Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

More Contact Info

Subscribe to RSS feed

Most Recent

View Less

Draft report for the 82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development ready for public review

Planners look at the potential for new commercial and mixed use development along this major north/south corridor on the east side of Portland

The draft report for the 82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development and its related appendices are now available for public review. The study focuses on the challenges of and exploring opportunities for new development in the corridor alongside potential transportation improvements.

The 82nd Avenue Study looks at the development potential of properties along 82nd Avenue and identifies barriers that can be addressed in the near-term, with an eye toward long-term solutions.

Project goals

This study will:

  • Identify the most strategic locations for public action or investment support for businesses and property development on 82nd Avenue.
  • Generate policy recommendations to address physical and social needs in the corridor, and address barriers to development while managing equity and social issues.
  • Update our understanding of 82nd Avenue as a “Civic Corridor.”

A corridor is defined in Portland's new 2035 Comp Plan as: An area that may be a single major street or a broad mobility corridor, which provides connections for a range of transportation modes (transit, pedestrians, cyclists, freight, motor vehicles, etc.), not necessarily on the same street. A Civic Corridor is a prioritized subset of the city’s most prominent transit and transportation streets. They connect centers, provide regional connections, and include segments where commercial development and housing are focused. Civic Corridors are intended to continue their important transportation functions while providing livable environments for people, and evolving into distinctive places that are models of ecological design.

The 82nd Avenue Study is not intended to be a comprehensive planning effort for the corridor. Rather, it will complement the many other projects focusing on the corridor and build on collaborative efforts. Following this study, City Council could direct staff to generate a more robust “82nd Avenue Plan,” in partnership with community stakeholders.

What’s next?

The next steps for the public and project team include:

  1. Public review period for the Draft Report from January through March 2019.
  2. Planning and Sustainability Commission consideration. A public hearing is tentatively scheduled for March 12, 2019.
  3. City Council for adoption. Public hearings and a vote to be scheduled in April/May 2019.

Review the draft and comment

Community members are invited to review the draft report and appendices.

Submit comments to staff about the draft report by March 12, 2019.

Feedback will be reviewed as staff finalize the 82nd Avenue Study, which will go before City Council in April or May 2019.

PSC News: January 22, 2019 Meeting Recap

Historic Code Update Project — Briefing; Bike Parking Code – Hearing

Agenda

  • Historic Code Update Project – Briefing
  • Bike Parking Code – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

Waste Equity Workplan earns leadership award for BPS team

Workplan aims to increase equity and diversity in Portland’s garbage, recycling, and composting collection system.

Equity and diversity are priorities for the City of Portland. At the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS), that extends to our longtime role in managing contracts between the City and the companies that provide garbage, recycling and composting collection service. In December, the Oregon Chapter of the National Association of Minority Contractors (NAMC) presented BPS with the Agency Leadership Award for BPS’ work to advance equity and diversity in Portland’s waste collection system. 

(l-r) Andre Bealer, Program Manager, NAMC-Oregon; Bruce Walker, BPS; Nate McCoy, Executive Director, NAMC-Oregon; Arianne Sperry, BPS

“NAMC Oregon’s mission and mandate is Building Bridges – Crossing Barriers. We accomplish this by working with value-driven organizations who focus on minority business concerns and show a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI),” said Nate McCoy, NAMC executive director. “BPS was honored for the Agency Leadership Award because of their Equity Guiding Principles, leadership on stakeholder engagement and new policy and programming efforts underway. These policy and programs are vital tools to address the need to increase participation of workforce diversity and minority-owned business inclusion, more importantly, the need to create a conduit for diverse firms to have access to substantial and consistent opportunities to create generational wealth and legacies in their communities.”

BPS recently developed a Waste Equity Workplan to record the commitments that grew out of a recent residential garbage and recycling franchise review stakeholder process. The franchise review looked at ways to increase franchisee workforce diversity and reduce barriers to economic opportunities for minority-owned and woman-owned companies. 

During the year-long conversation, the scope expanded as participants realized that the collection system governed by the franchise agreement represents just 20 percent of the waste generated by Portland residents and businesses and to make real change, action needs to occur across all sectors of the waste system. 

The Waste Equity Workplan identifies the growing multifamily sector as a high priority for increasing access and opportunity for minority-owned and woman-owned companies.  In 2019 BPS will launch a process to engage stakeholders in considering options and selecting a path forward. 

The City’s own waste collection contracts represent another important opportunity, especially as BPS is poised to expand public trash collection across Portland.  The Waste Equity Workplan directs BPS to make changes to the procurement approach for waste collection from public trash cans and City offices and facilities to increase access for minority-owned and woman-owned companies. 

