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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Release: New bus-only lane coming to NW Everett Street this weekend

The new Business Access and Transit Lane will speed up trips for thousands of transit riders whose buses cross the Steel Bridge

Rendering of NW 4th Ave and NW Everett

A new Business Access and Transit lane will be installed on NW Everett Street this weekend, from NW Broadway to the Steel Bridge. Rendering by Jake Marshall, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

(August 8, 2019) Portlanders commuting by bus on NW Everett Street from NW Broadway to the Steel Bridge will notice a more efficient commute next week, following the installation of the NW Everett Bus Lane Project this weekend by Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) crews.

The NW Everett Bus Lane project will improve transit reliability and access to the Rose Quarter for thousands of commuters on TriMet bus lines 4, 8, 16, 35, 44 and 77 by creating a Business Access and Transit (BAT) lane approaching the Steel Bridge. BAT lanes are primarily dedicated for transit use but allow some general traffic circulation for turning into driveways or onto intersecting streets. The new bus lane will replace one of the existing travel lanes on NW Everett and run six blocks from NW Broadway to the ramp up onto the Steel Bridge. The project will also close the ramp from southbound Naito to the Steel Bridge to reduce the number of merging conflicts and increase safety for vehicles crossing the bridge.

Transit is one of the most efficient, equitable, and sustainable ways to move people in cities. Improvements like these on NW Everett Street reduce congestion and make riding the bus more convenient and reliable, encouraging more Portlanders to leave their cars at home when traveling into the Central City.

In addition to MAX trains and private vehicles, the upper deck of the Steel Bridge carries over 4,000 daily commuters on TriMet bus lines 4, 8, 35, 44 and 77. Data from TriMet shows that these buses are stuck in congestion approaching the Steel Bridge. On the average weekday evening commute, buses travel less than 10 mph when approaching the Steel Bridge and less than 5mph on the ramp to the bridge.

Congestion has been worsening for TriMet buses on the stretch of NW Everett between NW Broadway, resulting in delays that can ripple across the transit network. The average speed of Line 4-Fessenden, for example, has decreased 14% in the last 10 years.

The new Business Access and Transit (BAT) lane on NW Everett will increase transit reliability, speed, and access to the Rose Quarter Transit Center. The project will also address merging conflicts on the ramps to the bridge by closing the southbound Naito ramp to the Steel Bridge, further improving transit commutes out of downtown. Parking will be maintained on both sides of NW Everett Street and people driving will still be able to make right turns to travel south from the BAT lane and access driveways. Traffic modeling predicts the Everett BAT lane will be a meaningful time saver for bus riders, providing up to a 50% time savings for TriMet buses in the project area.

Overview rendering of NW Everett St to Steel Bridge

The NW Everett Bus Lane Project is one of 18 projects identified in Central City in Motion, Portland’s plan to implement safer crossings, bus lanes, and bikeways transportation improvements in the city’s core. During the planning process, concern about traffic congestion on the approaches to Portland’s Willamette River bridges was a recurring theme. The NW Everett Bus Lane Project and SW Madison Bus and Bike Lane Project, among other Central City in Motion projects, are helping reduce travel time for bus commuters. The NW Everett Bus Lane Project is one of 18 Central City in Motion projects.

The first BAT lane project from Central City in Motion was installed in May on SW Madison. For the SW Madison Bus and Bike Lane Project, PBOT installed a protected bus and bike lane that allows buses to avoid congestion approaching the Hawthorne Bridge. TriMet’s Line 2, 6, 10 and 14 all traverse the Hawthorne, and similar to buses crossing the Steel Bridge, were experiencing increasing delays in the evening commute. Early data from TriMet shows that in the project area Line 2 buses are now 20% faster in the evening commute, Line 10 buses are 12% faster all day, and buses on the Line 14 saw a 60% increase in reliability, meaning they are now more likely to be on schedule thanks to the BAT lane.

Photo of recently completed SW Madison Bus and Bike Lane Project

The recently completed SW Madison Bus and Bike Lane Project is already helping reduce travel time for bus commuters. Photo by Gabe Graff, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

The NW Everett Bus Lane Project and SW Madison Bus and Bike Lane Project, among other Central City in Motion projects, are helping reduce travel time for bus commuters while also helping Portland tackle the climate crisis. More than 40% of local carbon emissions come from transportation, and local transportation emissions have increased in recent years. Switching to public transit is one of the most effective ways people can reduce their individual carbon footprint.

PBOT crews will work on Aug. 10 and 11 between 3 a.m. and 1 p.m. to install the new lane. During construction, one lane on NW Everett Street will remain open for people driving and biking. Sidewalks will remain open for people walking. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane detours and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible. Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

The project is funded in partnership between TriMet, the City of Portland and Metro’s Enhanced Transit Concepts program. For more information, visit the NW Everett Bus Lane Project webpage or contact the project manager:

Gabe Graff, 503-823-5291, gabriel.graff@portlandoregon.gov.


