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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


Traffic Advisory: Construction activities clean-up on SW Capitol Highway this week

Construction will take place Wednesday, Oct. 23 – Sunday, Oct. 27

(Oct. 22, 2019) Summer went by too fast! Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) contracted crews didn’t quite complete the Capitol Highway Paving Project before the rainy season, and so are cleaning up and hibernating for the winter. There will be no sign of construction. The road will be open and driveable. Access to businesses will be returned to normal.

To prevent flooding and improve safety, PBOT-contracted crews will clean up the construction area at SW Capitol Highway and 35th Avenue. Crews will complete work by Sunday, Oct. 27.

To prepare for winter, crews will be removing steel plates from the roadway to finish paving excavated areas, installing permanent stop signs, and installing temporary crosswalk markings.

Streets and sidewalks will remain open Construction activities will not require detours. Flaggers will be on-site to manage traffic. Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

 

Open during construction!

Multnomah Village is open for business during construction! Join PBOT to celebrate the project’s season closing on Thursday, Oct. 31 for Halloween in the Village.

Why is work being extended to 2020?

PBOT-contracted crews met unanticipated construction challenges this summer which required additional time to address, including sinkholes in the road base at SW 35th Avenue.

When will the work be complete?

PBOT will share additional updates and an anticipated 2020 construction schedule by February 2020 and will coordinate with businesses to minimize construction impacts.

Thanks for your continued patience while we make SW Capitol Highway a smoother, safer and more accessible street for all.

This work is weather-dependent, and the schedule may change.

Traffic Advisory: Emergency sinkhole repairs on SW Barbur Boulevard between Hooker and Sheridan streets

(Oct. 17, 2019) – Sinkholes discovered in a northbound lane of SW Barbur Boulevard between Hooker and Sheridan streets will require emergency repairs and lane closures by Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) crews beginning tomorrow, Oct. 18 from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. to address immediate safety concerns. Repair work will continue on Tuesday, Oct. 22 through Thursday, Oct. 24 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day. 

Please avoid the area if possible and expect delays as we repair this section of road. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane detours and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

Traffic Advisory: A smoother street is coming to SE Flavel Street from 112th Avenue to Deardorff Road

(Oct. 16, 2019) – Street improvements on SE Flavel Street from 112th Avenue to Deardorff Road begin tomorrow, Oct. 17 through Oct. 23 from 7 a.m. through 4 p.m. each business day - and possibly weekends.

Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) crews will be grinding down and repaving sections of the road that have been compromised by potholes.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

Please avoid the area if possible and expect delays as we repair this section of road. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane detours and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

Learn what you can expect in our work zones and how you can help everyone stay safe by watching this video: https://youtu.be/lx3RkJjkjSE

How do PBOT crews repave a street? In this short video, PBOT crew members explain how they grind and pave our city streets to create new, smooth roads for you: https://youtu.be/f9tyo3NyLJ0

grind and pave screen shot

This work is weather-dependent, and the schedule may change.

News Blog: A new directive for Portland's crosswalks

PBOT crews have begun installing new high-visibility crosswalks to heighten safety and visibility for pedestrians

SW Third Avenue and W Burnside Street

An example of an older style crosswalk that has been restriped with a high-visibility crosswalk at SW Third Avenue and W Burnside Street. Photo by PBOT.

Vision Zero Portland logo

(Oct. 15, 2019) Throughout Portland, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is installing new high-visibility crosswalks to heighten safety and visibility for pedestrians.

With a new directive from the city’s traffic engineer, these high-visibility markings are the new standard for marked crossings in Portland. This is one of the first actions PBOT has taken since Portland City Council adopted a new pedestrian master plan, known as PedPDX, this past June.

What are high-visibility crosswalks and how are they different?

High-visibility crosswalks (sometimes called “continental-style” crosswalks) have thick lines parallel to traffic flow that allow drivers to see the crosswalk from further away. This gives drivers more time to stop safely for pedestrians crossing, or waiting to cross.

As new crosswalks are installed or reinstalled by PBOT crews and contractors, they will include these new high-visibility markings. Where an existing crosswalk already exists, such as the type with two white lines perpendicular to traffic, you will see PBOT adding high-visibility markings into the existing striping.

A high-visibility crosswalk at SE 30th Avenue and Hawthorne Boulevard

An example of an older style crosswalk that has been restriped with a high-visibility crosswalk at SE 30th Avenue and Hawthorne Boulevard. New left turn calming rubber speed bumps were also added as part of PBOT's Vision Zero left turn calming pilot. Photo by PBOT.

Why the focus on crossings?

ped crashes at signals

The data collected for PedPDX found that over 40% of pedestrian crashes and 30% of severe and fatal crashes citywide occur at intersections with traffic signals. Over a quarter of all crashes involve a turning driver failing to yield when the pedestrian has the right of way.   

