Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Planning and Sustainability

Innovation. Collaboration. Practical Solutions.

Phone: 503-823-7700

Curbside Hotline: 503-823-7202

1900 SW 4th Ave, Suite 7100, Portland, OR 97201

More Contact Info

Subscribe to RSS feed

Most Recent

View Less

PSC News: January 22, 2019 Meeting Information and Documents

Historic Code Update Project — Briefing; Bike Parking Code – Hearing

Agenda

  • Historic Code Update Project – Briefing
  • Bike Parking Code – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

BPS is looking for a new City Hall Garden Manager

Manage the Better Together Garden at City Hall

The City of Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is filling a part-time position to manage the Better Together Garden at Portland City Hall. The Better Together Garden was created in 2009 as a demonstration garden to inspire Portlanders to grow their own food and to donate their surplus to those lacking access to nutritious produce.

  

About the position

The City Hall Garden Manager will oversee operations of the Better Together Garden at Portland City Hall. This part-time position will have full responsibility in planning crop rotation; procuring seeds, starts, and tools; planting; weeding; maintaining infrastructure; coordinating with other bureaus as needed; harvesting and donating produce; interacting with members of the public; and performing other tasks to keep the garden productive and attractive throughout the year. This position has full authority and discretion over caring for the garden and works largely unsupervised, though the supervisor will assist the gardener in securing reimbursements and other logistical matters. General upkeep of the garden will comprise approximately 60 percent of this position’s time. 

This position will also work with nonprofit service providers to continue and further develop programming that could include produce donation, career training experiences, educational activities, and other programs with youth experiencing homelessness and other populations as the gardener and nonprofit partners see fit. The gardener will harvest and donate produce to nonprofit partners as well as plan and lead workdays with clients. Programming with nonprofit service providers will comprise approximately 30 percent of this position’s time, and planning and program development with the supervisor and nonprofit partners will comprise approximately 10 percent of this position’s time. 

About the Bureau

The Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) develops creative and practical solutions to enhance Portland's livability, preserve distinctive places and plan for a resilient future. We are committed to advancing equity as a means of achieving prosperous, healthy, resilient communities. BPS values a diverse workforce and seeks ways to promote equity and inclusion within the organization. BPS encourages candidates with knowledge, ability and experience working with a broad range of individuals and diverse communities to apply.

To learn more, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/

Compensation

This is a casual, part-time position with the City of Portland and is budgeted for an average 3 hours per week, with seasonal fluctuation, at $18 per hour. This position includes a stipend for materials, tools, and other job-related purchases. Casual appointments are not benefits-eligible.

How to apply

Please send a resume and cover letter that includes your relevant experience, qualifications, and interest to love.jonson@portlandoregon.gov by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, January 17, 2019. You will be contacted thereafter to notify you whether or not you have been selected for an interview.

Candidates with experience working with people from a variety of different social, cultural, and economic backgrounds should include that information in their application materials. Although not required, BPS encourages candidates that can fluently speak more than one language to include that information in your application materials.

If you are requesting Veteran's Preference, attach a copy of your DD214/DD215 and/or Veteran's Administration Letter stating your disability by e-mail along with your resume and cover letter. You must request Veteran's Preference AND include a copy of your documentation by the closing date listed above. Non-citizen applicants must be authorized to work in the United States at time of application.

It is the policy of the City of Portland that no person shall be discriminated against based on race, religion, color, sex, marital status, family status, national origin, age, mental or physical disability, protected veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or source of income. The City values diversity and encourages everyone who is interested in employment with the City to apply. If you wish to identify yourself as an individual with a disability under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and will be requesting accommodation, the requests must be made no later than the closing date of this announcement

Draft report for the 82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development ready for public review

Planners look at the potential for new commercial and mixed use development along this major north/south corridor on the east side of Portland

The draft report for the 82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development and its related appendices are now available for public review. The study focuses on the challenges of and exploring opportunities for new development in the corridor alongside potential transportation improvements.

The 82nd Avenue Study looks at the development potential of properties along 82nd Avenue and identifies barriers that can be addressed in the near-term, with an eye toward long-term solutions.

Project goals

This study will:

  • Identify the most strategic locations for public action or investment support for businesses and property development on 82nd Avenue.
  • Generate policy recommendations to address physical and social needs in the corridor, and address barriers to development while managing equity and social issues.
  • Update our understanding of 82nd Avenue as a “Civic Corridor.”

A corridor is defined in Portland's new 2035 Comp Plan as: An area that may be a single major street or a broad mobility corridor, which provides connections for a range of transportation modes (transit, pedestrians, cyclists, freight, motor vehicles, etc.), not necessarily on the same street. A Civic Corridor is a prioritized subset of the city’s most prominent transit and transportation streets. They connect centers, provide regional connections, and include segments where commercial development and housing are focused. Civic Corridors are intended to continue their important transportation functions while providing livable environments for people, and evolving into distinctive places that are models of ecological design.

The 82nd Avenue Study is not intended to be a comprehensive planning effort for the corridor. Rather, it will complement the many other projects focusing on the corridor and build on collaborative efforts. Following this study, City Council could direct staff to generate a more robust “82nd Avenue Plan,” in partnership with community stakeholders.

What’s next?

The next steps for the public and project team include:

  1. Public review period for the Draft Report from January through March 2019.
  2. Planning and Sustainability Commission consideration. A public hearing is tentatively scheduled for March 12, 2019.
  3. City Council for adoption. Public hearings and a vote to be scheduled in April/May 2019.

Review the draft and comment

Community members are invited to review the draft report and appendices.

Submit comments to staff about the draft report by March 12, 2019.

Feedback will be reviewed as staff finalize the 82nd Avenue Study, which will go before City Council in April or May 2019.

Design guideline update coming to the South Portland Historic District

Metro grant will fund needed refresh of Portland’s oldest set of design guidelines

The City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will work with community partners over the next 18 months to update the design guidelines that apply to alterations, additions, and new construction in the South Portland Historic District. The guideline update will be made possible by a Metro 2040 Planning and Development grant, which will support a variety of land use plans and community development projects in 2019-20. The plans will support the growth of complete and inclusive communities throughout the Southwest Corridor. The updated historic district design guidelines will be reviewed at public hearings before the Historic Landmarks Commission and City Council before adoption in early 2020.

Corkish Apartments, an 1890 building in the South Portland Historic District.

Corkish Apartments, an 1890 building in the South Portland Historic District.

 

What are design guidelines?

Design guidelines provide clarity to property owners, designers, architects, and developers on the expected architectural character of alterations, additions, and new construction in historic districts and design overlay zones. For historic districts, design guidelines are land use approval criteria that must be met for any activity that is subject to City of Portland Historic Resource Review. Although not all historic districts have district-specific design guidelines, Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan provides policy direction for the development of district-specific guidelines tailored to the unique physical attributes of each historic district. A recently-adopted example is the Skidmore-Old Town Historic District Design Guidelines.

The South Portland Historic District

In 1977, the Portland City Council created the Lair Hill Conservation District to “encourage the conservation and maintenance of the historical and architectural integrity of the district.” In 1998, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability expanded the boundaries and elevated the designation type of the conservation district to become the South Portland Historic District. According to the historic district nomination form, South Portland is “locally significant under [National Register of Historic Places] Criterion A as a former gateway for ethnic groups arriving in the city of Portland, representing, in particular, Jewish and Italian immigrants. It also meets [National Register of Historic Places] Criterion C as a neighborhood that exemplifies the characteristics of modest Victorian style architecture.” The 49-acre district includes approximately 175 ‘contributing’ historic buildings.

The Portland City Council adopted design guidelines for the Lair Hill Conservation District in 1980. While the 1980 guidelines are still used as approval criteria, they only apply to the geography of the former (and smaller) conservation district, do not represent modern best practice for City of Portland design guidelines, and lack context and criteria related to the district’s multi-ethnic historic significance. The design guideline update will build upon the 1980 guidelines and 1998 historic district nomination to provide greater historic resource protection and development clarity in the South Portland Historic District prior to possible future construction of light rail through the district.

Cover of the Lair Hill Conservation Dist Guidelines

An excerpt from the conservation district design guidelines. 

 

Seeking professional services from historic preservation consultants

Historic preservation and urban design consultants are invited to submit bids to the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability to bring outside professional expertise to the design guideline project. Because of limited staff capacity and the urgency of using grant funds, outside consultant participation will assist in drafting written content and graphic elements for inclusion in the design guideline document. Bids for professional services are due January 17, 2019 through the City of Portland’s vendor portal.

Get involved in a new community workgroup

The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will assemble a community work group to assist in the development of the South Portland Historic District design guidelines. Representatives from the Bureau of Development Services, Historic Landmarks Commission, South Portland neighborhood, and other interested parties will inform City staff and professional consultants as decisions are made regarding contextual information and approval criteria to include in the design guidelines. Regardless of your expertise with historic preservation or the South Portland Historic District, if you’re interested in participating in the work group, please send an email to Historic Resources Program Manager Brandon Spencer-Hartle at historic.resources@portlandoregon.gov by February 14, 2019.

Image of 1913 building in S. Portland 

Vance Land Company Warehouse, a 1913 building in the South Portland Historic District.

PSC News: January 8, 2019 Meeting Recap

Vote for 2019 PSC Officers — Decision; Albina Vision — Briefing; PedPDX – Briefing; Bike Parking Code – Briefing

Agenda

  • Vote for 2019 PSC Officers — Decision
  • Albina Vision — Briefing
  • PedPDX – Briefing
  • Bike Parking Code – Briefing

Meeting files

An archive of meeting minutes and documents of all Planning and Sustainability Commission meetings are available at http://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/classification/3687.

For background information, see the PSC website at www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/psc, call 503-823-7700 or email psc@portlandoregon.gov.

Meeting playback on Channel 30 are scheduled to start the Friday following the meeting. Starting times may occur earlier for meetings over three hours long, and meetings may be shown at additional times as scheduling requires.

Channel 30 (closed-caption)
Friday at 3 p.m. | Sunday at 7:00 a.m. | Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access and will make reasonable accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or provide other services. When possible, please contact us at least three (3) business days before the meeting at 503-823-7700 or use City TTY 503-823-6868 or Oregon Relay Service 711.

503-823-7700: Traducción o interpretación | Chuyển Ngữ hoặc Phiên Dịch | 翻译或传译 | Turjumida ama Fasiraadda | Письменный или устный перевод | Traducere sau Interpretare | Письмовий або усний переклад | 翻訳または通訳 | ການແປພາສາ ຫຼື ການອະທິບາຍ | الترجمة التحريرية أو الشفهية | www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/71701

Planning and Sustainability Commission 01-08-2019