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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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Tidying up? Put your unwanted stuff in the hands of those who need it.

Your stuff matters, including what you no longer want or need.

Woman with basket full of items to donate

The new year brings resolutions and goals about getting organized and staying that way. If you are clearing clutter and are ready to part with items – from clothes, books and music to household goods, electronics and décor – then go local and donate usable items to Portland neighbors and organizations. These online tools make it easy for you to reuse, borrow and share stuff you longer want or need.

Many groups and organizations are free and offer Portland-area residents simple ways to move useful materials through the community and into the hands of others who need them.

Freecycle
Freecycle is a grassroots movement committed to a sharing economy and helping people give and gain cool free stuff. It promotes reuse and keeping usable items out of landfills.

Paying it Forward Store
The Paying it Forward Store helps those in immediate need of clothing, coats and shoes and connects to other like-minded organizations by collecting and distributing donated items.

Rooster
Rooster is a community of neighbors who share resources at no cost. It’s about borrowing things you need — and making rewarding connections in your community. Learn more about Rooster.

Nextdoor
Nextdoor is a tool for getting helpful recommendations and resources from neighbors in addition to borrowing, donating or selling items.  

Buy Nothing Project
Buy Nothing Project members post anything you’d like to give away, lend or share. It is neighborhood- and Facebook-based, focused on items you’d like to borrow or acquire, at no cost, from neighbors.

Other resources:

Have unusable bulky items?

Your garbage and recycling company can remove large items that are not reusable or recyclable for an extra charge. Call your company a week in advance and they will give you a cost estimate. For a reasonable charge, they will pick up appliances, furniture, large branches, stumps and other big items. For curbside pickup, set bulky items at your curb on the day your garbage and recycling company has agreed to pick them up.

Disclaimer: Neither BPS nor any of its partners endorse a business, company or any organization through the Curbsider Blog. Read the full disclaimer.

Portland Home Energy Score Celebrates Successful First Year

Homebuyers searching for a home in Portland in 2018 had better access to transparent energy efficiency information.

More than 8,700 homes received a Home Energy Score through the end of 2018 based on a new requirement within the city of Portland. Homes listed for sale must now include a Home Energy Report and the Score (on a scale from 1 to 10), which is generated through an in-home assessment. Homebuyers can use this information to better understand the full costs of home ownership and compare their choices. The report recommends the most cost-effective improvements to save energy – and money – on their utility bills.

Data from the first year of the Home Energy Score program shows that Portland homes have plenty of opportunities for improvement. The average Home Energy Score in Portland to-date is 4.6. If these homeowners implemented all the cost-effective improvements recommended in the Home Energy Report, they’d save an average of nearly 20 percent annually on utility bills. An energy efficiency improvement is considered cost-effective if it has a simple payback of 10 years or less.

Homeowners with the lowest Home Energy Scores – a score of 1, 2 or 3 – could save nearly 30 percent on their annual utility bills by implementing the recommended energy efficiency improvements. These lowest scoring homes represent nearly 40 percent of all homes that were scored in Portland.

The most cost-effective ways to save energy and increase comfort vary from home to home, but the most helpful measures help keep heat in during the winter and heat out in the summer. This includes attic and wall insulation and air and duct sealing. Mechanical upgrades for heating, cooling and water heating can also be cost-effective if replaced with more efficient models when the equipment reaches end-of-life.

Northeast Portland homeowner Marcia Norrgard received an initial Home Energy Assessment for her mid-century house and it scored a 1, even though it had a new high-efficiency furnace and new windows. However, the house had little attic or wall insulation and an inefficient water heater.

“I noticed that during the summer, my living room was getting hotter and hotter,” said Norrgard. She prefers a cool living space in the summer and knew there could be value in saving energy in the winter. Norrgard worked with local contractor Kris Grube of Good Energy Retrofit to increase her insulation levels and replace her water heater. These upgrades cost her less than $10,000 and her house now has a Home Energy Score of 7.

Besides benefiting homeowners’ bank accounts, reducing energy use in homes also helps reduce carbon pollution in the atmosphere, a benefit for the entire community.

PSC News: February 12, 2019 Meeting Recap

Bike Parking Code – Work Session / Recommendation; Residential Infill Project – Briefing: Revised Proposed Draft

Agenda

  • Bike Parking Code – Work Session / Recommendation
  • Residential Infill Project – Briefing: Revised Proposed Draft

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

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The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

Apply to be a member of the Planning and Sustainability Commission

Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission is looking to fill vacancies this Spring

**Updated May 20, 2019: The Mayor has selected his three nominees for this PSC recruitment, which will be confirmed at City Council on Wednesday, May 22, at 10:10 a.m. Time Certain.**

The Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) includes 11 volunteer members with expertise in a range of areas. As a group, they balance a variety of City goals. We are currently seeking a member to fill a vacant position on the Commission.

The PSC has specific responsibility for the stewardship, development and maintenance of the City's Comprehensive Plan, Climate Action Plan and Zoning Code. Their recommendations to City Council on Portland’s long-range goals, policies and programs for land use, planning and sustainability aim to create a more prosperous, educated, healthy, resilient and equitable city.

The work of the PSC is to:

  • Advise City Council and City bureaus on social, economic and environmental issues as well as long-range development in Portland; and on the development and maintenance of the City’s Comprehensive Plan and implementation measures.
  • Ensure sustainability principles and practices and equity considerations are integrated into policy, planning and development decisions.
  • Advise City Council, as well as City bureaus and other agencies, on projects and proposals that significantly affect the city.

More information about the PSC.

Application Process

As the Zoning Code requires, the membership of the PSC “should include broad representation of Portland’s community and reflect the dynamic nature of this changing city.” To balance and diversify the current composition of the PSC, at this time we are especially interested in adding a member who has experience and knowledge about innovative urban solutions, new technologies, community building, affordable housing, green building or efforts to make Portland a thriving, livable city for all.

Typical time commitment for PSC members includes two 3-hour monthly meetings, reading/preparation time prior to each meeting, as well as possible additional time on sub-committees. Because this appointment will fill a position that is mid-term, this position will have approximately nine months of service at the initial confirmation, with the option for the Commissioner to serve an additional two 4-year terms.

To indicate your interest in serving on the Planning and Sustainability Commission, please review the position announcement and submit your application.

The PSC values diversity and encourages everyone who is interested in this position to apply. Applications for those who apply that are not selected will be kept on file for two years for consideration when a position is again open or vacated.

Ezone Update Project

Residents and property owners in Northwest Portland are invited to review draft remapped environmental overlay zones and attend neighborhood meetings in February, March and April.

Environmental planners head to the hills ... Northwest Hills, that is.

The Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is in the process of correcting ezone maps around the city. Ezones are a tool to help protect natural resources, such as trees, streams, steep slopes and wildlife habitat in Portland.

So far, staff have produced draft maps and conducted site visits in Johnson Creek Watershed as well as the Eastern Buttes and Terraces in N/NE Portland to update the ezones there. 

Now, we’re headed to the Northwest Hills for site visits and conversations with property owners.

ezone update

Postcards in the mail

If you own property in Northwest Portland and you have 1) existing ezones on your property; 2) the ezones are proposed to change on your property; or 3) new ezones are proposed for your property, you will receive a postcard in the mail.

How will this affect you?

We expect the environmental overlay zones will only change slightly on most properties. But some properties may have expanded ezones; others may have smaller ones.

Find your property on a map

You can use the Ezone Review Mapto look up your property. This map will tell you what kinds of environmental protections apply now and what are proposed to change. You can also request a site visit through the Ezone Review Map, and staff will come to your property to review the data.

How do I use the Ezone Review Map?

Learn more at meetings near you

Project staff will be attending neighborhood meetings in February, March and April to talk with residents and answer questions. Look for a meeting near you on the project calendar.

  • February 4th: Northwest Heights Neighborhood Association
  • March 6th: Linnton Neighborhood Association
  • March 19th: Forest Park Neighborhood Association
  • April 9th: Hillside Neighborhood Association

ezone under consideration

What are environmental overlay zones

What’s an ezone? It’s a tool that the City of Portland uses to help protect important natural resources, such as streams, wetlands, forests, steep slopes, wildlife habitat and floodplains for more than 30 years. Since the ezones were applied in the NW Hills between 1992 and 1999, new development has occurred, trees have grown or died, and creeks and streams have shifted their course.

Also, technology has improved so much that we can more accurately map the important resources that should be protected. This project is using this new technology and on-the-ground site visits to realign the ezone boundaries to match the actual location of natural resource features on the ground. 

For more information

Website: www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/76989
Email: ezone@portlandoregon.gov
Phone: (503) 823-4225