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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


PBOT News Release: Portland Sunday Parkways hits Outer East Portland this Sunday, in conjunction with Portland Parks & Recreation’s 2019 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants

A celebration of New Portlanders from across the globe

Smiling children who participated in the 2018 walk

Participants in the 2018 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants. Courtesy Ben Brink and Portland Parks & Recreation. 

(July 19, 2019) – Outer Northeast Sunday Parkways, the third event of the Sunday Parkways season, will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 21. This free, family-friendly event, organized by the Portland Bureau of Transportation and presented by Kaiser Permanente, is a great way to get the whole family out on a bike ride, walk or dance in a park.

The 4.8-mile, car-free route links four parks with live music, exercise classes, food and interactive performances and exhibits. Thousands of people come to each Sunday Parkways, where we open the city's largest public space - its streets - to show everyone how they can walk, bike, and roll, while fostering civic pride, stimulating economic development, and engaging community.

This Sunday's event welcomes the 2019 Walk with Immigrants & Refugees.

People at the 2018 Walk with immigrants

Participants in the 2018 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants. Courtesy Mick Hangland-Skill and Portland Parks & Recreation.

The third annual walk is presented by Portland Parks & Recreation's Parks for New Portlanders program, local nonprofits and refugee and immigrant organizations, and local elected leaders. The event celebrates the unique experiences of Portlanders of all ages and backgrounds. An estimated 5,000 people took part in the walk in 2018.

All are welcome to take part, to support and celebrate with everyone who calls the Rose City home. Speakers at the start and at the conclusion of the walk will include diverse community leaders sharing and reflecting on the experience of immigrants in the Portland area. Afterwards, enjoy delicious food, multicultural music, and family fun at Knott Park.

“In our current political climate, events like the walk on Sunday are vital for our entire community," said Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly. "The City of Portland will never tell refugees and immigrants to ‘go back where you came from’ because this is your home. Portland is a sanctuary city and Portlanders support, defend, and celebrate our refugee and immigrant communities.”

The walk starts at 11 a.m. at the East Portland Community Office, 1017 NE 117th Ave. and finishes at Knott Park, 1 mile away, at NE 117th Avenue and Knott Street.

Sunday Parkways is excited to continue its partnership with the Parks for New Portlanders (PNP) program to help connect immigrants and refugees with parks and community-building activities across the city.

For more information in English and several other languages, please visit the website for the walk.

children on bicycles

Children on bicycles cool off by riding under a water mister at Sunday Parkways in 2017 in Outer East Portland. Photo by Kevin Koch for PBOT.

 

Learn more about recent and upcoming improvements coming to the Gateway area of East Portland

Learn about a variety of new and upcoming transportation projects for the Gateway area at a PBOT open house at Gateway Discovery Park, at NE 106th Ave and Halsey, where staff will provide information, visuals and refreshments during Sunday Parkways

Sunday's event offers a great introduction to recently opened biking and walking amenities in the Gateway area. 

The route will cross the newly improved Halsey-Weidler corridor at NE 106th Avenue at the northeastern entrance to Gateway Discovery Park, which opened last summer.

Catch a bus or the MAX light rail to TriMet's Gateway Transit Center, where you can ride to NE Weidler Street, where PBOT recently completed new curb extensions and marked crosswalks, new rapid-flashing beacons and better lighting that make crossing the street a more comfortable experience throughout the business corridor. New, bright-green parking-protected bike lanes along Halsey and Weidler provide an extra buffer from vehicle travel lanes.

These improvements are just some of the numerous transportation projects underway or coming soon to the Gateway area this year:

 

The former 7-mile Outer East Sunday Parkways route has been shortened this year to 4.8 miles to make for a more walkable route and now includes John Luby Park and Hazelwood Hydro Park. This showcases a walkable and rollable network of streets connecting four parks in all: Knott City, John Luby, Hazelwood Hydro, and Gateway Discovery.

View the route map to plan your route to or through the Outer East Sunday Parkways, and see locations of restrooms and other resources.

View the brochure to learn about some of the activities planned at each park this Sunday.

For more information, visit www.PortlandSundayParkways.org or call 503-823-7599. Follow us on Facebook at PortlandSundayParkways,  Instagram @PortlandSundayParkways and on Twitter @Sunday Parkways.

 

Check the Sunday Parkways route map if you're traveling in the Gateway area on Sunday

Map of 2019 Outer East Sunday Parkways route

Logos of event sponsors

 

About Sunday Parkways

Sunday Parkways is a series of free community events opening the city's largest public space—its streets—for people to walk, bike, roll and discover active transportation. The events are beloved by Portlanders of all ages. Total attendance to date has been 789,035 over 40 Sunday Parkways events. Residents and visitors say they come to enjoy the traffic-free streets connecting parks and schools filled with activities, music and vendors. It’s safe, family-friendly and a chance to meet neighbors. Learn more at PortlandSundayParkways.com

About PBOT

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation 

 

Learn more about recent and upcoming improvements coming to the Gateway area of East Portland

News Blog: Central City in Motion bus and bike improvements to be showcased at July 23 open house

Six featured projects will make it easier to get around our growing central city

CCIM open house

(July 19, 2019) Thousands of bus and bike trips through the central city will soon be safer, easier, and more reliable thanks to transportation improvements coming this summer and fall.

Next Tuesday, July 23, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) will host an open house in Old Town to share information about these efforts. Members of the public are invited to stop by the White Stag building at 70 NW Couch St. anytime between 5-7 p.m. to meet with PBOT and TriMet staff, learn about projects nearing construction, and weigh in on projects going into design.

PBOT will be sharing data from the recently completed bus and bike lanes on SW Madison Street as well as discussing a new Business Access and Transit (BAT) lane on NW Everett Street scheduled for installation next month and a new dedicated bus lane on the Burnside Bridge coming this fall. The bureau will also share plans for improvements on NW Flanders Street, Naito Parkway, and SW Fourth Avenue. Open house attendees will also learn about PBOT’s current study focused on making transit better across the city.

Now is a great time to try leaving your car at home for your next downtown trip. Taking transit, biking, using a scooter, or walking and rolling as a pedestrian are all great ways to save money, help decrease congestion, and reduce our individual impact on climate change. PBOT, TriMet, and Portland’s bike-share program BIKETOWN will all be giving out discounts and gear to help get you started.

Many of the projects featured at the open house were identified through the Central City in Motion plan. Central City in Motion is PBOT’s guide for investing in our streets to create a smart, future-focused transportation system in the central city. These investments aim to make the entire system work better and provide more predictable travel times for businesses and residents.

NW Everett rendering

In August 2019, a new business access and transit (BAT) lane will replace one of the existing travel lanes on NW Everett Street and run from NW Broadway to the Steel Bridge ramp. The ramp from southbound NW Naito Parkway to the Steel Bridge will close. This will improve transit reliability and access to the Rose Quarter, benefitting Portlanders who ride TriMet lines 4, 8, 16, 35, 44, and 77.

The July 23 open house will focus on projects slated for construction from 2019 to 2021, including:

 

Click here to RSVP on Facebook

Refreshments and activities for kids will be provided. For questions about the event, email Gabe Graff at gabriel.graff@portlandoregon.gov or call 503-823-5291.

News Release: Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, PBOT Director Chris Warner, Prosper Portland Director Kimberly Branam and Gateway community members cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project

cutting the ribbon

Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, Transportation Director Chris Warner, Prosper Portland Executive Director Kimberly Branam cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project with Gateway community members. Photo by Sarah Petersen, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Fixing Our Streets Logo

(July 18, 2019) Members of the Gateway community, the city’s Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) Director Chris Warner, and Prosper Portland Executive Director Kimberly Branam gathered today to cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project and celebrate the transformation of the Gateway Regional Center’s retail core.

The Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project has brought to life a vision first outlined in the Opportunity Gateway Concept Plan, approved by city council back in early 2000. The plan envisioned a future for the Regional Center in these terms:

Groups of people can be seen moving in and out of buildings, sitting in outside cafés, jogging on streets, and celebrating community events at the Gateway Station Plaza. Day and night, the area buzzes with activity. Cars still stream through the area, actually in greater numbers than before. Yet ironically it doesn’t feel that way. On-street parking buffers pedestrians from street traffic, new street connections have dispersed cars, traffic lights are coordinated, and accidents have been reduced by 90%. The traffic level feels safe and under control.

The Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project has now made this vision a reality, through a joint project with Prosper Portland and by coordinating several other PBOT projects in the neighborhood.

Before and After: 111th and Weidler

Before and after: Waiting for the bus and taking a bike ride along NE Weidler Street at 111th Avenue is a completely different experience following the completion of the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project. Photos by Google Streetview (left) and Pierre Haou, Portland Bureau of Transportation (right).

New curb extensions and marked crosswalks, new rapid-flashing beacons and better lighting already make crossing the street a more comfortable experience throughout the business corridor. The new, bright-green parking-protected bike lanes along Halsey and Weidler provide an extra buffer from vehicle travel lanes. And we’ve added more on-street parking.