Adding high-visibility crosswalks at intersections with traffic signals may help make pedestrians more visible to people driving. PBOT will install these high-visibility crosswalks at intersections with traffic signals and all other marked crossings moving forward. This data-driven approach to solving traffic safety issues is a core tenet of Vision Zero.

You can find more information about PedPDX online at www.pedpdx.com.

Learn more about Vision Zero online at www.visionzeroportland.com

Update on North Going Street Bridge repairs

Map of Going St Bridge

Fourth lane potentially in several months

News media contact:

Dylan Rivera
Portland Bureau of Transportation
503-823-3723
dylan.rivera@portlandoregon.gov
@PBOTinfo

(Oct. 14, 2019) The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) continues to work on short-term and long-term fixes to restore access for travel on the North Going Street Bridge, which provides access to the Swan Island industrial area.

The Portland City Council gave emergency approval on Sept. 25 for a contract of up to $1 million with Cascade Bridge LLC to provide bridge stabilization and repair work, including permanent repairs.

City Council members and the public have been asking about who would pay to repair the City's bridge, from the damage caused by the Union Pacific Railroad derailment Sept. 7.

The City’s Risk Management team will seek to recover from Union Pacific all reasonable and necessary costs associated with the damage to the City’s transportation infrastructure, as well as other costs related to the incident and the resulting disruptions.

Fourth lane coming soon

PBOT engineers and contractors are planning on how they can open a fourth lane on the bridge, which would allow two lanes on and off the island in each direction at all times. PBOT is working with Union Pacific to schedule times when the railroad can be shut down to allow access for bridge repairs.

PBOT has submitted a variety of work plans and schedules that could complete the work. PBOT's contractor has agreed to work at night to expedite opening a fourth lane, and while we are hoping to have the lane open as soon as possible, it could take several months because of limited access to the work zone beneath the bridge.

PBOT has also submitted a work plan that could open a fourth lane in a matter of weeks. Union Pacific is reviewing that plan.

Traffic signal adjusted for eastbound traffic congestion

People who work on Swan Island say that traffic congestion leaving the island continues to be a significant disruption. In the days after the Sept. 7 derailment, crews adjusted traffic signals. Last week, PBOT traffic engineers also adjusted the traffic signal at the intersection of N Going Street and N Port Center Way, the last signal travelers reach before they enter the bridge. The adjustments increased the "green time" for eastbound traffic by more than 30 percent, giving more time for eastbound travelers.

After the adjustment, PBOT staff measured the time it takes to travel from where the N Anchor Street ramp enters N Channel Avenue, to the point where N Channel Avenue passes under the N Greeley Avenue Bridge. At 11 a.m., without traffic congestion, the average travel time was 1 minute and 7 seconds.

Using the worst set of travel times, the average peak travel time was about 4 minutes longer than non-peak.  We did have one trip that was an increase of almost 9 minutes longer, for a trip of about 10 minutes long.

PBOT engineers will continue to look for ways to reduce traffic delays during the lane closures.

Return to six lanes potentially this spring

Planning for permanent repairs to the bridge, including planning for access to Union Pacific's property during construction, is on-going. Permanent repairs would return the bridge to its full three lanes each direction.

Permanent repairs, which would open six total lanes, could potentially be completed this spring.

Reversible lane too risky, unsafe

Initial repairs by PBOT crews made the bridge safe enough that the bureau was able to open a third travel lane on Sunday Sept. 15, allowing two lanes for westbound travel to Swan Island, with one lane available for eastbound travel. People who work on Swan Island say that traffic congestion leaving the island continues to be a significant disruption.

PBOT traffic engineers studied the feasibility of reversing the direction of one of the two westbound travel lanes, to offer two lanes eastbound direction, coming off the island, in the afternoon and evening. That option was determined to be unsafe. To use a concrete barrier to separate traffic would require obtaining specialized machinery that is not available in the region. Using cones and other plastic materials would pose safety risks as those materials could be displaced or blown over by traffic, blocking travel lanes. Moving plastic materials twice a day also exposes city crews or contractors to safety risks during the most hazardous time of a road closure: the time when they make adjustments to the equipment at the scene.

Work starting soon on N Greeley Avenue will close a northbound lane

The team working on the North Going Street Bridge has been coordinating with another PBOT team and a contractor that is starting work on repaving North Greeley Avenue. The North Greeley Multiuse Path and Paving Project will soon require closing one lane northbound on Greeley, at a location closest to N Interstate Avenue and far enough away that it should not impact traffic entering the North Going Street Bridge. Lean more at this North Greeley project update. 

Stay tuned for further updates

We will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available.

 

Sign up here for email or text message updates about the repairs to the North Going Street Bridge and access to Swan Island

 

 

Sign up to receive PBOT's citywide traffic advisories by email or text message, and monitor our Twitter account @PBOTinfo for breaking news and alerts

 

 

For more information:

Dan Layden
Project Manager
dan.layden@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-2804

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation