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SE Quadrant Virtual Open House – CLOSED

Materials from the recent SE Quadrant Plan virtual open house that ended on March 20th

Following the February 19th open house at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center, all materials from the event were posted online along with a comment  form to provide feedback on staff proposals. This “virtual” open house is now closed, and the comment form removed, but you can still access the materials below. A written summary of the open house starts on page 2 of the packet for Stakeholder Advisory Committee Meeting #14. If you have comments or questions about the SE Quadrant Plan or planning process in general, please contact email Derek Dauphin or call 503-823-5869.

Picture of physical open house on February 19th

Now you can share the experience of the February 19 open house at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center.

Welcome to the SE Quadrant Virtual Open House! We’re glad you came.

Perhaps you’re a business owner in the Central Eastside Industrial District. Maybe you pass through the district on your way to and from downtown. Or just like to visit to enjoy the food, drink and creative energy of the area. Any way you experience it, there’s no denying this part of Portland is bustling with activity: new development and businesses; more bikes, cars and trucks; and increased attention and interest from near and far.

The SE Quadrant planning effort is harnessing all of that energy into a new long-range plan for the area. The plan will help ensure that this unique part of the city evolves the way Portlanders want it to.

So far we’ve heard that people want to preserve the character of the area with its historic warehouses and protect its unique role as an industrial sanctuary and business incubator. But they also recognize that as the area grows and changes, it creates pressure on the streets and transportation system to accommodate more trucks, cars and even bikes. And then there’s its relationship to the river, which provides opportunities for greater access to this beloved natural resource, recreation, and even arts and culture.

So get comfy and explore the proposals below. Then tell us what you think with the comment form.

As you look at the proposals that follow, keep in mind that most of the SE Quadrant is an industrial sanctuary and has long served as an incubator for small businesses. A key goal of the new plan is to maintain this sanctuary while allowing for new industrial businesses and increased employment density.

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Land for Jobs

The Central Eastside is experiencing a period of extensive growth and renewal. But without new regulatory tools, the Central City will not be able to keep up with the demand for employment land. Staff land use proposals tweak the existing zoning to allow for more dense employment in the Central Eastside, including the new station areas along the MAX Orange Line due to open in September 2015.

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Staff are also preparing a new industrial disclosure statement that would inform people and businesses moving into the area about the characteristics (noise, fumes, trucks) common to the district. The disclosure would make it clear that the City of Portland would not enforce complaints against lawful activity within the district.


Historic Resources

Proposals also call for recognizing the historic character of much of the Central Eastside, particularly along historic main streets such as Morrison Street.

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Urban design

Potential conflicts between different kinds of businesses and uses — particularly residential, retail and industrial areas — are addressed through urban design. These proposals seek to clarify how areas with different zoning can co-exist.

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Transportation, parking, freight

Another area of concern is the already limited parking in the district. With more jobs and residents coming to the district, congestion on the streets will affect the ability of businesses to move freight. These proposals address concerns about traffic and congestion by applying a wide set of tools.

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Other proposals would help reduce conflicts between trucks and other types of traveling to and through the district. By making some routes that are less important to freight more attractive for bicycles and pedestrians, trucks and bikes will be less likely to get in each other’s way.

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Green Loop

A concept for a bicycle and pedestrian loop is proposed for the Central City. This “Green Loop” would be a key north-south route in the Central Eastside, connecting to the South Waterfront and downtown via the new Tilikum Crossing bridge. The eastside leg would include an I-84 pedestrian/bicycle bridge. What factors should be considered in picking a route, considering some initial data showing how loading and intersections could impact design?

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Open space

Staff responded to concerns about the lack of open space and green infrastructure such as trees. Due to the industrial nature of the district, areas for employees and residents to gather and relax will likely be near the most intense employment or residential development. The exception would be at the waterfront where there may be new park-like areas and enhanced habitat.

