Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

More Contact Info

Subscribe to RSS feed

Most Recent

View Less

Future of the Powell-Division Corridor is Taking Shape

Powell-Division Transit and Development Project gathers community feedback in the Jade District and Midway; interactive mapping tool allows for virtual commenting

Community OutreachEvery day tens of thousands of people ride TriMet bus lines 4 and 9 between Portland and Gresham to connect to Portland’s Central City, Downtown Gresham, Portland Community College’s Southeast Center and many places in between. The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is collaborating with Metro, TriMet, the City of Gresham, ODOT and Multnomah County on the Powell-Division Transit and Development Project to provide faster, more reliable high capacity transit to more Portlanders, especially those living, working or going to school in East Portland.

The project team has been conducting extensive outreach, focusing on the needs and interests of East and Southeast Portland and Gresham residents as well as the many immigrant and refugee and limited English proficiency (LEP) populations in the area. In addition to focus groups and youth outreach, the City of Portland and Metro recently partnered with the Jade District and Division Midway Alliance for Community Improvement to host community workshops at local businesses at East Garden restaurant on SE Division and 124th and at Fubonn on SE 82nd Ave. Successful and lively events, the Jade District workshop on February 28 included live translation services for Cantonese and Vietnamese speakers provided by community leaders Rosaline Hui and Thao Tran, respectively. A joint Powell-Division and Mixed Use Zones Project open house was also held at Cleveland High School on March 10.

P-D Route Option

Community outreach has also been supported by Metro’s new interactive map tool, which asked participants to share their preferences for alignments and station area planning. Metro received more than 1,500 comments between February 13 and March 4, 2015, which were shared with the project's Steering Committee in advance of their March 16 meeting. Representatives from the Tongan community, the Russian Speaking Network and the Latino Network all spoke at the meeting, and youth organizers shared insights they gained while canvassing businesses in the City of Gresham. The project team is looking forward to them continuing their work as they move west into the City of Portland. Additional focus groups are slated for April and May, and staff will schedule presentations and discussions with Neighborhood Associations during that time as well.

At the same meeting the Steering Committee, which includes community and government agency representatives, reached consensus on the most promising route options for the new high-capacity transit services slated for the Powell-Division corridor. The new bus rapid transit service will travel from the Central City across the Tilikum Crossing, up Powell Blvd to either 50th, 52nd or 82nd Avenues, where it will head north to Division St. It will then travel on Division to Gresham, where it will connect to Mount Hood Community College. The Steering Committee expressed strong support for 82nd Ave as the north-south crossing, but some cautioned that additional engineering, design and traffic studies need to be completed to better understand the opportunities and challenges. Further refinements to the design will take place as the team moves into project development and completes additional engineering and traffic studies.

Planning and Sustainability Commission Moving Through Long Work Sessions for Comprehensive Plan While Considering Other Projects Too

Volunteer commissioners dive into discussions about housing, residential densities, employment land and West Hayden Island, the Transportation Systems Plan, community involvement and more

To attend a recent Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) meeting is to witness public service at its finest. Last fall the PSC held four public hearings throughout the city on the Comprehensive Plan Proposed Draft. And since January 27 of this year, commissioners have been holding long work sessions to review public testimony and staff recommendations as they move through the outstanding issues of the draft plan.

They’ve dug into the details of proposals for housing, addressing displacement, residential down-designations and densities, and nonconforming uses. They’ve had spirited discussions about centers and corridors and how the Transportation System Plan (TSP) would serve the additional people, jobs, housing and businesses in these growing areas. They’ve revisited West Hayden Island and considered strategies to create and intensify employment land to provide more jobs for Portlanders yet to come. And they’ve reviewed how the policies in the new Comprehensive Plan would guide decision-making and make the City’s public involvement efforts more inclusive.

Many of the PSC’s 11 members have served on the commission since the Portland Plan days (six years or more) and will continue on until they have recommended the Comprehensive Plan to City Council. Normally they meet for two to four hours twice a month, but the scope and complexity of the draft Comprehensive Plan, the update to the Central City Plan and other long-range plans, code amendments and special projects have meant more and longer meetings. To cover this much material and provide thoughtful and thorough guidance to the City Council, commissioners have spent countless hours preparing for and engaging in sometimes four and five-hour meetings every two weeks. You can read the meeting minutes and watch the video of each meeting on the PSC website.

Who are they?

These dedicated volunteers represent a broad spectrum of the community. They’re busy people whose love of Portland and commitment to making it better for everyone is reflected in their hard work on behalf of all Portlanders.

