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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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Planning and Sustainability Commission Approves Terminal 6 Environmental Zoning Code and Map Amendments

Pembina’s proposal to transport propane through Portland moves on to City Council; carbon fund established to offset effects of greenhouse gas emissions

On Tuesday, April 7, after a six-hour meeting (including four hours of testimony), Portland’s Planning and Sustainability Commission voted 6 to 4 in favor of recommending zoning code and map amendments to City Council that would accommodate Pembina’s proposal for a propane export facility at the Port of Portland’s Terminal 6.

The Zoning Code and Map amendments included:

  1. Amend the Environmental Overlay Zone to allow for the transport of propane through a pipe across an environmental overlay zone on sites zoned Heavy Industrial and only when the transporting is part of a river-dependent industrial use.
  2. Amend the zoning map to extend the existing environmental conservation overlay zone boundary to some of the currently unprotected significant natural resources identified in the adopted 2012 Citywide Natural Resources Inventory.
  3. Adopt a City-Port intergovernmental agreement (IGA) to address other issues not covered by the Zoning Code.

Intergovernmental Agreement
The IGA Framework covers a wide range of issues. It formally documents many of the commitments made by Calgary-based Pembina and the Port of Portland during the PSC hearings process. Some of the proposed terms address policy issues related to Portland’s Climate Action Plan; others address safety and community relations.

The key terms of the IGA include:

Community Advisory Committee (CAC): Provide a public forum to address operational issues that may affect the surrounding community, i.e. noise, lighting and other nuisance issues.

Safety: Ensure the Port and Pembina implement all of the safety measures, including providing the Portland Bureau of Fire and Rescue with the specialized equipment or training necessary to respond to an incident at the facility.

Onsite Energy Use: Require the facility meets 100 percent of its energy needs for onsite operations from Oregon renewable energy sources.

Grassland Habitat Mitigation: Ensure that the features and functions of the grassland special habitat area affected by the facility are fully replaced.

Environmental Impact Mitigation: Pembina to contribute $6.2 million annually to the Portland Carbon Fund to offset the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from the propane itself. The fund will be used for projects that reduce energy consumption, generate renewable energy and sequester carbon.

Liability: Provide insurance and other financial assurances to cover damages from a catastrophic event.

Much of the public testimony and discussion was about safety. Prior to the hearing, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability provided extensive information to the PSC about safety, including detailed reports from technical experts. The City hired an independent consultant (Arkana) to evaluate Pembina's Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA) performed by DNV GL, a Norwegian company that specializes in safety reviews for the world gas and oil industry. The final analysis put the odds of an injury to the nearest residents at about one every 10 million years. These and other documents from the April 7 meeting are posted on the PSC website.

Portland Carbon Fund
To account for carbon emissions from the propane, the PSC recommended an annual carbon mitigation contribution of $6.2 million/year to the City. This amount is estimated based on the life cycle of GHG emissions from the exported propane, including the processing, transport and end use of the fuel. These emissions have been discounted to account for some use of the propane in plastics manufacturing and as a transition fuel that will displace dirtier sources of fuel, such as coal and fuel oil.

Pembina’s contribution will be based on the market price for GHG emissions (roughly $6.77/metric ton CO2-equivalent or roughly a penny per gallon) in Europe, which has one of the most well-established trading programs in the world. If propane exports become subject to a carbon fee or pricing mechanism, the contribution will be re-evaluated.

The Portland Carbon Fund will be a separate fund administered by the City of Portland with oversight from an advisory board, much in the same way the City’s Children’s Levy is administered. This fund is different from the Community Investment Fund announced by Pembina and will fund projects across the city that reduce energy consumption, generate renewable energy, and sequester carbon.

Next Steps
With the PSC vote, the amendments and IGA move onto to City Council for another public hearing and a vote, tentatively scheduled for April 30 (time TBD). Check the Council agenda page about a week before to confirm the date and time.

For a recap of the April 7 public hearing and vote, please visit the PSC news feed

PSC News: April 14, 2015 Meeting Recap, Documents and Video

CC2035 SE Quadrant Plan — briefing; Comprehensive Plan — work session

Agenda

  • CC2035 SE Quadrant Plan — briefing
  • Comprehensive Plan — work session

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer.dll/webdrawer/search/rec?sm_class=uri_7223&count&rows=50.

Spring brings cleanup events to your neighborhood

Over 40 neighborhood cleanup events are scheduled around Portland in April and May 2015

Man sitting on a bike at a neighborhood cleanup

Is spring cleaning on your task list at home? There are over 40 neighborhood cleanup events scheduled around Portland in April and May 2015 to give residents a chance to remove unwanted clutter from their homes, basements and garages.