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The Willamette River and Riverfront

Staff presented a strategy for the Willamette River and riverfront which includes restoring and enhancing habitat, enlivening key locations with new activities and uses, and improving recreation options such as swimming and boating. This strategy is closely linked with all of the other concepts in the district; open space linkages, economic development and transportation alternatives are important components of the strategy along the riverfront.

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Next Steps

Input from the open house, the Stakeholder Advisory Committee and other Central Eastside stakeholders will help shape the Public Review Draft of the SE Quadrant Plan to be released in late April. In late May/June, the Planning and Sustainability Commission will hold public hearings on the Proposed Draft, followed by City Council hearings on the plan in summer/early fall of 2015.

List of all posters

Introduction

Proposals

February open house at the rail museum reveals new concepts and plans for the future of the Central Eastside

Portlanders are invited to learn about and share their feedback on the latest developments for the SE Quadrant Plan

One of the challenges of the SE Quadrant Plan is balancing the freight function of the district with additional traffic expected over the next 20 years.

Join the SE Quadrant planning team at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center (ORHC) on February 19 to learn about the future of the Central Eastside. View maps, images and diagrams, and read and comment on the goals, policies and actions that have been developed over the last year and a half. Input from the open house, the Stakeholder Advisory Committee and other Central Eastside stakeholders will help shape the SE Quadrant Draft Plan to be released in March.

You’ll be able to learn more and share your ideas about how the plan will:

  • Provide greater flexibility for new industrial uses, activate MAX light rail station areas, and enhance and connect areas of the district.
  • Address parking needs and improve key freight, bicycle and pedestrian corridors.
  • Continue to develop the riverfront as a destination and enhance river habitat.
  • Provide park-like spaces and green infrastructure.

Attendees are invited to explore the exhibits of historic train engines, and Rail Heritage Center staff will be on hand to answer questions. Snacks and refreshments will be provided.

SE Quadrant Open House
Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015, 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Oregon Rail Heritage Center, 2250 SE Water Ave
Parking: There is a parking lot available west of SE Water Ave on SE Caruthers Street.

Take a Walk on the Riverside, the Central Eastside’s that is, on July 22

Join City planners, river enthusiasts and other community members as they stroll along the Willamette’s edge, imagining the future of the Central City’s waterfront

You’re invited to a summer’s eve river walk on July 22. City staff and others interested in improving river habitat, boating and other activities in the Central Reach will tour and discuss key locations along the Central Eastside’s riverfront area.SEQ Walking Tour Map

Meet at the PCC Climb Center Auditorium, 1626 SE Waters Ave, at 5 p.m. for an overview before heading down to the river. Staff will pose specific questions and record comments that will inform development of the Central City 2035 Plan, which includes the Southeast Quadrant Plan and River Plan / Central Reach.

We’ll be stopping at the following locations along the way:

1. Madison Dock (Fire Station) & Plaza area
2. Holman Dock area
3. OMSI area
4. End of Caruthers Street
5. Willamette Greenway Trail connection

Bring a water bottle; light snacks will be provided. Come support the river!

For more information, contact Debbie Bischoff at Debbie.bischoff@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-6946.

Portland's Central Eastside: 2035

A look towards what the future may hold

“Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.”

— Niels Bohr

What will the Central Eastside look like in the year 2035? Will it continue to be a home to industrial services, warehousing and distribution companies? Will the district still contain businesses started three generations ago? Will it include manufacturers making products commonplace in our lives today as well as products we cannot yet imagine?

Answering these questions is difficult. Imagine predicting 35 years ago — when Oregon’s economy was dominated by resource industries and the car culture shaped our urban form — that within three decades our economy would be shaped by the silicon chip and entrepreneurs, and employees who prefer to commute to work by foot, bike and streetcar.

Although we can’t predict the future, we can chart a course to the future we hope to realize. This journey will require some bold decisions and diligence to implement new strategies that take us where we collectively want to go. It will also require patience and the ability to creatively respond to the inevitable threats, opportunities and mid-course corrections that will deliver us to our desired destination.

Relationship to Central City 2035

The SE Quadrant Plan is an element of the broader Central City 2035 (CC2035) project to update the 1988 Central City Plan. The CC2035 Concept Plan, adopted in 2012, includes goals, policies and an urban design direction that provide high level guidance for the entire Central City. The Concept Plan established a framework from which the more detailed quadrant plans are being developed.

The SE Quadrant Plan will focus on building the next generation of industrial/employment sanctuaries, with higher employment densities to enhance and strengthen the Central Eastside’s role as a major employment center in the Central City. The planning effort will follow through on the CC2035 concept of southern “bookends” to the Central City, which could provide a new employment and education hub at OMSI and South Waterfront across the river.

The Concept Plan also articulates a vision for a Green Loop around the entire Central City, circling both sides of the river and providing people of all ages and abilities a way of walking, biking, strolling or rolling on a continuous, safe route. A community amenity such as this would further enhance the Central Eastside as a destination point for recreation, cultural attractions, restaurants, tourism and other amenities that enliven an area and create a sense of place.

You can help shape the future of the Central Eastside

Share your thoughts and input at the SE Quadrant Open House on July 8, where staff will present concepts that have emerged through the planning process so far.

Tuesday, July 8, 4 p.m – 7 p.m.
Oregon Rail Heritage Center
2250 SE Water Avenue

This is the final installment of a blog series aimed at exploring the past, present, and future of the Central Eastside.

“Get on Board!” the SE Quadrant Open House on July 8, 4 – 7 p.m.

At the Oregon Rail Heritage Center learn about the Central Eastside and the big ideas coming out of the planning process so far and share ideas about the future of the area.

Train engine at the ORHC

Nickel Plate Road is one of four engines on display at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center

If you haven’t been to the Oregon Rail Heritage Center yet, now’s your chance!

On Tuesday, July 8 from 4 – 7 p.m., you can visit the museum for free and learn about the history of the Central Eastside and the thriving business ecosystem there – all in the presence of historic locomotives, railroad equipment and artifacts.

You can also learn about the big ideas coming out of the Southeast Quadrant planning process and the recent charrette event.

Staff from the following partner bureaus will on hand to answer questions and provide explanations:

  • Planning & Sustainability
  • Transportation
  • Portland Development Commission
  • Environmental Services
  • Parks & Recreation

Project staff will share input from the open house with the Stakeholder Advisory Committee as they help develop draft land use concepts. These concepts will illustrate the City’s goals for the district and identify the strategies needed to meet them.

Southeast Quadrant Open House
Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 4 – 7 p.m.
Oregon Rail Heritage Center
2250 SE Water Ave (see access details below)
Topics: Existing conditions, businesses in the district, and big ideas about land use, transportation, river and open space from the Stakeholder Advisory Committee and public charrette

Snacks and refreshments will be provided.

We thank the Oregon Rail Heritage Foundation for providing the venue. They will have docents available to explain the history of the train engines and give free tours.

Details for Accessing the Oregon Rail Heritage Center

  • By car: The ORHC parking lot is at the corner of SE Grand and Caruthers, just north of the curve where one becomes the other (Grand/Caruthers), and next to the red and white building that is currently the Stacey and Witbeck light rail project office, under the MLK viaduct.
  • Additional parking: Portland Opera has offered their parking lot as auxiliary parking for the event and can be found on Caruthers directly across Water Ave from the Stacey and Witbeck office.
  • By bike or on foot: Enter the ORHC from Water Ave where new traffic lights are hung but not yet active, just north of the light rail tracks.
  • By bus: Routes 6, 10, 12, 14, 15, 19, 20, 31, 32, 33, 99 have stops within a short walk to the ORHC.
  • By streetcar: Take the CL line south all the way to the OMSI stop. Exit and walk south around the front of the streetcar, cross the tracks and head back to Water Ave. Walk south on Water Ave and cross at the not-yet-active new traffic light in front of ORHC.