Making Transit Better 

Through a strategic partnership and commitment to make transit better, TriMet, PBOT and many others are working together to speed up buses and keep them on time. When transit is safe, efficient and dependable, it’s a better option for getting to work, school, appointments and entertainment. The more people ride, the fewer cars are on the road. As a result, we can all enjoy less traffic congestion, cleaner air and more vibrant, livable neighborhoods. Plan your next trip at trimet.org

Traffic Advisory: Bridge Pedal will impact Sunday morning traffic

 

 

NEWS RELEASE

 

 

For More Information, Call:

 

Mike Pullen, Multnomah County, (503) 209-4111

mike.j.pullen@multco.us

 

Don Hamilton, ODOT, (503) 731-8265

Don.Hamilton@odot.state.or.us

 

Dylan Rivera, PBOT, (503) 823-3723

dylan.rivera@portlandoregon.gov

 

Roberta Altstadt, TriMet, (503) 962-5669

altstadr@trimet.org  

  

 August 8, 2019

 

PORTLAND, OR -- The annual Providence Bridge Pedal on Sunday morning, August 11,  involves seven Willamette River bridges and the streets connecting them to accommodate thousands of bicyclists and pedestrians taking part in the event. The event requires some changes in how motorists get around the city, especially when crossing the Willamette River. Bridge sidewalks remain open during the event but all travelers should expect delays on Portland bridges in the central city and nearby roads before, during and immediately after the event.  All bridges should be fully reopened by noon.

The Broadway, Burnside, St. Johns, and Tilikum Crossing bridges are not included in this year’s route.  

 

Wondering which bridges are opened or closed? View or download this handy graphic 

 

List of bridges

The following information applies to motorized traffic on Portland bridges on August 11 during Bridge Pedal. Times are approximate:

  • On the Sellwood Bridge, participants will use the north sidewalk and bike lane. Traffic lanes remain open in both directions.
  • The Ross Island Bridge will be closed to westbound traffic from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The Marquam Bridge (Interstate 5) will be closed to northbound (upper deck) traffic from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The Hawthorne Bridge will have one lane open in each direction. The outside eastbound and inside westbound lanes are closed from 4 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., as well as the bridge onramp from northbound SW Naito Parkway.
  • The Morrison Bridge will have all westbound lanes and one eastbound lane open. The south and center eastbound lanes will be closed from 4 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., as well as the bridge onramp from SW Naito Parkway.
  • The Steel Bridge will be closed to eastbound traffic from 6:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.   MAX trains will operate in both directions, with adjusted operations at Interstate/Rose Quarter Station, near the bridge, during the Lloyd MAX Improvements, with no additional disruption.  
  • Fremont Bridge (Interstate 405) will be closed to southbound (upper deck) traffic from 4 a.m. until noon, with access by bicyclists ending at 11:30 a.m.               

Bridge Pedal will also require traffic changes on several state highways Sunday morning, including:

  • I-5 and I-405: During the temporary Marquam Bridge closure (from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.) motorists approaching the Marquam Bridge from I-5 northbound will be routed to I-405 northbound, across the lower deck of the Fremont Bridge, back to I-5 northbound. The north and southbound ramps from I-5 to southbound I-405 will be closed from 4 a.m. to noon.
  • All southbound lanes of I-405 will be closed between I-5 at the north end of the Fremont Bridge to the Marquam Bridge.  Motorists traveling to I-405 southbound from I-5 southbound will continue on I-5 southbound across the lower deck of the Marquam Bridge to I-405 northbound. All on- and off-ramps to northbound I-405 will remain open through downtown Portland.
  • All southbound lanes of I-5 and all northbound lanes of I-405 will remain open at all times.
  • The ramp from NW Couch St. and NW 16th Ave. to I-405 southbound will be closed from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The ramp from SW Taylor St. and SW 13th Ave. to southbound I-405 will be closed from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The ramp from SW Montgomery St. and SW 13th Ave. to southbound I-405 will be closed from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The ramp from SW 5th Ave. to I-405 southbound will be closed from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • The ramp from I-405 southbound to U.S. 30 westbound will be closed from 4 a.m. to noon.
  • North Going Street to I-5 south will be closed from 4 a.m. to noon.
  • Access to I-84 will be open from I-5 southbound.
  • North Cook Street and North Kerby access to the top deck of the Fremont Bridge will be closed from 4 a.m. to noon.
  • Starting at 4 a.m., motorists traveling eastbound on U.S. 26 (Sunset Highway) to I-405 southbound will take northbound I-405 across the Fremont Bridge to southbound I-5. This detour will remain until 11 a.m.
  • The ramp from SE Woodward St. to Ross Island Bridge westbound will be closed from 4 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • Oregon Highway 43 (SW Macadam Ave.): Starting at 6 a.m., one northbound lane will close at SW Carolina St. and exits will close to Hwy. 26 eastbound, Ross Island and Highway 26 west/City Center until 10 am.
  • U.S. 30: From 4 a.m. to 11 a.m. the ramp from U.S. 30 eastbound to I-405 southbound will be closed.  The ramp being closed is NW Bridge Ave. between the bridge and U.S. 30 eastbound.

