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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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2019 Legislative Session Update

Housing and sustainability-focused bills will help increase housing opportunity and add to the sustainability toolkit in Portland.

The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability doesn’t just develop new zoning code and climate actions plans. Staff also work closely with the City of Portland’s legislative liaisons to ensure we’re achieving our goals for a healthy and equitable city at the state level. 

At the close of the 2019 state legislative session, an unprecedented number of bills we’ve advocated for passed into law. Below is a list of the most impactful bills on the future of housing and equitable opportunities for all Portlanders, as well as several that address waste reduction.

HOUSING-RELATED BILLS (PASSED)

HB 2001 – Middle Housing Requirement

HB2001 requires the state’s bigger cities to allow middle housing in single-dwelling zones. This mandate is larger than the scope of the Residential Infill Project: It allows duplexes everywhere, and triplexes, quadplexes, and cottage clusters in some single-dwelling neighborhoods. It applies to all single-dwelling residential zones, whereas RIP currently applies to R7, R5, and R2.5 zones. Currently, the bill requires cities to comply by June 2022, which will give us time to bring Portland’s RF, R20 and R10 zones into compliance.  

HB 20001 also includes direction to the Building Codes Division (BCD) to change the building code rules on converting existing single-dwellings to triplexes and quadplexes.

HB 2003 – Housing Needs Analysis

This bill creates a new performance measure for housing: a housing shortage analysis. The State of Oregon will do a statewide housing analysis and determine housing allocations for Oregon’s regions and local jurisdictions. Housing would be classified by type and affordability. Cities will be required to adopt a housing production strategy (after updating their buildable land inventories) to identify steps to remove financial and regulatory impediments to developing needed housing. Cities would need to update the analysis every six years.

SB 534 – Residential Narrow Lot Development

This bill was a high priority for the Portland homebuilders. It requires the City of Portland to allow development of at least one dwelling unit on each platted lot that is zoned for single-family development, subject to reasonable siting and design regulations. The new rules, which take effect March 1, 2020, would allow for more narrow lot, skinny house development than is recommended by the Residential Infill Project. Zoning map changes for areas with underlying historic narrow lot plats will need to be incorporated into RIP.

HB 2916 – Transitional Housing

Removes limits on the number of campgrounds allowed in a city, especially those for transitional housing.

HB 2423 – Small Home Specialty Code

Adopts International Residential Code Appendix Q as part of state building codes to regulate the construction of permanently sited small homes under 400 square feet, including sleeping lofts accessed by ladders. Requires small homes to include photoelectric smoke alarm. Adopts standards for residential fire sprinkler system.

SB 608 – No Cause Evictions and Rent Stabilization

Prohibits landlords from terminating month-to-month tenancy without cause after 12 months of occupancy. Limits maximum annual rent increase to seven percent above annual change in consumer price index. Declares emergency, effective on passage.

SUSTAINABILITY MEASURES

Sustainability wins and losses in the 2019 state legislative session.

Though HB 2020, Oregon’s Cap and Trade bill, did not reach the Governor’s desk, several bills addressing waste reduction passed, including:

  • HB 2509: Plastic bag ban
  • SB 90: Straw and condiments by request only
  • HB 3273: Drug takeback
  • HB 3114: Ecycles updates
  • SB 792: More regulations for auto dismantlers
  • SB 93: Bottle bill – redemption centers in rural areas
  • SB 247-B: Bottle bill expanded to hard kombucha
  • SB 522A: Bottle bill – limits out-of-state returns
  • SB 914: Bottle bill – OBRC product registry required

HB 2623 – Related to hydraulic fracturing (passed)

This bill prohibits the use of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas exploration and production. Recognizing the bill supports City of Portland Climate Action Plan goals, BPS supported this bill as a #1 priority.

Oregon E-Cycles turns 10

Statewide electronics recycling program celebrates 10 years

TVs and monitors being loaded into truck

The statewide electronics recycling program, Oregon E-Cycles, turns 10 this summer. That’s 10 years of free recycling options for Oregonians.