Take Chris Smith, digital marketer for Xerox who serves on the Portland Streetcar Inc. Board of Directors as well as many other advisory committees and commissions. And Michelle Rudd, a partner with Stoel Rives who was just named one of Savoy Magazine’s 2015 Most Influential Black Lawyers. People like Karen Gray, superintendent of the Parkrose School District. Or Don Hanson, principal at OTAK, who also served on the commission back when it was the Planning Commission. Teresa St Martin of Windermere and Margaret Tallmadge with the Coalition of Communities of Color, are the commission’s newest members. Mike Houck, executive director of Urban Greenspaces Institute, and Gary Oxman, retired Chief Health Officer for Multnomah County, look after our human and environmental health. Then there are vice chairs Howard Shapiro, who also chairs the Community Involvement Committee for the Comp Plan, and Katherine Schultz of GBD Architects. At the helm is André Baugh, a consultant with Group AGB Ltd, perhaps the commission’s most passionate equity advocate.

As a group, they have a variety of viewpoints, and together they work to balance and realize the goals of a prosperous, healthy and equitable city. In addition to working on the Comprehensive Plan, they’ve been holding hearings, briefings and meetings about Central City’s West Quadrant Plan, energy performance in commercial buildings, urban renewal areas and a proposal to build a propane transport facility at the Port’s T6 terminal.

What’s next?

In the next couple of months alone, they’ll be holding public hearings on the updated Economic Opportunities Analysis (April 28) and revised Growth Scenarios Report (May 12) for the Comprehensive Plan as well as the T6 code amendment (April 7), the RICAP 7 package (also April 28) and the SE Quadrant Plan (May 26). In addition they’ll hear briefings on the Powell-Division Transit and Development Project, something BPS is working on in partnership with Metro and TriMet. Please check the PSC calendar approximately one week prior to each tentative meeting date for specific agendas.

 

PSC News: March 24, 2015 Meeting Recap and Documents

Comprehensive Plan — work session

Agenda

  • Comprehensive Plan — work session

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer.dll/webdrawer/search/rec?sm_class=uri_7223&count&rows=50.

Ask the Curbside Hotline Operator: What plastics go in the blue recycling roll cart?

Plastic bottles and tubsQ: What plastics go in to the blue recycling roll cart?

A: The plastics accepted for curbside recycling are based on their size and shape.

  • Bottles with neck smaller than base (6 ounces or larger)
  • Tubs that are round or square (6 ounces or larger)
  • Pots for plants (4 inches or larger)
  • Buckets (5 gallons or smaller)

We know items come in plastic packaging of every shape, size and color. And while it can be confusing to know how to dispose of it when you are done, residents can recycle many plastic items (along with paper and metal) in the blue Portland Recycles! roll cart.

Portland does not use symbols or numbers to determine which plastics are accepted at the curb. Numbers are useful to manufacturers, but when it comes to recycling, they don’t tell the whole story.

Recycling depots accept many non-curbside plastics, including three Far West Recycling locations in Portland.

Want a detailed list of what goes in – or must stay out – of the blue recycling roll cart or other curbside containers?
Find information online or download a guide in 10 languages. And remember if an item is not on the “yes” recycling or composting list, the best place for it is in the garbage.

Have a question for our Curbside Hotline Operator?
Submit your question online or call 503-823-7202.

There's still time to submit comments for the draft 2015 Climate Action Plan for Portland and Multnomah County

Comments flowing in after two open houses and even more presentations to community groups.

CAP Open House AgendaJust two more weeks to submit your feedback on the City of Portland and Multnomah County's draft 2015 Climate Action Plan. The deadline for comments is Friday, April 10, 2015.

Download a copy of the plan or individual chapters that interest you most then submit a comment using the easy online form.

The draft plan provides a roadmap for the community to achieve an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with an interim goal of a 40 percent reduction by 2030.

“Total carbon emissions in the U.S. are up 7 percent since 1990. Here, in Portland and Multnomah County, we’ve cut total emissions by 14 percent, with 30 percent more people and over 75,000 more jobs. Clearly we are headed in a different direction," said Susan Anderson, director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. “The investments that have helped us cut energy use and reduce carbon emissions are the same things that make people want to live here: Creating walkable neighborhoods with shopping, restaurants and parks; investing in transit and bike facilities; and making our homes and buildings more efficient and comfortable.”

In 1993, Portland was the first city in the United States to create a local action plan for cutting carbon. The 2015 draft plan builds on Portland’s 20+ year legacy of climate action with ambitious new policies, fresh research on consumption choices and engagement with community leaders serving low-income households and communities of color to help ensure that all Portlanders benefit from the City and County’s climate action efforts.

“Climate change is a threat to the health and wellbeing of our entire community, but will fall hardest on those most vulnerable to climate change impacts including older adults, children, people in poverty and people of color” said John Wasiutynski, director of the Multnomah County Office of Sustainability. “The County is committed to working with the communities we serve to ensure they are empowered to protect themselves and benefit from climate solutions.”

Two open house events in March have sparked interest. Following community input and revisions, the draft plan will be considered for adoption by the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission, Multnomah County Board of Commissioners and the Portland City Council in June 2015.

As global leaders grapple with the concerns and opportunities the changing climate presents, Portland has become an international destination for planners and decision-makers seeking proven strategies for climate action. Since 2010, more than 160 delegations from around the world have come to Portland to speak with business and government leaders to understand how Portland has lowered emissions while welcoming growth and creating a more livable community. Portland and Multnomah County now have 12,000 clean tech jobs, an increase of 25 percent in the last 15 years.

Highlights of the draft Climate Action Plan

  • This summer TriMet will open Tilikum Crossing: Bridge of the People, the largest bridge in the United States to carry people on transit, bikes and on foot, but no cars. To accommodate the potential for higher river levels from climate change, the height of the bridge above the water was increased. The draft plan calls for continued investments that expand active transportation options throughout Portland and ensure those infrastructure investments are resilient to the impacts of climate change. 
  • Over the last five years, Portland residents have installed more than 2,000 solar systems and more than 3,500 homeowners have insulated their houses. The draft plan calls for doubling solar installations through efforts like community solar and continuing to weatherize homes at a faster rate than ever.
  • This spring the Portland City Council will consider an energy tracking and reporting policy for large commercial buildings. If adopted, the City will work with building owners and managers to access resources to improve the energy performance of Portland’s largest 1,000 commercial buildings.
  • Recent changes to garbage and composting service have led to a 37 percent reduction in garbage headed to the landfill. Residential bills are down two years in a row, while Portland’s recycling rate has reached 70 percent, one of the highest in the nation. The draft plan focuses on reaching renters and large multifamily communities to get those numbers even higher.
  • The draft plan also proposes to broaden the City’s work on waste to look at “upstream” opportunities to make more efficient use of existing goods, vehicles and buildings, such as car-sharing and short-term rentals. Other new business models are emerging to make it easier for people to rent, borrow, repair, and reuse everyday goods.

The 2015 Climate Action Plan includes new areas of focus

Advancing equity: Portland is changing. More than half of the students in Portland Public Schools, for example, are people of color. Low-income communities and people of color in Multnomah County are likely to experience the impacts of climate change more acutely, including increased air pollution and heat waves.

At the same time, these communities historically have not had the same access to the kinds of services and infrastructure that make low-carbon choices easier and affordable, such as frequent transit service and adequate sidewalks in East Portland or energy efficiency programs that benefit renters. From transportation investments and economic opportunities to tree plantings and policy engagement, the 2015 draft plan prioritizes actions that reduce disparities and ensure that under-served and under-represented communities share in the benefits of climate action work.

“Certain populations, including low-income households, communities of color, linguistically isolated households, renters and older adults may be less able to prepare for and recover from impacts from climate change,” said Claudia Arana Colen, health equity coordinator, Upstream Public Health. “I am pleased to see the needs of vulnerable populations prioritized, and expect Portland and Multnomah County to deliver on their commitments to these communities as they implement this plan.”

Exploring consumption: For the first time, the Climate Action Plan includes a consumption-based inventory, tallying carbon emissions associated with all of the goods and services that are produced elsewhere and consumed in Multnomah County. This inventory considers carbon emissions from the full lifecycle of goods and services, including production, transportation, wholesale and retail, use and disposal. Global carbon emissions as a result of local consumer demand are larger than the volume of emissions produced locally.

The addition of the consumption-based inventory offers insight into a wider range of opportunities to reduce carbon emissions. Residents, for example, can shift purchases toward goods that are durable and repairable. Businesses have opportunities throughout their supply chains to choose lower-carbon options, and new business models like car-sharing are emerging to make it easier to borrow, repair and reuse everyday goods.

Comments are due by April 10, 2015

  1. Visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/climate for more information about the new plan, and to read specific chapters or download the full draft plan.
  2. Comments on the draft 2015 City of Portland and Multnomah County Climate Action Plan are due by April 10, 2015.
  3. Share your feedback on the draft plan using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by:
Email to: climate@portlandoregon.gov

Postal mail to:

RE: 2015 Climate Action Plan
City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Avenue, #7100
Portland, OR 97201