Portland streets will also be affected on Sunday morning, including:

  • Northbound Naito Parkway will be closed between the Ross Island Bridge ramp to NW Davis.  All northbound traffic will be routed eastbound across the Ross Island  Bridge.
  • Naito Parkway will be closed in both directions between SW Jefferson and NW Davis. 
  • SE Clay will be closed to traffic west of SE Second Ave.
  • SE Water Ave. will be closed from SE Caruthers to SE Stark.

TriMet buses and MAX trains may experience delays downtown during the event. 

The following bus lines will have minor detours from 5 a.m. until the event concludes: 2-Division, 4-Fessenden, 6-Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 8-Jackson Park/NE 15th, 14-Hawthorne, 15-Belmont/NW 23rd, 19-Woodstock/Glisan, 24-Fremont/NW 18th, 35-Macadam/Greeley, 44-Capitol Hwy/Mocks Crest, 54-Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy, 56-Scholls Ferry Rd, and 77-Broadway/Halsey.  Signs will direct riders to nearby and temporary stops for buses affected by detours. Check before you go at trimet.org/alerts.

Portland Streetcar will operate a normal Sunday schedule. 

The Hawthorne, Morrison and Steel drawbridges will not open for river traffic between 6:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

The Oregon Department of Transportation maintains the Fremont, Marquam, and Ross Island bridges.  Multnomah County maintains the Hawthorne, Morrison and Sellwood bridges. Union Pacific Railroad maintains the Steel Bridge.

For Bridge Pedal information, visit www.providence.org/bridgepedal

# # #

News Blog: Pedestrians over age 65 at greater risk of dying in Portland traffic crashes

In the last five years, adults ages 65 or older made up 26% of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland

Vision Zero Portland logo

(July 30, 2019) Older adults make up an increasingly large proportion of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland based on an analysis of crash data since 2010. 

In the last five years, adults ages 65 or older made up 26% of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland, compared to 16% in the prior 5-year period:

Pedestrian Deaths age 65+ Portland

 

Older adults make up approximately 12% of Portland’s population, indicating that they are increasingly overrepresented in pedestrian deaths.  

People 65 and older make up 16% of total traffic deaths in Portland since 2010. 

“Our streets need to serve everyone, including people who are older and can no longer drive safely,” says Bandana Shrestha, Community Engagement Director for AARP Oregon. “Aging in place can be a wonderful option, but it becomes much harder where people must navigate wide, fast streets that lack convenient and safe crosswalks.” 

Older pedestrians particularly vulnerable  

 

A majority of older adults killed in Portland crashes since 2010 were walking or using a mobility device at the time of their death:

ped deaths portland

 

This finding aligns with state and national data. In Oregon, adults over age 50 were 64% more likely to be hit and killed while walking compared to people under 50 according to a recent analysis supported by AARP. Across the U.S., pedestrians age 70 and older have the highest per capita death rates. Incidence of older pedestrian deaths has been attributed to several factors. This includes when older pedestrians don’t have adequate space or time to cross the street at a slower pace, when older pedestrians have difficulty identifying safe gaps in which to cross traffic, or because older pedestrians are more fragile.

National data also show that pedestrian deaths have increased 51% from 2009 to 2018 at the same time that they fell in Europe. The surge in pedestrian deaths may be related to the increasing prevalence of SUVs, which are twice as likely to kill pedestrians in a crash. 

“Every traffic death is a tragedy, but it’s especially alarming to see so many older adults dying in crashes,” says Chris Warner, Transportation Director. “This is another reminder that we need to keep designing and managing our streets with the most vulnerable people at the top of our minds and creating a safe street system, and that we all need to look out for each other when traveling.” 

 

Safe speeds especially important for older adults 

Travel speed is a key predictor of traffic crashes and injury severity, and becomes even more important with age. A 30-year-old pedestrian hit at 40 mph has a 36% chance of dying, while a 70-year-old’s chance of death is nearly double that, at 70%. 

Speed is a leading contributor to traffic deaths in Portland and a focus of the city’s Vision Zero work to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. 

Since 2017, PBOT has: 

  • Lowered speed limits on residential streets to 20 mph and reduced speed limits on an additional 121 miles of street
  • Installed eight automated speed safety cameras at high crash locations and expects to install more cameras as soon as next year. 
  • Launched the citywide Struck campaign in 2018 and renewed the campaign for 2019. 