Residents can take computers (desktops, laptops and tablets), monitors, TVs and printers to participating Oregon E-Cycles collection sites for free recycling. Computer peripherals (keyboards and mice) are also accepted at no cost.

Obey the law: Don’t put electronics in the garbage

Ecycles logo and illustrations of electronics

Due to this producer responsibility program, remember that it is against Oregon state law for anyone to throw computers, monitors, TVs and printers in the trash. They must be taken to a participating electronics recycling collection site.

It is legal to throw peripherals, such as keyboards and mice, into the trash, however recycling is encouraged. Especially because our modern-day electronic devices contain toxic materials, such as lead, cadmium and mercury, which can be dangerous if even small amounts are released into the air, water or soil.

Find a collector in Portland, where there are over 40 locations to drop off up to seven items at a time.

#OREcycles10

Proposed amendment to deconstruction ordinance would increase deconstruction projects

City Council to consider raising the “year-built threshold” from 1916 to 1940; public comments welcome.

person deconstructing roof of house

In 2016, the Portland City Council adopted a deconstruction ordinance that requires projects seeking a demolition permit of a house or duplex to fully deconstruct that structure — if it was built in 1916 or earlier or designated as historic regardless of age. 

With Council’s unanimous approval of that ordinance, Portland became the first city in the country to ensure that valuable materials from our demolished houses and duplexes are salvaged for reuse instead of crushed and landfilled. To date, the existing deconstruction ordinance has resulted in more than 2 million pounds of material salvaged for reuse. 

Roughly 240 house demolition permits are applied for with the City of Portland each year. Houses built in 1916 or earlier represent approximately 33% of these demolition permits and fall under the current deconstruction ordinance. 

Raising the bar

Part of the phased approach in the original ordinance was a goal to raise the year-built threshold to 1940 by 2019. Given the successful outcomes of the ordinance to date, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is proposing to raise the “year-built threshold” from 1916 to 1940. This would result in approximately 66% of house demolition permits being subject to the ordinance. If approved, the proposed amendment would take effect Dec. 31, 2019.

Read the proposal summary and code language revisions

Benefits of deconstruction

From start to finish, deconstruction protects health, creates pathways to construction careers, and generates both affordable and high-end reusable building materials. By expanding the parameters for building age, more homes will be subject to the deconstruction requirements and the following benefits will accrue to the community:

  • A two-fold increase in capturing demolition waste, which can then be reused (annual increase of approximately 800,000 pounds).
  • The equivalent of removing approximately 128 more cars from Portland’s roads for a full year. 
  • More opportunities for both existing and new contractors. (Today there are 10 contractors – or companies – certified to perform work covered by the ordinance.)
  • Less dust than mechanical demolition and increased opportunities to discover unabated hazardous materials and allow for their safe removal before resuming work.
  • Even more opportunities for women, people of color and other under-represented communities in the field of construction.

Public comments welcome

Portlanders are invited to comment on the proposed amendments to the deconstruction ordinance, which include not only raising the year-built threshold from 1916 to 1940 but provide several code clarifications as well.

To submit comments or ask questions, contact Shawn Wood at shawn.wood@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-5468. 

The public comment period ends Aug. 15, 2019, at 4 p.m. A public hearing to consider the proposed amendments will be scheduled at Portland City Council in early fall. If approved by City Council, the proposed amendment would go into effect on Dec. 31, 2019.

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access. For accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or other services, please contact 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868.

PSC News: August 13, 2019 Meeting Information and Documents

Shared Equity Language Training – Briefing; Parkrose-Argay Development Study – Briefing

Agenda

  • Shared Equity Language Training – Briefing
  • Parkrose-Argay Development Study – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

PSC News: August 27, 2019 Meeting Information and Documents

PSC Bylaws – Briefing / Work Session; Housing Opportunities Initiative Update – Briefing

Agenda

  • PSC Bylaws – Briefing / Work Session
  • Housing Opportunities Initiative Update – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701