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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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Building Healthy Connected Communities Along Division Transit report ready for public review

Community members invited to review proposed improvements to the Division Transit corridor, related actions, transportation proposals and policy recommendations.

The final report for the Building Healthy Connected Communities Along the Division Transit Corridor is now available for public review. The report focuses on three areas long the Division Transit project alignment between SE 76th and the Gresham city limits near SE 174th. The three areas are the Jade District, Division Midway, and 162nd Avenue.

The report includes information about opportunities and constraints for each focus area. And the recommendations serve primarily as a resource and stepping stone to further action.

Key recommendations in the report include:

  1. Street spacing standards. Provide the option for a new connection to be built in phases across multiple properties to increase feasibility on more sites.
  2. Small area and site planning. Zoning code and area planning tools can be adjusted to make development of opportunity sites more feasible as well as achieve policy objectives.
  3. Technical assistance. The City should create a program or practice of ongoing conversations with property owners and businesses not only in the Division Transit Corridor but all East Portland (including 82nd Ave) as well.
  4. Street plans. Continue development and implementation of adopted street plans.
  5. New policy, programs and tools. A finer grained pedestrian and bike (multi-modal) system is needed in East Portland. The City and its partners should continue exploring additional funding mechanisms for sidewalks and other pedestrian and bike priority infrastructure.
  6. Add several transportation projects in East Portland Centers to the Transportation System Plan (TSP) and Transportation System Development Charges (TSDC) project lists to improve safety, access and connectivity.

This report is one deliverable within a suite of coordinated actions taken in conjunction with the Division Transit project. Key partners in the project and these related actions are Metro, TriMet, Prosper Portland, and the City of Gresham.

WHAT’S NEXT?

The next steps for the public and project team include:

  1. Public review period for the final report from August through December 2019.
  2. Portland City Council consideration: A public hearing is tentatively planned for December 2019.
  3. City Council adoption: A vote will be scheduled in December 2019.

REVIEW THE FINAL REPORT AND COMMENT

Community members are invited to review the final report for the Building Healthy Connected Communities Along the Division Transit Corridor.

Submit comments to staff about the report by December 1, 2019.

 

For more information, contact Marty Stockton at the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability at 503-823-2041 or Marty.Stockton@portlandoregon.gov

 

 

 

 

 

The final report for the Building Healthy Connected Communities Along the Division Transit Corridor is now available for public review. The report focuses on three areas long the Division Transit project alignment between SE 76th and the Gresham city limits near SE 174th. The three areas are the Jade District, Division Midway, and 162nd Avenue.

The report includes information about opportunities and constraints for each focus area. And the recommendations serve primarily as a resource and stepping stone to further action.

Key recommendations in the report include:

1.      Street spacing standards. Provide the option for a new connection to be built in phases across multiple properties to increase feasibility on more sites.

2.      Small area and site planning. Zoning code and area planning tools can be adjusted to make development of opportunity sites more feasible as well as achieve policy objectives.

3.      Technical assistance. The City should create a program or practice of ongoing conversations with property owners and businesses not only in the Division Transit Corridor but all East Portland (including 82nd Ave) as well.

4.      Street plans. Continue development and implementation of adopted street plans.

5.      New policy, programs and tools. A finer grained pedestrian and bike (multi-modal) system is needed in East Portland. The City and its partners should continue exploring additional funding mechanisms for sidewalks and other pedestrian and bike priority infrastructure.

6.      Add several transportation projects in East Portland Centers to the Transportation System Plan (TSP) and Transportation System Development Charges (TSDC) project lists to improve safety, access and connectivity.

This report is one deliverable within a suite of coordinated actions taken in conjunction with the Division Transit project. Key partners in the project and these related actions are Metro, TriMet, Prosper Portland, and the City of Gresham.

WHAT’S NEXT?

The next steps for the public and project team include:

1.      Public review period for the final report from August through December 2019.

2.      Portland City Council consideration: A public hearing is tentatively planned for December 2019.

3.      City Council adoption: A vote will be scheduled in December 2019.

REVIEW THE FINAL REPORT AND COMMENT

Community members are invited to review the final report for the Building Healthy Connected Communities Along the Division Transit Corridor.

Submit comments to staff about the report by December 1, 2019.

Ø  Email: Marty.Stockton@portlandoregon.gov

Ø  Call: Marty Stockton, Project Manager at (503) 823-2041.

For more information, contact Marty Stockton at the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability at 503-823-2041 or Marty.Stockton@portlandoregon.gov.

 

PSC News: August 27, 2019 Meeting Information and Documents

PSC Bylaws – Briefing / Work Session; Housing Opportunities Initiative Update – Briefing

Agenda

  • PSC Bylaws – Briefing / Work Session
  • Housing Opportunities Initiative Update – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

City of Portland names three members to PCEF Selection Advisory Committee (SAC)

The SAC will recommend community members from a list of applicants for City Council consideration for nine-member PCEF Grant Committee.

Portland, OR — City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) has selected three members to serve on a Selection Advisory Committee (SAC) for the Portland Clean Energy Community Benefits Energy Fund (PCEF). This SAC will recommend potential candidates to the Mayor and City Council for the PCEF Grant Committee.

The following SAC members bring valuable perspectives to help evaluate the applicants for a candidate pool that can implement a program envisioned by the community coalition that led the ballot initiative last fall:

  • Lenny Dee – Lenny brings years of experience volunteering his time and skills for the Portland Clean Energy Fund community coalition that helped pass Measure 26-201 in 2018. A long-time community advocate for climate action, he has an extensive knowledge of the Portland Clean Energy Fund measure and its intent.
  • Irene Marion – As the Equity and Inclusion Manager at the Portland Bureau of Transportation, Irene works to empower communities that have been historically marginalized in bureaucratic government processes. Irene has actively supported the development and cultivation of various PBOT public advisory bodies.
  • Ryan Curren – As the Bureau of Planning & Sustainability’s lead for the SW Corridor Equitable Housing Strategy and station area planning, Ryan brings a multidisciplinary approach to planning for a just and sustainable Portland that works better for everyone.

The PCEF Grant Committee

In November 2018, Portland voters passed Ballot Measure 26-102 – the Portland Clean Energy Community Benefits Fund – with 65% of the vote. PCEF is anticipated to bring $54 to $71 million in new revenue for green jobs and healthy homes for all Portlanders, especially those most susceptible to the impacts of climate change. ­­The PCEF Grant Committee is required per Portland City Code (PCC) 7.07, which codified Measure 26-102.

The PCEF Grant Committee will make grant funding recommendations to the Mayor and City Council for the PCEF program. The committee will also be central to overseeing the design, development, and implementation of the PCEF program.

PCEF Grant Committee nomination process

Each City Council member (including the Mayor) will nominate one committee member based on qualifications set forth in PCC 7.07.050, Section D. Those five nominees, once appointed, shall then recommend four additional members to the Mayor for appointment.

While the Mayor and City Council will have access to the entire 113 applicants, the SAC will recommend the top 15 – 25 candidates based on criteria in PCC 7.07.050, Section D. The diagram above shows how the SAC may interpret these criteria.

Stay informed about updates, events, program design and other happenings related to PCEF.

PSC News: August 13, 2019 Meeting Information and Documents

Shared Equity Language Training – Briefing; Parkrose-Argay Development Study – Briefing

Agenda

  • Shared Equity Language Training – Briefing
  • Parkrose-Argay Development Study – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

Proposed amendment to deconstruction ordinance would increase deconstruction projects

City Council to consider raising the “year-built threshold” from 1916 to 1940; public comments welcome.

person deconstructing roof of house

In 2016, the Portland City Council adopted a deconstruction ordinance that requires projects seeking a demolition permit of a house or duplex to fully deconstruct that structure — if it was built in 1916 or earlier or designated as historic regardless of age. 

With Council’s unanimous approval of that ordinance, Portland became the first city in the country to ensure that valuable materials from our demolished houses and duplexes are salvaged for reuse instead of crushed and landfilled. To date, the existing deconstruction ordinance has resulted in more than 2 million pounds of material salvaged for reuse. 

Roughly 240 house demolition permits are applied for with the City of Portland each year. Houses built in 1916 or earlier represent approximately 33% of these demolition permits and fall under the current deconstruction ordinance. 

Raising the bar

Part of the phased approach in the original ordinance was a goal to raise the year-built threshold to 1940 by 2019. Given the successful outcomes of the ordinance to date, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is proposing to raise the “year-built threshold” from 1916 to 1940. This would result in approximately 66% of house demolition permits being subject to the ordinance. If approved, the proposed amendment would take effect Dec. 31, 2019.

Read the proposal summary and code language revisions

Benefits of deconstruction

From start to finish, deconstruction protects health, creates pathways to construction careers, and generates both affordable and high-end reusable building materials. By expanding the parameters for building age, more homes will be subject to the deconstruction requirements and the following benefits will accrue to the community:

  • A two-fold increase in capturing demolition waste, which can then be reused (annual increase of approximately 800,000 pounds).
  • The equivalent of removing approximately 128 more cars from Portland’s roads for a full year. 
  • More opportunities for both existing and new contractors. (Today there are 10 contractors – or companies – certified to perform work covered by the ordinance.)
  • Less dust than mechanical demolition and increased opportunities to discover unabated hazardous materials and allow for their safe removal before resuming work.
  • Even more opportunities for women, people of color and other under-represented communities in the field of construction.

Public comments welcome

Portlanders are invited to comment on the proposed amendments to the deconstruction ordinance, which include not only raising the year-built threshold from 1916 to 1940 but provide several code clarifications as well.

To submit comments or ask questions, contact Shawn Wood at shawn.wood@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-5468. 

The public comment period ends Aug. 15, 2019, at 4 p.m. A public hearing to consider the proposed amendments will be scheduled at Portland City Council in early fall. If approved by City Council, the proposed amendment would go into effect on Dec. 31, 2019.

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access. For accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or other services, please contact 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868.