov.

Recommended Draft N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plans Go Before City Council

N/NE Quadrant Project Update

Last month, after holding a public hearing and work session, the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission voted to recommend that the City Council adopt the N/NE Quadrant Plan, a long-range plan for the Lower Albina and Lloyd Districts of the Central City, and the I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plan, a concept plan for freeway and local street system improvements in the vicinity of the Broadway/Weidler interchange. The public is invited to testify about the plans at an upcoming City Council hearing.

Public Hearing - Testimony Welcome

N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway-Weidler Plans
Portland City Council
October 25, 2012 2 p.m.
Council Chambers (City Hall, 2nd Floor)
1221 SW Fourth Avenue

Testimony Instructions
You can share your views with City Council in several ways:

Testify in person at the hearing (see details above)

Submit written testimony
Attn: Council Clerk
1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Room 140
Portland,OR97204

FAX or Email comments to 503-823-4571 or Karla.Moore-Love@portlandoregon.gov. Written testimony must be received by the time of the hearing and must include your name and address.

Download Council Documents

Interactive Map

View the map to see how your property could be affected by proposed changes to zoning and maximum building height regulations.

More About the Draft Plans

N/NE Quadrant Plan
The N/NE Quadrant Plan is a land use, urban design and local transportation plan that will help direct and manage growth for theLloydDistrict andLower Albina over the next 25 years. The plan focuses on preserving the industrial and employment character of Lower Albina and concentrating high-density development in theLloydDistrict, with a focus on new residential development and providing amenities needed for a livable and vibrant community. Providing sensitive transitions to historic neighborhoods and protecting the remaining cultural resources in the area is also a key theme of the plan.

I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plan
The I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plan contains a planning-level concept for improvements that address longstanding safety and operations issues on and around Interstate 5 and the Broadway/Weidler interchange. The recommended improvements would add auxiliary lanes and full-width shoulders (within existing right-of-way) to reduce dangerous traffic weaves and allow disabled vehicles to move out of traffic lanes, reducing crashes by an estimated 30 to 50 percent. The freeway improvements also provide an opportunity to improve the urban environment and conditions for pedestrian and bicycle travel in the interchange area. The plan proposes to rebuild overpasses with lids over the freeway that could be used for development or open space, the addition of new connections over the freeway and providing additional and safer pedestrian and bicycle facilities in the area. The I-5 Broadway/Weidler Facility Plan is scheduled to be presented to the Oregon Transportation Commission in December.