In December, BPS took a big step in that direction when City Council authorized an exemption from procurement rules for waste collection from public trash cans and City offices and facilities.  The exemption allows the City to direct procurements for public waste collection into a new Waste Collection Access and Opportunity Program that will be available to underrepresented contractors. 

BPS will use this new process during the procurement for waste collection from the new public trash cans that will be installed in East Portland this coming spring.  Over the next few months BPS will also convene a Waste Equity Advisory Group to provide feedback during implementation of the Waste Equity Workplan and to evaluate progress annually.

Questions?  Email wasteinfo@portlandoregon.gov or call 503-823-7202.    

Tidying up? Put your unwanted stuff in the hands of those who need it.

Your stuff matters, including what you no longer want or need.

Woman with basket full of items to donate

The new year brings resolutions and goals about getting organized and staying that way. If you are clearing clutter and are ready to part with items – from clothes, books and music to household goods, electronics and décor – then go local and donate usable items to Portland neighbors and organizations. These online tools make it easy for you to reuse, borrow and share stuff you longer want or need.

Many groups and organizations are free and offer Portland-area residents simple ways to move useful materials through the community and into the hands of others who need them.

Freecycle
Freecycle is a grassroots movement committed to a sharing economy and helping people give and gain cool free stuff. It promotes reuse and keeping usable items out of landfills.

Paying it Forward Store
The Paying it Forward Store helps those in immediate need of clothing, coats and shoes and connects to other like-minded organizations by collecting and distributing donated items.

Rooster
Rooster is a community of neighbors who share resources at no cost. It’s about borrowing things you need — and making rewarding connections in your community. Learn more about Rooster.

Nextdoor
Nextdoor is a tool for getting helpful recommendations and resources from neighbors in addition to borrowing, donating or selling items.  

Buy Nothing Project
Buy Nothing Project members post anything you’d like to give away, lend or share. It is neighborhood- and Facebook-based, focused on items you’d like to borrow or acquire, at no cost, from neighbors.

Other resources:

Have unusable bulky items?

Your garbage and recycling company can remove large items that are not reusable or recyclable for an extra charge. Call your company a week in advance and they will give you a cost estimate. For a reasonable charge, they will pick up appliances, furniture, large branches, stumps and other big items. For curbside pickup, set bulky items at your curb on the day your garbage and recycling company has agreed to pick them up.

Disclaimer: Neither BPS nor any of its partners endorse a business, company or any organization through the Curbsider Blog. Read the full disclaimer.

Portland Home Energy Score Celebrates Successful First Year

Homebuyers searching for a home in Portland in 2018 had better access to transparent energy efficiency information.

More than 8,700 homes received a Home Energy Score through the end of 2018 based on a new requirement within the city of Portland. Homes listed for sale must now include a Home Energy Report and the Score (on a scale from 1 to 10), which is generated through an in-home assessment. Homebuyers can use this information to better understand the full costs of home ownership and compare their choices. The report recommends the most cost-effective improvements to save energy – and money – on their utility bills.

Data from the first year of the Home Energy Score program shows that Portland homes have plenty of opportunities for improvement. The average Home Energy Score in Portland to-date is 4.6. If these homeowners implemented all the cost-effective improvements recommended in the Home Energy Report, they’d save an average of nearly 20 percent annually on utility bills. An energy efficiency improvement is considered cost-effective if it has a simple payback of 10 years or less.

Homeowners with the lowest Home Energy Scores – a score of 1, 2 or 3 – could save nearly 30 percent on their annual utility bills by implementing the recommended energy efficiency improvements. These lowest scoring homes represent nearly 40 percent of all homes that were scored in Portland.

The most cost-effective ways to save energy and increase comfort vary from home to home, but the most helpful measures help keep heat in during the winter and heat out in the summer. This includes attic and wall insulation and air and duct sealing. Mechanical upgrades for heating, cooling and water heating can also be cost-effective if replaced with more efficient models when the equipment reaches end-of-life.

Northeast Portland homeowner Marcia Norrgard received an initial Home Energy Assessment for her mid-century house and it scored a 1, even though it had a new high-efficiency furnace and new windows. However, the house had little attic or wall insulation and an inefficient water heater.

“I noticed that during the summer, my living room was getting hotter and hotter,” said Norrgard. She prefers a cool living space in the summer and knew there could be value in saving energy in the winter. Norrgard worked with local contractor Kris Grube of Good Energy Retrofit to increase her insulation levels and replace her water heater. These upgrades cost her less than $10,000 and her house now has a Home Energy Score of 7.

Besides benefiting homeowners’ bank accounts, reducing energy use in homes also helps reduce carbon pollution in the atmosphere, a benefit for the entire community.