PBOT crews installed new streetlights with their own unique design and made the sidewalks wider to make more room for benches, bicycle racks, trash cans, and other street furniture. And they turned NE 103rd Avenue between NE Halsey and Clackamas streets into a “festival street” that can be closed to traffic for community events and which serves as a bookend to the corridor’s west entrance.

106th and Halsey

Pedestrians cross at the new rapid flashing beacon at NE 106th and Halsey. Photo by Pierre Haou, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Today, Gateway neighbors gathered to celebrate at the eastern end of the corridor, the second bookend known as the “East Entry Triangle,” a new public plaza bordered by NE 112th Avenue, Halsey and Weidler that formerly sat vacant.

“These streets belong to all of us, and everyone has the right to feel safe whether they are walking, biking, or rolling on them,” said Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly. “I am so pleased that not only does the Halsey Weidler Streetscape Plan bring safety to the forefront with improved pedestrian crossings and reduced speeds, it creates a new public plaza, and will help local businesses in the Gateway District.”

“Get ready, Gateway! This Sunday, over 20,000 people will bike, walk, and roll through this neighborhood for the Outer Northeast Sunday Parkways,” said Transportation Director Chris Warner. “It’s going to be fun to see so many people experience what we already know and love about the Gateway neighborhood – it’s diverse community, it’s charming business district, and – now - it’s fantastic sidewalks, public plazas, bike lanes, and neighborhood greenways.”

“The completion of the Halsey Weidler Streetscape Project marks a milestone in Prosper Portland’s strategic goals to pursue transportation improvements in East Portland that contribute to job growth, increase connectivity, and complement the Gateway Action Plan,” said Kimberly Branam, Executive Director of Prosper Portland.

“Our children enjoy riding their bikes to the new Gateway Discovery Park and now we can ride safely to Gateway Green as a family, thanks to our new bicycle lanes and greenways,” said Lisa Ortquist, a neighborhood resident and mother of three children aged 10 to 24 who has owned her business, Ortquist & Associates, PC, at NE 112th Avenue and Halsey Street for the past 20 years. “And on days when there’s no school, my kids can now safely walk to get breakfast, ice cream and treats at the neighborhood shops.”

People attending Outer Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways this weekend will get to walk or ride a new 4.8 mile route featuring the WALK with Refugees and Immigrants. The new route will cross the newly improved Halsey-Weidler corridor at NE 106th Avenue at the northeastern entrance to Gateway Discovery Park which opened last summer.

These improvements are just some of the numerous transportation projects underway or coming soon to the Gateway area this year:

The $5.5 million Halsey-Weidler Streetscape project was funded by PBOT’s Fixing Our Streets program, Prosper Portland, transportation system development charges, and the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services’s “% for Green” program.

Learn more about Fixing Our Streets by using our interactive map of projects at http://map.fixingourstreets.com.

Additional information about transportation projects coming to the Gateway community and East Portland can be found at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/east.

Traffic Advisory: Paving on SE Harold Street from SE 111th to 136th avenues begins tomorrow

(July 17, 2019) – Street improvements on SE Harold Street from SE 111th Avenue to SE 136th Avenue start tomorrow, Thursday, July 18 and will continue through August 2 from 7 a.m. through 4 p.m. each business day - and possibly weekends – with periodic lane closures during that time.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave 2.82 lane miles of pavement to create a new, smoother street for travel.

grind and pave screen shot

How do crews with the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) repave a street? In this short video, PBOT crew members explain how they grind and pave our city streets to create new, smooth roads for you: https://youtu.be/f9tyo3NyLJ0

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

Please avoid the area if possible and expect delays as we repair this section of road. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane detours and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

This work is weather-dependent, and the schedule may change.

News Release: Safety improvements coming to Portland’s fourth most dangerous street

The East Glisan Street Update project begins Monday

Before and after renderings (looking west) of the new intersection being installed at NE 128th and Glisan Street.

Before and after renderings (looking west) of the new intersection being installed at NE 128th and Glisan Street. These improvements will make it easier for Menlo Park Elementary School families to get to school and easier for pedestrians and people biking to cross from the new 130s Neighborhood Greenway.

(July 17, 2019) Work begins next week on NE Glisan Street between 122nd and 148th avenues to increase safety for pedestrians, people biking, and people driving along this High Crash Network street. This is the first of three segments of improvements planned for NE Glisan Street, with additional work between NE 148th and 162nd avenues scheduled this August. Additional safety improvements between NE 102nd and 122nd avenues are scheduled for installation next year. 

NE Glisan Street is the fourth most dangerous street in Portland for people traveling in motor vehicles and the ninth most dangerous street for pedestrians. In the last decade, five people have died on NE Glisan Street between I-205 and NE 162nd Avenue: Three people in cars and two pedestrians. From 2006 to 2015, 46 people suffered serious injuries while travelling on this same stretch of road. Of these serious injuries, 41 were sustained by people in cars, two were people biking, and three were pedestrians.

A single-driver crash that occurred at 6:50 p.m. on April 25, 2019 at NE 103rd Avenue and Glisan Street

A single-driver crash that occurred at 6:50 p.m. on April 25, 2019 at NE 103rd Avenue and Glisan Street. The crash caused power to go out at over 3,600 households. Hundreds of drivers were detoured onto local streets while NE Glisan Street was closed for hours between 102nd and 104th avenues. (Photo courtesy of a Glisan Street neighbor.)

Highway-style streets like NE Glisan Street divide neighborhoods and make it nerve-wracking for kids to walk or bike to school, or families to walk to parks or the store. Long stretches of road between signals mean people drive too fast, making it unsafe, and sometimes deadly, to cross the street.

Rendering of NE Glisan Street at 125th Avenue, looking west.

Rendering of NE Glisan Street at 125th Avenue, looking west. There will be no changes to the number of lanes within three blocks of major intersections in order to keep a left turn lane and two through lanes adjacent to these major intersections.

To address the most dangerous parts of NE Glisan Street, the street will be updated into three lanes from NE 106th to 119th, from 125th to 145th, and from 150th to 160th avenues. A signalized bicycle and pedestrian crossing will be installed at NE 128th Avenue as part of the 130s Neighborhood Greenway, a new north-south route for biking and walking. The number of lanes will remain the same within three blocks of major intersections to keep a left-turn lane and two through lanes open in each direction. Between NE 102nd and 122nd avenues, Glisan Street will also feature a buffered bike lane (eastbound) and a parking-protected bike lane (westbound). Parking-protected bike lanes will be installed in both directions from NE 122nd Avenue to the eastern city limit at NE 162nd Avenue.

PBOT crews will be begin work on NE Glisan Street between NE 122nd and 148th avenues starting July 22 and continuing through late August. Our crews work from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. All vehicle travel lanes will stay open at major intersections along NE Glisan Street from 7 to 9 a.m. and from 3 to 6 p.m. Pedestrian and bicycle access will stay open at all hours, along with access to side streets. Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

The aim of the East Glisan Street Update is to achieve the goals articulated by the community and Portland City Council to improve safety, provide more transportation options, and improve access to jobs, parks, libraries, transit, and more. Some of the safety goals outlined in the project include: reducing top-end speeding (more than 10 mph over the speed limit); reducing the severity of crashes in support of Portland’s Vision Zero mission to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries; making it easier and safer for neighbors to cross the street and connect to public transit; and making it clearer where pedestrians, people biking, and people driving are supposed to be so the road is safer for everyone. To see more details of the project, including photographs and renderings, see this interactive story map and project evaluation guide.

A crash at 6:55 a.m. on May 21, 2019 that required police and medical response.

A crash at 6:55 a.m. on May 21, 2019 that required police and medical response. One person was transported to the hospital for injuries sustained in the crash. (Photo courtesy of a Glisan Street neighbor.)

For too long, East Portlanders have borne the brunt of the city’s traffic violence. East Portlanders are at greater risk to be injured or killed in a traffic crash and disproportionately represented in the city’s crash data. A pedestrian in East Portland is 2.3 times more likely to be hit by a motor vehicle than a pedestrian in more central Portland neighborhoods. This is due to East Portland’s wide streets that have historically prioritized the speed of motor vehicles above everything else, including safety. PBOT’s Vision Zero mission has put motor vehicle speed within the context of larger community goals related to traffic safety, more transportation options, and better access to opportunity.

PBOT would like to acknowledge and thank the community partners who championed these safety improvements to NE Glisan Street. East Portland neighbors involved in the East Portland Action Plan and East Portland In Motion have for years highlighted the need and urgency for safer access to public transit, and biking and walking routes.

The total estimated cost for improvements to NE Glisan Street east of NE 122nd Avenue is $400,000.  Funding for this portion of the project comes from federal highway funds administered through Metro and the Oregon Department of Transportation. PBOT applied for these grant funds after East Portland residents prioritized and articulated their goals so clearly through East Portland In Motion. Additional funding comes from PBOT's transportation system development charges and Portland’s cannabis tax.  

Vision Zero Portland logo

For more information about the East Glisan Street Update, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/eastglisan.

Learn more about Portland’s Vision Zero mission at www.visionzeroportland.com