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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

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From BPS Director Susan Anderson: Toward a more prosperous, healthy, resilient and equitable community

Our work at BPS is trending with others around the globe.

Reflecting on what’s happened around the world this past year — two themes related to our work stand out for me.

1st - Climate change is out front on the world stage. From John Kerry to Ban Ki-moon to Pope Francis, world leaders are calling for action to reduce carbon emissions and prepare for climate change.

2nd - This is “the year the people stood up.” (The Guardian) From Eastern Europe to the Middle East, Africa and here in America, people stood up for freedom, basic human rights, economic parity and racial equity.

Climate change and equity, along with prosperity and healthy neighborhoods, are at the core of our mission here at BPS. These issues are global in nature, but we have the tools to take action and make a difference locally. Hundreds of volunteers, partners and expert advisors help us craft long-range plans, regulatory codes and market-based tools, and provide information and hands-on technical assistance to advance our citywide goals. Here are some BPS highlights from 2014:

From Trash to Treasure

Portland’s combined recycling and composting rate is 70 percent!  And, it continues to be one of the highest in the nation. Eight out of ten Portland homes — more than 110,000 in all — are creating rich compost for healthier farms and gardens by adding food scraps to their green composting roll carts. Portlanders also have reduced garbage going to landfill by 36 percent since the food scrap collection program started three years ago. Thanks to the dedication of our Solid Waste and Recycling Team and their outstanding customer service, Portlanders rate their curbside compost, recycling and garbage service more highly than almost any other City service.                        

But we couldn’t do all this without you! Our Master Recycler Program is a corps of more than 1,300 volunteers, who help Portland and other jurisdictions in the region promote waste prevention, toxics reduction, recycling and composting.

Innovative Approaches

Our Sustainable Outreach and Events Team continues to come up with great ideas to help more Portlanders save money and energy. Programs like Be Cart Smart, Your Sustainable City and Resourceful PDX reached tens of thousands of residents at community events all over the city.

This was another successful year of “takin’ it to the streets,” with a total of 57 neighborhood cleanup events. Our outreach team worked with community partners, nonprofits and neighborhood associations to provide community members a place to recycle, reuse and turn their trash into treasure with onsite swapping and sharing.

Sustainability at Work had another great year of bringing free assessments, trainings, presentations, tools and resources to more than 1,000 local businesses. And 40 more businesses were certified and recognized for their sustainability achievements.

BPS piloted new approaches to bringing clean energy to the community with Solar Forward. This new effort offers Portlanders a way to support the development of solar energy systems on public buildings like community centers, schools and libraries.

Be Prepared

Our newly adopted Climate Change Preparation Strategy includes policies and actions that support individuals and families who are most vulnerable to projected impacts, particularly heat, poor air quality and flooding. The strategy is the product of extensive research and analysis by BPS’ Research and Policy Team and close coordination with our sister agencies across the city and Multnomah County.

The team is now preparing for the release of the 2015 Climate Action Plan, which includes a goal to reduce carbon emissions by 40 percent by 2035. The plan will showcase new research and infuse equity throughout the actions and policies. This was done with the assistance of a Technical Advisory Committee comprised of climate experts, environmental justice advocates and a diversity of community members.

This was the first of our projects and programs to take a formal, close look at the equity impacts of our goals and action items. We are still on a learning curve. Applying an equity lens to future climate impacts required some new levels of demographic modeling and mapping. It helped us to envision the nexus of different populations by race, income and age. The result is a strategy that more closely considers Portland’s most vulnerable populations.

Big Picture Plans

In addition to the Climate Action Plan, we have been continuing our effort to update the City’s 1980 Comprehensive Plan. The new 2015 Comprehensive Plan draft is now with the Planning and Sustainability Commission for review and deliberation. The new plan will guide the city’s growth and development over the next 20 years, while creating complete neighborhoods and sustainable communities so that more people have access to jobs, transit, affordable housing, parks, schools, libraries, restaurants, coffee and, of course, beer.

More Innovation

Thanks to our district liaisons, we have strong ties to the community both within the neighborhood associations and among other community groups. We built on those relationships with a new online Map App from the GIS Team, which had more than 35,000 visits since its launch over the summer. This interactive tool lets residents zoom into their neighborhoods to understand any proposed land use changes and then make and view other people’s comments online.

As the Comprehensive Plan moves forward into implementation, we’ll rely on our code writers to translate the land use map into regulations. Early implementation projects for the Comprehensive Plan include the Mixed Use Zones and Campus Institutions projects.

PlaceMaking

We continue to champion big ideas to create great places throughout Portland. Much of our work focuses on creating healthy connected neighborhoods in key Centers and Corridors.  

We are partnering with Metro and TriMet to create an even better transit and civic corridor along the Powell-Division alignment, especially for people living in East Portland. And we’re developing a Scenic Resources Inventory to ensure we preserve the vistas that we cherish.  

While we work at the citywide level on the 2035 Comprehensive Plan, we’re also updating a long-range plan to guide Portland’s Central City through 2035 with a focus on making it a center of innovation and exchange. Quadrant-specific plans provide distinct strategies that balance the demands for new jobs, housing, transportation and vibrant walkable neighborhoods from Goose Hollow to China Town to the Central Eastside and the Lloyd District.

The Central City Team will soon take the West Quadrant Plan to City Council for adoption. On the other side of the river, the Southeast Quadrant Pan is underway, with guidance from business and neighborhood stakeholders, and the assistance of the Urban Land Institute’s 2014 Daniel Rose Fellowship.

Recognition

Portland received the C40 Climate Leadership Sustainable Communities Award and President Obama designated Portland a “Climate Action Champion.” Both of these awards position us to establish national and international partnerships to accelerate the work ahead. The Energy Foundation provided extensive resources to help Chinese cities learn from Portland and allowed staff to share technical expertise related to Portland’s Climate Action Plan. In addition, Denmark sponsored two staff as visiting scholars at Aalborg University, and the Smart Cities Expo World Congress in Barcelona sponsored our technical GIS staff to share the innovative Map App with cities from around the world.

What’s next?

2015 promises to be a turning point. The big vision plans will be done: Climate Action Plan, Comprehensive Plan and Central City 2035. Now we tackle the details. For example, we'll develop new specific code changes for mixed use, multi- and single-dwelling zones as well as other improvements, including  changes to the code to reflect the new Central City 2035 plan. We're proposing an Energy Performance Score for larger commercial buildings. And we'll enhance recycling for renters, and continue to help thousands of residents and businesses live, work and play more sustainably. 

As we launch into a busy new year, we join millions of people from around the world who are working hard to create local solutions for a more prosperous, equitable and sustainable world.

Sincerely,

Susan Anderson

Director

City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

Learn about proposed City of Portland Energy Performance Reporting Policy for commercial buildings

Proposed policy would help building operators track energy use and identify options to improve efficiency and save money

This spring, Portland City Council will consider a new policy that would require owners of commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to track their building’s energy use and report it on an annual basis. The proposed policy would cover nearly 80 percent of the commercial square footage, affecting approximately 1,000 buildings — less than 20 percent of Portland’s commercial buildings.

Renee Loveland, sustainability manager at Gerding Edlen, told the Portland Tribune that “the policy is a great step in the right direction.” Other coverage of the policy proposal includes a story from The Oregonian  and the Portland Business Journal .

What’s this about?

The proposed Energy Performance Reporting Policy would require commercial buildings to track energy performance with a free online tool called ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and report energy use information to the City of Portland on an annual basis. There are nearly 5,000 commercial buildings in Portland and fewer than 100 claim ENERGY STAR certification. 

Why is the City proposing this policy?

  • The energy used to power buildings is the largest source of carbon pollution in Portland.
  • Similar to a MPG rating for a new car, the energy performance policy would allow potential tenants and owners to have access to important information about building energy performance.
  • Commercial energy reporting policies in 10 other U.S. cities have proven to motivate investment in efficiency improvements that save money and reduce carbon emissions.

“The proposed policy will build awareness in the commercial building sector about energy performance,” said Bureau of Planning and Sustainability Director Susan Anderson. “Energy-efficient buildings are a win for the building owner, the tenant and for Portland’s carbon reduction goals.”

The proposed policy covers offices, retail spaces, grocery stores, hotels, health care and higher education buildings. It does not include residential properties, nursing homes, places of worship, parking structures, K-12 schools, industrial facilities or warehouses.

Two events in early January offered businesses affected by the proposal a chance to ask questions, provide feedback and to understand next steps. Staff from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will continue to work with stakeholders from the real estate and development community to refine the policy before consideration by Portland City Council in spring, 2015.

When would the proposed policy go into effect?

  • Commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet would be required to begin reporting in 2016.
  • Commercial buildings between 20,000 and 50,000 square feet would begin reporting in 2017.

 

Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/energyreporting to learn more, provide feedback and sign up for policy updates.

Fix-It Fair deepens community connections

Next Fix-It Fair happens this Saturday at David Douglas High School

The City of Portland is hosting its 28th annual Fix-It Fair season, creating a rich and inclusive community event where Portlanders from various backgrounds can learn new ways to save money, improve their homes and live healthier lives. At the recent January Fix-It Fair, more than 60 community partners provided workshops and resources for attendees who spoke more than five languages.

But making connections with all the communities who enjoy attending the Fix-It Fair event leverages the network of many community partners.

For example, Irene Konev, co-chair of the Slavic Advisory Council to the Chief of Police’s Office, connected BPS to student interpreters from Portland State University’s Russian Flagship Program who were looking for ways to apply their skills and serve community.

Through Portland Public Schools, we connected with Russian-speaking parents interested in attending the fair and in need of interpretation services. The student interpreters helped one parent understand how to address a mold situation at home from the Multnomah County Environmental Health exhibit.

For the upcoming Fix-It Fair this weekend, we offer a Spanish-language workshop track and we spread the word via a partnership with KUNP – Univisión Portland. Watch our commercial!

FIFNot familiar with the Fix-It Fair? It’s a free event where you can learn simple and effective ways to save money at home and stay healthy this winter and beyond. Featuring exhibits from numerous community partners, FIF includes an extensive schedule of workshops held throughout the day. Volunteers from a variety of community organizations share expertise about water and energy savings, personal health, food and nutrition, community resources, recycling, yard care and more!

Details about this Saturday's Fix-It Fair

Special workshops taught in Spanish are offered at the David Douglas Fair this weekend. Free professional childcare and lunch are also provided.

Saturday, February 21, 2015, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. ¡Clases en español!

David Douglas High School
1001 SE 135th Ave​

To find out more information about scheduled workshops, visit http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/fif (en español: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/fif/esp) or like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/FixItFairPDX.

To receive information and reminders about upcoming fairs, email fixitfair@portlandoregon.gov.

The Fix-It Fairs are presented by the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability with support from the following sponsors: Energy Trust of Oregon, Pacific Power, Portland Water Bureau and KUNP Univision.

A special thank you goes to those City of Portland bureaus and offices that participate in the fairs:​ ​Auditor's Independent Police Review, Bureau of Development Services, Bureau of Environmental Services, Bureau of Transportation, Office of the Ombudsman, Portland Housing Bureau, Portland Parks and Recreation and Water Bureau.

The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is committed to providing equal access. If you need special accommodation, interpretation or translation, please call 503-823-4309, the TTY at 503-823-6868 or the Oregon Relay Service at 1-800-735-2900.

Local carbon emissions down 35 percent per person. City and County release draft 2015 Climate Action Plan proposing next steps.

Community comments welcome on draft plan for City of Portland and Multnomah County to cut carbon 80 percent by 2050. Public comment period open through April 10, 2015.

CAP Cover Image

News from the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

CONTACTS
Julia Thompson  |  503-823-0229  |  Julia.Thompson@portlandoregon.gov
Christine Llobregat  |  503-823-7007  |  Christine.Llobregat@portlandoregon.gov


Portland, ORE. — Today the City of Portland and Multnomah County released the draft 2015 Climate Action Plan for public comment. The draft plan provides a roadmap for the community to achieve an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with an interim goal of a 40 percent reduction by 2030.

In 1993, Portland was the first city in the United States to create a local action plan for cutting carbon. The 2015 draft plan builds on Portland’s 20+ year legacy of climate action with ambitious new policies, fresh research on consumption choices and engagement with community leaders serving low-income households and communities of color to help ensure that all Portlanders benefit from the City and County’s climate action efforts.

“I have spoken to city leaders around the world who are amazed that Portland has had a Climate Action Plan since 2009,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. “Many other cities are just now contemplating such a plan. As we look at the 2015 draft, two things come to mind: How incredibly far we’ve come. And how much more work is ahead of us.”

“Climate change is our generation’s greatest environmental challenge,” said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. “The Climate Action Plan charts a course for us to continue working toward reducing emissions. But it also helps us prepare for the inevitable impacts of climate change, especially the vulnerable members of our community who will suffer the most. I am committed to doing what we can now to achieve a low carbon future and be prepared for the impacts of hotter, drier summers and warmer winters.”

Attend an open house event in March

The City of Portland and Multnomah County welcome feedback from the community through Apr. 10, 2015. Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/climate to read the draft 2015 Climate Action Plan and complete the online comment form.

Open houses are scheduled for:

  • Thursday, March 19, 2015, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Velo Cult Bike Shop, 1969 NE 42nd Ave., Portland, OR 97213
  • Tuesday, March 24, 2015, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at June Key Delta Community Center, 5940 North Albina St., Portland, OR 97217

Following community input and revisions, the draft plan will be considered for adoption by the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission, Multnomah County Board of Commissioners and the Portland City Council.

As global leaders grapple with the concerns and opportunities the changing climate presents, Portland has become an international destination for planners and decision-makers seeking proven strategies for climate action. Since 2010, more than 160 delegations from around the world have come to Portland to speak with business and government leaders to understand how Portland has lowered emissions while welcoming growth and creating a more livable community. Portland and Multnomah County now have 12,000 clean tech jobs, an increase of 25 percent in the last 15 years.

Highlights of the draft Climate Action Plan

  • This summer TriMet will open Tilikum Crossing: Bridge of the People, the largest bridge in the United States to carry people on transit, bikes and on foot, but no cars. To accommodate the potential for higher river levels from climate change, the height of the bridge above the water was increased. The draft plan calls for continued investments that expand active transportation options throughout Portland and ensure those infrastructure investments are resilient to the impacts of climate change. 
  • Over the last five years, Portland residents have installed more than 2,000 solar systems and more than 2,000 homeowners have insulated their houses. The draft plan calls for doubling solar installations through efforts like community solar and continuing to weatherize homes at a faster rate than ever.
  • This spring the Portland City Council will consider an energy tracking and reporting policy for large commercial buildings. If adopted, the City will work with building owners and managers to access resources to improve the energy performance of Portland’s largest 1,000 commercial buildings.
  • Recent changes to garbage and composting service have led to a 37 percent reduction in garbage headed to the landfill. Residential bills are down two years in a row, while Portland’s recycling rate has reached 70 percent, one of the highest in the nation. The draft plan focuses on reaching renters and large multifamily communities to get those numbers even higher.
  • The draft plan also proposes to broaden the City’s work on waste to look at “upstream” opportunities to make more efficient use of existing goods, vehicles and buildings, such as car-sharing and short-term rentals. Other new business models are emerging to make it easier for people to rent, borrow, repair, and reuse everyday goods.

The 2015 Climate Action Plan includes new areas of focus

Advancing equity: Portland is changing. More than half of the students in Portland Public Schools, for example, are people of color. Low-income communities and people of color in Multnomah County are likely to experience the impacts of climate change more acutely, including increased air pollution and heat waves.

At the same time, these communities historically have not had the same access to the kinds of services and infrastructure that make low-carbon choices easier and affordable, such as frequent transit service and adequate sidewalks in East Portland or energy efficiency programs that benefit renters. From transportation investments and economic opportunities to tree plantings and policy engagement, the 2015 draft plan prioritizes actions that reduce disparities and ensure that under-served and under-represented communities share in the benefits of climate action work.

“Certain populations, including low-income households, communities of color, linguistically isolated households, renters and older adults may be less able to prepare for and recover from impacts from climate change,” said Claudia Arana Colen, health equity coordinator, Upstream Public Health. “I am pleased to see the needs of vulnerable populations prioritized, and expect Portland and Multnomah County to deliver on their commitments to these communities as they implement this plan.”

Exploring consumption: For the first time, the Climate Action Plan includes a consumption-based inventory, tallying carbon emissions associated with all of the goods and services that are produced elsewhere and consumed in Multnomah County. This inventory considers carbon emissions from the full lifecycle of goods and services, including production, transportation, wholesale and retail, use and disposal. Global carbon emissions as a result of local consumer demand are larger than the volume of emissions produced locally.

The addition of the consumption-based inventory offers insight into a wider range of opportunities to reduce carbon. Residents, for example, can shift purchases toward goods that are durable and repairable. Businesses have opportunities throughout their supply chains to choose lower-carbon options, and new business models like car-sharing are emerging to make it easier to borrow, repair and reuse everyday goods.

How to comment

  1. Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/climate for more information about the new plan, and to read specific chapters or download the full draft plan.
  2. Comments on the draft 2015 City of Portland and Multnomah County Climate Action Plan are due by April 10, 2015.
  3. Share your feedback on the draft plan using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by:
Email to: climate@portlandoregon.gov

Postal mail to:

RE: 2015 Climate Action Plan
City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Avenue, #7100
Portland, OR 97201

Additional statements from City of Portland and Multnomah County

“Total carbon emissions in the U.S. are up 7 percent since 1990. Here, in Portland and Multnomah County, we’ve cut total emissions by 14 percent, with 30 percent more people and over 75,000 more jobs. Clearly we are headed in a different direction," said Susan Anderson, director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. “The investments that have helped us cut energy use and reduce carbon emissions are the same things that make people want to live here: Creating walkable neighborhoods with shopping, restaurants and parks; investing in transit and bike facilities; and making our homes and buildings more efficient and comfortable.”

“Climate change is a threat to the health and wellbeing of our entire community, but will fall hardest on those most vulnerable to climate change impacts including older adults, children, people in poverty and people of color” said John Wasiutynski, director of the Multnomah County Office of Sustainability. “The County is committed to working with the communities we serve to ensure they are empowered to protect themselves and benefit from climate solutions.”
###

There's still time to submit comments for the draft 2015 Climate Action Plan for Portland and Multnomah County

Comments flowing in after two open houses and even more presentations to community groups.

CAP Open House AgendaJust two more weeks to submit your feedback on the City of Portland and Multnomah County's draft 2015 Climate Action Plan. The deadline for comments is Friday, April 10, 2015.

Download a copy of the plan or individual chapters that interest you most then submit a comment using the easy online form.

The draft plan provides a roadmap for the community to achieve an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with an interim goal of a 40 percent reduction by 2030.

“Total carbon emissions in the U.S. are up 7 percent since 1990. Here, in Portland and Multnomah County, we’ve cut total emissions by 14 percent, with 30 percent more people and over 75,000 more jobs. Clearly we are headed in a different direction," said Susan Anderson, director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. “The investments that have helped us cut energy use and reduce carbon emissions are the same things that make people want to live here: Creating walkable neighborhoods with shopping, restaurants and parks; investing in transit and bike facilities; and making our homes and buildings more efficient and comfortable.”

In 1993, Portland was the first city in the United States to create a local action plan for cutting carbon. The 2015 draft plan builds on Portland’s 20+ year legacy of climate action with ambitious new policies, fresh research on consumption choices and engagement with community leaders serving low-income households and communities of color to help ensure that all Portlanders benefit from the City and County’s climate action efforts.

“Climate change is a threat to the health and wellbeing of our entire community, but will fall hardest on those most vulnerable to climate change impacts including older adults, children, people in poverty and people of color” said John Wasiutynski, director of the Multnomah County Office of Sustainability. “The County is committed to working with the communities we serve to ensure they are empowered to protect themselves and benefit from climate solutions.”

Two open house events in March have sparked interest. Following community input and revisions, the draft plan will be considered for adoption by the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission, Multnomah County Board of Commissioners and the Portland City Council in June 2015.

As global leaders grapple with the concerns and opportunities the changing climate presents, Portland has become an international destination for planners and decision-makers seeking proven strategies for climate action. Since 2010, more than 160 delegations from around the world have come to Portland to speak with business and government leaders to understand how Portland has lowered emissions while welcoming growth and creating a more livable community. Portland and Multnomah County now have 12,000 clean tech jobs, an increase of 25 percent in the last 15 years.

Highlights of the draft Climate Action Plan

  • This summer TriMet will open Tilikum Crossing: Bridge of the People, the largest bridge in the United States to carry people on transit, bikes and on foot, but no cars. To accommodate the potential for higher river levels from climate change, the height of the bridge above the water was increased. The draft plan calls for continued investments that expand active transportation options throughout Portland and ensure those infrastructure investments are resilient to the impacts of climate change. 
  • Over the last five years, Portland residents have installed more than 2,000 solar systems and more than 3,500 homeowners have insulated their houses. The draft plan calls for doubling solar installations through efforts like community solar and continuing to weatherize homes at a faster rate than ever.
  • This spring the Portland City Council will consider an energy tracking and reporting policy for large commercial buildings. If adopted, the City will work with building owners and managers to access resources to improve the energy performance of Portland’s largest 1,000 commercial buildings.
  • Recent changes to garbage and composting service have led to a 37 percent reduction in garbage headed to the landfill. Residential bills are down two years in a row, while Portland’s recycling rate has reached 70 percent, one of the highest in the nation. The draft plan focuses on reaching renters and large multifamily communities to get those numbers even higher.
  • The draft plan also proposes to broaden the City’s work on waste to look at “upstream” opportunities to make more efficient use of existing goods, vehicles and buildings, such as car-sharing and short-term rentals. Other new business models are emerging to make it easier for people to rent, borrow, repair, and reuse everyday goods.

The 2015 Climate Action Plan includes new areas of focus

Advancing equity: Portland is changing. More than half of the students in Portland Public Schools, for example, are people of color. Low-income communities and people of color in Multnomah County are likely to experience the impacts of climate change more acutely, including increased air pollution and heat waves.

At the same time, these communities historically have not had the same access to the kinds of services and infrastructure that make low-carbon choices easier and affordable, such as frequent transit service and adequate sidewalks in East Portland or energy efficiency programs that benefit renters. From transportation investments and economic opportunities to tree plantings and policy engagement, the 2015 draft plan prioritizes actions that reduce disparities and ensure that under-served and under-represented communities share in the benefits of climate action work.

“Certain populations, including low-income households, communities of color, linguistically isolated households, renters and older adults may be less able to prepare for and recover from impacts from climate change,” said Claudia Arana Colen, health equity coordinator, Upstream Public Health. “I am pleased to see the needs of vulnerable populations prioritized, and expect Portland and Multnomah County to deliver on their commitments to these communities as they implement this plan.”

Exploring consumption: For the first time, the Climate Action Plan includes a consumption-based inventory, tallying carbon emissions associated with all of the goods and services that are produced elsewhere and consumed in Multnomah County. This inventory considers carbon emissions from the full lifecycle of goods and services, including production, transportation, wholesale and retail, use and disposal. Global carbon emissions as a result of local consumer demand are larger than the volume of emissions produced locally.

The addition of the consumption-based inventory offers insight into a wider range of opportunities to reduce carbon emissions. Residents, for example, can shift purchases toward goods that are durable and repairable. Businesses have opportunities throughout their supply chains to choose lower-carbon options, and new business models like car-sharing are emerging to make it easier to borrow, repair and reuse everyday goods.

Comments are due by April 10, 2015

  1. Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/climate for more information about the new plan, and to read specific chapters or download the full draft plan.
  2. Comments on the draft 2015 City of Portland and Multnomah County Climate Action Plan are due by April 10, 2015.
  3. Share your feedback on the draft plan using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by:
Email to: climate@portlandoregon.gov

Postal mail to:

RE: 2015 Climate Action Plan
City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Avenue, #7100
Portland, OR 97201