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Historic Resources Code Project holds second public roundtable

Participants discussed the purpose of a citywide Historic Resource Inventory and identified opportunities to encourage rehabilitation and reuse.

Example of Italianate-style architecture

The venue for the January 11 roundtable, the 1883 West Block, was included in the 1984 Historic Resource Inventory for its Italianate-style architecture.

On Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability held a second community roundtable for the Historic Resources Code Project (HRCP) at the Architectural Heritage Center in the East Portland/Grand Avenue Historic District. The event sought public input on “inventorying and adapting historic resources,” asking the approximately 40 participants to share perspectives on how best the City might identify and evaluate potentially significant historic resources and encourage the rehabilitation and reuse of significant historic resources through the zoning code. Topics discussed in participant breakout sessions included:

  • Expanding the Historic Resource Inventory to include more diverse types of historic resources.
  • The tension between having a Historic Resources Inventory that is too broad or too narrow.
  • The opportunities and challenges of soliciting crowdsourced information on historic resources.
  • Parking and use flexibility for designated historic resources.
  • Opportunities to increase market-rate and affordable housing production in conjunction with historic preservation.

Read a summary of the event for more information.

The suggestions and insights collected at the January 11 event will inform zoning code concepts developed by the Bureau of Planning and sustainability over the next several months. The next roundtable, “What’s Working and What’s Not in Portland’s Historic Districts,” will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018, at Taborspace. If you are unable to attend an upcoming roundtable session, please consider taking the project’s online survey.

For more information about the HRCP, visit the project website or contact project manager Brandon Spencer-Hartle at historic.resources@portlandoregon.gov. Interested parties are also encouraged to join the historic resources program email list for project updates, including information about future opportunities for public involvement.

picture of McDonalds from 1963

Few properties east of 82nd Avenue were included in the 1984 Historic Resource Inventory. This 1963 McDonald’s, located at 9100 SE Powell Blvd, was used as a conversation starter for discussions related to updating the Inventory.

Resolve to redeem in 2018

Redeem more containers!

Beginning Jan. 1, 2018, more types of beverage containers started carrying a 10-cent deposit. These include bottles and cans for tea, coffee, fruit juice, coconut water, hard cider and kombucha. Beer, soft drinks and water containers continue to be accepted at some grocery stores and BottleDrop Centers.

Not accepted: Wine, liquor, dairy or plant-based milk, infant formula and metal cans that require a can opener.

Other changes to the statewide Bottle Bill took place in April 1, 2017. That’s when consumers started getting a dime back for carbonated beverages and water containers recycled at a return center.

When Oregonians take bottles separately to be redeemed, they make it easier for our local recyclers to turn them into something new. Many of these containers are recycled right in our region.

Portland residents can redeem beverage containers by taking containers to a local retailer or to a BottleDrop Redemption Center for money. As always, bottles and cans can still be set out for curbside collection without collecting that dime. At curbside, recycle aluminum and plastic beverage bottles in your blue recycling roll cart and glass bottles in your yellow recycling bin.

Find a BottleDrop location near you at www.bottledropcenters.com.

Historic Resources Code Project holds first public roundtable

Participants prioritized values of historic preservation in anticipation of next gathering on January 11.

Attendees at roundtable

On Dec. 7, 2017, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability held a kick-off event for the Historic Resources Code Project (HRCP) at the White Stag Block, an adaptively reused building in the Skidmore/Old Town Historic District.

The first of four community roundtables, the event asked participants to identify and describe the value and purpose of historic preservation in Portland. Approximately fifty Portlanders convened to share their opinions on the community value of historic resources, with conversation topics spanning the cultural, social, economic, environmental, aesthetic, and educational outcomes of preserving historic resources. A summary of the event is available as a PDF.

Group ideas from the roundtable   Group ideas from the roundtable

The benefits and values identified at the December 7th roundtable will inform the code project’s future input sessions, the next of which will address technical code concepts related to the identification, designation, and protection of historic resources. The next roundtable, “New Tools for Inventorying and Adapting Historic Resources,” will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, at the Architectural Heritage Center (701 SE Grand Ave.). If you are unable to attend an upcoming roundtable session, consider submitting a public comment form online.

For more information about the HRCP, visit the project website or contact project manager Brandon Spencer-Hartle at historic.resources@portlandoregon.gov. Interested parties are also invited to join the historic resources program email list for project updates, including information about future roundtables.

PSC News: January 9, 2018 Meeting Recap

R/W #7890, R/W #8446, R/W #8250 street vacation requests — Consent Agenda; PSC Vote for Officers — Decision; Haulers’ Franchise Review — Briefing; Code Reconciliation Project — Work Session / Recommendation

Agenda

  • R/W #7890, R/W #8446, R/W #8250 street vacation requests — Consent
  • PSC Vote for Officers — Decision
  • Haulers’ Franchise Review — Briefing
  • Code Reconciliation Project — Work Session / Recommendation

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

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The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

Appeals are filed against Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan

The state Land Conservation and Development Commission will likely hear the appeals in March 2018.

The life of a new comprehensive plan in Oregon is complicated. Even after it is adopted by city leaders, it still must go through several rounds of review, checks and balances before it goes into effect.

Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan was adopted by City Council in June 2016. After that, city planners sent the new plan to the state for acknowledgement. While being considered by the state, community members who participated in the local decision-making process had a period in which they could file an objection to the plan with the Department of Land Conversation and Development (DLCD).

Several objections were filed against the plan earlier this year, but DLCD rejected them all in a recent order. The Multnomah Neighborhood Association and one other individual subsequently filed appeals of that DLCD decision with the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC).

Multnomah’s appeal cites objections to the mixed-use zoning in Multnomah Village, and the “middle housing” policy adopted with the new plan. In October, the City published draft proposals to implement the new policy through the Residential Infill Project.

The other appeal concerns the zoning designation of a property in the Arnold Creek area. 

LCDC to hear the appeals in March

The LCDC will likely consider the appeals at their scheduled March 2018 meeting in Salem. State officials would then prepare a written order implementing the Commission’s decision, which could take several months. The City Council recently delayed the effective date of the adopted plan until May 24, 2018, to allow time for that order to be issued. The LCDC decision may be appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

The 2035 Comprehensive Plan includes new land use policies, land use maps and zoning, and new public facilities plans. A positive ruling from LCDC would solidify the planned May 24 effective date.