Neighborhood cleanups prioritize and promote both recycling and reuse over throwing away items in the garbage. The materials accepted at cleanup events vary, from bulky items like furniture, mattresses and appliances to items for recycling and reuse like scrap metal, building materials and household goods.

Volunteers from neighborhood associations coordinate these events and have been offering more options for reuse every year. In fact, there are about 30 events that will include onsite reuse options, allowing neighbors to take, swap or buy items immediately. 

The seven Neighborhood Coalitions are the best source of information about the scheduled cleanup events by neighborhood association.

Central Northeast Neighbors (CNN)
East Portland Neighborhood Office (EPNO)
Neighbors West/Northwest (NW/NW)
North Portland Neighborhood Services (NPNS)
Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN)
Southeast Uplift Neighborhood Coalition (SEUL)
Southwest Neighborhoods, Inc. (SWNI)

Need to find contact information for your neighborhood association?
Contact the Office of Neighborhood Involvement or call 503-823-4519

Have bulky items other times of the year?
Your garbage and recycling company can remove large items that are not reusable or recyclable for an extra charge. Call your company a week in advance and they will give you a cost estimate. For a reasonable charge, they will pick up appliances, furniture, large branches, stumps, and other big items. For curbside pickup, set bulky items at your curb on the day your garbage and recycling company has agreed to pick them up.

Need help remembering garbage day?
Sign up for free email reminders at www.garbagedayreminders.com.

PSC News: April 28, 2015 Meeting Recap and Documents

Multnomah County Health Building; RICAP 7; RICAP 8 Work Plan; Economic Opportunities Analysis

Agenda

  • Multnomah County Health Building — hearing / recommendation 
  • RICAP 7 — hearing / recommendation 
  • RICAP 8 Work Plan — hearing / recommendation 
  • Economic Opportunities Analysis — hearing / recommendation

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/webdrawer.dll/webdrawer/search/rec?sm_class=uri_7223&count&rows=50.  

Now through May 31, the public is invited to comment on an inventory of some of Portland’s favorite vistas of the Central City

Take a look at Portland’s iconic views and viewpoints in the updated Central City Scenic Resources Inventory; then tell the City what you think

Where do you take your out-of-town visitors to show off Portland? Up to the Washington Park Rose Garden to take in the sweeping, panoramic views of the skyline and Mt Hood? Maybe you head downtown for a stroll along the waterfront or South Park Blocks. Or take a ride on the Aerial Tram to OHSU for views of the many bridges over the Willamette River, special buildings and scenic landmarks.

Scenic resources like these help define the character of the Central City and shape the image of Portland and the region.

To help preserve these visual treasures, Portland manages an inventory of public views, viewpoints and other scenic resources within and of the Central City. At 25-years-old, the Central City portion of the Scenic Resources Inventory (CCSRI) is getting a refresh as part of the update of the Central City Plan.

Take a Look
The public is invited to review the draft CCSRI to help ensure that all Central City scenic resources are included in the inventory. Did we get them all? Did we miss something? Take a look and tell us what you think.

Public comments on the CCSRI are welcome through May 31, 2015.

How to Comment
Visit the project website for more information about the draft Central City Scenic Resources Inventory and to read or download specific chapters of the draft inventory.

Then share your feedback on the draft inventory using this online form.

Comments are also accepted by …

  • Phone: 503-823-7831
  • Email to: mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov
  • Postal mail to:

Mindy Brooks
City of Portland
Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100
Portland, OR 97201

Comments on the draft CCSRI are due by May 31, 2015.

Background and next steps
Last summer we asked the public to nominate their favorite views and viewpoints in the Central City. Those that met a set of criteria were added to the list of existing views and viewpoints from the 1989 inventory as well as new scenic resources identified in the field. Staff then put them in a database and subjected each view and viewpoint to rigorous analysis by a team of independent reviewers.
The resulting draft CCSRI includes a mix of scenic resources, including 152 views from 144 viewpoints, 15 view streets, 6 scenic corridors, 22 visual focal points and 5 scenic sites.

The purpose of the CCSRI is to provide useful information on the location and quality of existing public scenic resources in and around Portland’s Central City. The inventory includes descriptions, evaluations, photos and maps of public views and viewpoints, scenic corridors, view streets, visual focal points and scenic sites located in the Central City inventory area. The inventory does not make recommendations about which scenic resources should be protected.

Scenic resources in Portland have been protected over the past 30 years through various plans and regulations, including the 1983 Terwilliger Parkway Corridor Plan, 1987 Willamette Greenway Plan and 1991 Scenic Resources Protection Plan.