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The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

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Thanks for all you do, Portland!

For years, we have worked together to make our city healthier, more livable and vibrant.

Families playing in public fountain

For years, Portland residents, businesses and local leaders have worked together to make our city healthier, more livable and vibrant.

Together, we have:

Cut carbon emissions by 41 percent per person (since 1990)!

Increased compost and recycling from 46 percent to almost 70 percent over the past five years.

Enhanced the livability of our neighborhoods by supporting local businesses and growing neighborhood centers.

Decreased our reliance on gasoline by 29 percent per person (since 1990). About 6 percent of Portlanders bike to work and transit ridership has doubled!

Doubled the number of farmers markets and community-supported agriculture farms (CSAs) serving Portland in the past eight years.

Installed more than 5,600 solar systems.

A better future. A better now.

Energy reporting increases transparency in the commercial real-estate market

Energy efficiency information for more than 800 commercial buildings is now available in an online map

The public can view and compare energy efficiency information for more than 800 commercial buildings within the city of Portland. Similar to labels on consumer products, such as cars and appliances, building energy ratings help tenants and prospective purchasers understand how much energy a building uses and how that might affect operating costs.

map of energy efficient buildings

In 2015, the City of Portland passed an ordinance requiring buildings that are 20,000 square feet and larger to track and report energy performance. Buildings are the single largest contributor to carbon emissions in Multnomah County, making them a critical area of focus in the City's efforts to combat climate change. Existing commercial buildings have shown little improvement in energy efficiency over the past three decades.

Across the nation, cities are addressing this problem through mandatory energy reporting and disclosure requirements. Building managers enter energy usage information and building details into ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager®, a free online tool that calculates metrics describing how the building performs. Tracking this information is the most common first step for a building owner in considering whether to make operational adjustments or building upgrades that could ultimately result in cost savings and carbon emissions reductions.

Building managers report their energy performance metrics to the City annually and that information is then made publicly available. The data reported in 2017 has been published and can be explored in an easy-to-use, interactive online map. Users can view and compare buildings according to their size, use type, energy performance, compliance status and whether the building’s score has been verified by professional. The same information can also be viewed in a sortable spreadsheet.

In addition, each year the City analyzes the data and publishes an annual report summarizing broader trends in energy performance. The analysis examines how buildings of different uses and ages perform compared to their peers and how energy performance has changed over time.

Online interactive Building Energy Map: www.portlandmaps.com/bps/buildingenergy

List of 2017 verified top performing buildings: www.portlandmaps.com/bps/buildingenergy/#/list

Energy Performance Reporting program website: www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/energyreporting

 

Plan your meal with the Guest-imator

In a time of excess, too much turkey is being tossed

Plan ahead for holiday meals – way ahead in fact – to decrease your chances of wasting good food. Tips for ways to save food abound for a reason. In a time of excess, too much turkey is being tossed.

photo of squash

According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, Americans throw away about 204 million pounds of turkey meat after Thanksgiving. That number doesn’t even include other leftover foods like side dishes and desserts.

Check out the Guest-imator!

Save the Food offers cooks and eaters alike options for food-and-money saving tips. The latest tool is the Guest-imator, a dinner party calculator that estimates how much food you need to keep your guests full and happy. What a concept!

photo of carrots

Visit a local farmers’ market

There are some farmers’ markets open year-round and even more open for Thanksgiving, so it’s a great time to get back out to the market. The farmers market map allows shoppers to find a market based on the neighborhood and the day they want to shop.

Choose from a wide variety of seasonal food that tastes fresh and looks beautiful on your plate, including apples, pears, cranberries, winter squash, hazelnuts, walnuts, chard, kale, leeks, beets and potatoes.

Don’t be afraid to try some creative uses for leftovers either. Leftover turkey curry or turkey breakfast tacos, anyone?

photo of cranberries

Compost what can’t be used

And when you’ve gotten everything out of your meal, add the turkey bones and any other food left to your kitchen compost container or directly in your green Portland Composts! roll cart. Get a detailed list of what goes in the green compost roll cart.

Take Energy Savings One Step Further

Home energy saving resources.

The Citywide Green Team has put together a list of free resources to help you save energy and money at home. Find the one that’s best for you, set yourself a deadline and get going. We’d like to hear from you. 

Top five ways to take your energy savings home

Now that you are turning off your computer when not in use, it’s time to think about energy saving actions to take at home. The Citywide Green Team has put together a list of free resources to help you save energy and money at home:

  1. Take five minutes to complete an online Home Energy Review. Take Energy Trust of Oregon’s online survey and get a free home energy review in just a few minutes.
  2. Find a friend and spend an hour or two finding phantom energy loads at home. Turn energy savings into a ghost buster challenge at home by checking out a Kill-A-Watt tester from a Multnomah County library. It’s a DIY project that gives you the power to find and destroy phantom energy loads at home. 
  3. Take a Saturday to attend a Fix-It-Fair to learn simple ways to save money on home energy projects and much more.
  4. Make the call and get a free consult with a home advisor from Community Energy Project. As a non-profit, CEP Home Advisors offer an objective, unbiased approach to making your home upgrade the best that it can.
  5. For the ultimate DIYer, use this tool to create a very detailed energy audit of your home. Seattle has put together this comprehensive home energy audit kit.

For the ultimate DIYer, use this tool to create a very detailed energy audit of your home. Seattle has put together this comprehensive home energy audit kit.