In addition to protecting pedestrians, focus areas for Vision Zero include designing streets to protect human lives and creating a culture of shared responsibility. PBOT's newly adopted PedPDX Plan describes additional tools and actions to improve pedestrian safety. 

This work will become even more critical as Portland grows older and more grandmas, grandpas, retirees, and other older adults share the city’s streets, requiring care and patience on the part of all travelers. 

 

Every intersection is a legal crosswalk

Under Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk, whether it is marked or unmarked. People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane.

The most common cause of crashes resulting in death or serious injury to people walking is when they are walking legally and struck by a person driving who fails to stop. People driving can do their part by having more patience, driving at or below the posted speed, continuously scanning the environment looking for people walking and bicycling, and being ready to stop as needed. PBOT reminds Portlanders to watch for people walking at all hours of the day or night, and that it is illegal to drive in the center turn lane.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Portland Police Bureau (PPB) will conduct a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action tomorrow, Wednesday, July 31, at the marked crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue, from noon to 1:30 p.m. to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws.

Education and enforcement actions such as the July 31 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to achieve Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating all traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for crossing streets in Oregon (in EnglishEspañol); and view the results of previous actions.

Portland is committed to ending traffic violence in our communities. Through the Vision Zero program, the City of Portland and our partners are working to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our streets.

To request a Vision Zero community briefing, enforcement action in your area, or any non-urgent traffic safety concerns, call the 823-SAFE Traffic Safety Hot Line at (503) 823-7233, or submit a non-urgent Traffic Safety Hot Line request at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/79389


Data details: 
The analysis includes all reported crashes that occurred within the City of Portland (including highways) from 2010 through July 30, 2019. Data from 2010 through 2017 is from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Data from 2018 through July 30, 2019, is preliminary data from the Portland Police Bureau. View more information about Portland crash data. 

PBOT News Advisory: Crosswalk education and enforcement action planned for E Burnside Street at E 16th Avenue on Wednesday, July 31

Raising awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws

Vision Zero Portland logo(July 29, 2019) – The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Portland Police Bureau (PPB) will conduct a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action on Wednesday, July 31, at the marked crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue, from noon to 1:30 p.m. to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws.

Under Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk, whether it is marked or unmarked. People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane. 

The crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue has a marked crosswalk, median island and signage.  In addition, “stop here” signage and stop lines indicate where drivers stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk, making all travelers more visible. Southeast 16th Avenue is a designated neighborhood greenway one block south, starting at SE Ankeny Street. The surrounding area includes businesses, residences and schools, with elementary, middle and high schools within a half mile. Buses for TriMet lines 12, 19, and 20 travel through this intersection and serve the surrounding community.

Changes are coming next year to the crossing at 16th Avenue. Improvements include rapid flashing beacons funded by the Fixing Our Streets (FOS) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program. Design is underway and scheduled for Fall 2020 completion. Other safety improvements along W/E Burnside can be found at PBOT’s Vision Zero webpage.

East Burnside, a Vision Zero designated high crash network street, had a total of 543 crashes, including two fatalities and 745 injuries from 2013 to 2017, the most recent five-year period for which data are available for the area from the Burnside Bridge to the city limits.

The most common cause of crashes resulting in death or serious injury to people walking is when they are walking legally and struck by a person driving who fails to stop. People driving can do their part by having more patience, driving at or below the posted speed, continuously scanning the environment looking for people walking and bicycling, and being ready to stop as needed. PBOT reminds Portlanders to watch for people walking at all hours of the day or night, and that it is illegal to drive in the center turn lane.

East Burnside at 16th Avenue

East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue (looking east). Image by Google.com

Education and enforcement actions such as the July 31 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to achieve Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating all traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Each crosswalk enforcement action involves a designated pedestrian crossing at a marked or unmarked crosswalk while police monitor whether people driving, bicycling and walking adhere to traffic safety laws. Drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk and pedestrians who fail to follow Oregon traffic laws may be issued a warning or citation. A PBOT staff member will serve as the designated pedestrian crossing the street during Wednesday’s action.

Crosswalk education and enforcement actions are an effective way to communicate traffic laws to people driving and walking. The transportation and police bureaus do education and enforcement actions in response to requests by community members, city traffic safety engineers, and Portland Police to educate the general public on the rules at marked and unmarked crossings.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for crossing streets in Oregon (in English; Español); and view the results of previous actions.

Portland is committed to ending traffic violence in our communities. Through the Vision Zero program, the City of Portland and our partners are working to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our streets.

To request a Vision Zero community briefing, enforcement action in your area, or any non-urgent traffic safety concerns, call the 823-SAFE Traffic Safety Hot Line at (503) 823-7233, or submit a non-urgent Traffic Safety Hot Line request at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/79389

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation