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Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan appealed to state Court of Appeals

The Multnomah Neighborhood Association appeals a March 2018 Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) decision rejecting its appeal of the Middle Housing Policy.

The Multnomah Neighborhood Association has appealed a State of Oregon decision upholding the new 2035 Comprehensive Plan to the Court of Appeals. The growth plan was adopted by City Council in June 2016, with a delayed effective date to allow time for state review. The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) issued an order in December 2017 approving the plan. In March of 2018, the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) voted to reject six appeals that had been filed to block elements of the plan.

The appeal of the LCDC decision is primarily concerned with the “middle housing policy,” which City Council added to the plan in early 2016. The policy encourages the City to consider zoning decisions to allow more duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, accessory dwelling units and small multi-unit or clustered residential buildings.

The City’s Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) is considering ways to implement the policy through the Residential Infill Project. They have not yet made a recommendation to City Council.  

Portland’s new growth plan went into effect in May. The 20-year plan includes new land use policies, land use maps and zoning, and new public facilities plans. This was the largest overhaul of Portland’s land use plan since the City’s original Comprehensive was adopted in 1980. 

The new appeal does not change the status of the plan, which is already in effect, but it delays state acknowledgement of the plan. The Bureau of Development Services is implementing several additional development review protocols while the plan remains unacknowledged. For example, some development projects are being required to do additional analysis to directly document compliance with state land use while the appeal is being considered. The plan cannot be formally acknowledged by the state until appeals are resolved.  

2035 Comprehensive Plan goes Live!

New long range plan for Portland goes into effect, making new land use policies, maps and zoning, and public facilities plans official.

Portland’s new 2035 Comprehensive Plan went into effect this afternoon at 1 p.m. The 20-year plan includes new land use policies, land use maps and zoning, and new public facilities plans. This was the largest overhaul of Portland’s land use plan since the City’s original Comprehensive was adopted in 1980. 

The plan was adopted by City Council in June 2016, with a delayed effective date to allow time for state review. The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) issued an order in December approving the plan. In March the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) voted to reject six appeals that had been filed to block elements of the plan.

Implementation plans in effect

Corresponding revisions to zoning maps and codes also took effect today. The major changes include new mixed use and commercial zoning, new campus institutional zoning at major colleges and hospitals, and tighter protections for prime industrial land. 

In total, 15 percent of the city’s land area was rezoned. New community involvement procedures also took effect, placing greater emphasis on involving renters, communities of color, immigrants and others who have not typically participated in land use decisions. 

First amendments adopted, too

City Council also voted today on the first amendments to the plan. A package of largely technical code and map revisions were made to resolve issues that had been identified after June 2016. The Council also took a vote on the Central City 2035 Plan, which will take effect next month.

Although the plan is now in place, LCDC’s decision may still be appealed to the Court of Appeals. State agencies have approved the plan, but it will not be officially “acknowledged” until further appeal opportunities have been exhausted. Until then, a direct evaluation of conformance with state land use goals will be required with some local land use decisions.

Heads up! Portland's new Comp Plan goes into effect on Thursday, May 24 at 1 p.m.

The current Zoning Code and Zoning Maps will be replaced with new copies Thursday afternoon/evening; new code and maps should be live by midnight, May 24

With the 2035 Comprehensive Plan scheduled to take effect on Thursday, May 24 at 1 p.m., the bureaus of Planning and Sustainability and Development Services are working to ensure a smooth transition. 

As part of the transition process, all of the amended Zoning Maps and Zoning Code pages are being updated, as well as a variety of online resources. 

The BDS Permit Center is typically closed Thursday afternoons, which allows City staff a few hours to make the transition. Zoning Code page updates will occur over several hours on Thursday afternoon. While not all of the Zoning Code pages were amended with the Comprehensive Plan Update, users of the Zoning Code should note that all code pages are being reprinted in an updated format. New zoning will be available on Portland Maps at midnight on May 24, ready for business on Friday, May 25.   

Visitors to the BPS website on Friday will notice a number of other changes, in addition to new codes and maps. This includes:

  • A new streamlined 2035 Comprehensive Plan website that will make it easier to locate key resources. 
  • A new interactive map tool to provide easier browsing of the Zoning Map and Comprehensive Plan map.
  • Final reports for the Early Implementation Project, Map Refinement Project and Code Reconciliation Projects will be moved to the BPS Documents Library and will still be available as a resource for those who need to research what changed. 
  • The old 1980 Comprehensive Plan is also being moved to the BPS Document Library, and will remain available as an historical document.
  • For those who need to research the old zoning maps, there is a tool for that

With all of these changes, we suggest you refresh your browser history on Friday! This story will be updated with any new links after the transition is complete. 

Portland’s City Council unanimously adopts new Zoning Code and Map, Community Involvement Program and Transportation System Plan

Mayor and commissioners’ vote marks final City Council action on the Comprehensive Plan Update

This afternoon, City Council voted unanimously to amend Portland’s Zoning Map, Zoning Code and Transportation System Plan, as well as establish a new Community Involvement Program. These items make up the Recommended Early Implementation Package of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. With their votes, the Mayor and Commissioners took their last action on the Comprehensive Plan Update.

Final Steps
Portland’s newly adopted 2035 Comprehensive Plan will now go to the state for acknowledgement. In early 2017, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will organize the legislative record and transmit City Council’s decision to the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development. Once transmitted, a “Notice of Adoption” will be mailed to all who testified on the Recommended Early Implementation Package.

Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan will tentatively take effect on January 1, 2018, following state acknowledgement.

Questions?
Call the Comp Plan Helpline at 503-823-0195.

It’s 2035. What did the new Comprehensive Plan deliver?

Imagine … 20 years from now, what would Portland look like guided by our new long range plan for a prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient city?

A little more than 35 years ago, Portland welcomed its first Comprehensive Plan, a blue print for the city that would be admired around the world in the decades to come. In 1980, the population of Portland was 366,000, a little more than half of what it is today.

Back then, Mt St Helens had just erupted, and Supertramp and Donna Summers were all the rage. Smart phones were only on Star Trek, Microsoft had just 11 employees, and a kid could ride a bike without a helmet and get away with it.

Portlanders banded together into neighborhood associations to block the Mt Hood Freeway and ensured those transportation dollars would go toward the construction of the MAX blue line. A downtown parking lot was transformed into Pioneer Square, and the Harbor Freeway into Tom McCall Waterfront Park. And Portland’s 1980 Comp Plan directed population and employment growth into a series of “nodes and noodles.”

The rest is history.

Fast forward to 2035 ... Nodes and noodles have become “centers and corridors,” and Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan has helped a mid-sized city grow up. Portland has become a place where most people can live healthy lives, with access to good jobs, safe streets and bikeways, affordable housing, clean air and water, walkable neighborhoods, quality transit service and beautiful parks.

The 2035 Comp Plan built upon the best of Portland’s strong planning heritage, advanced a more equitable approach to neighborhood development and leveraged Portland’s rapid growth to balance prosperity, human and environmental health, equity and resilience.

Imagine 20 years from now …

… a Portland that has nearly a quarter of million new people living here. Places like Hollywood, the Jade District, North Pearl, and Barbur and Powell Boulevards will be high-functioning mixed use areas with easy access to transit and a range of housing types to meet the needs of smaller households, Portlanders who want to age in place, and an increasingly diverse population.

Imagine …

… a city with 140,000 more jobs. More middle-wage jobs and a balanced economy fueled by the preservation of industrial land, expansion of our colleges and hospitals, a robust Central City, and flourishing smaller businesses in centers and corridors.

… better transit with new routes throughout East Portland, connecting more residents with their jobs; and fewer cars on the road, creating more room for freight, bikes and pedestrians.

… healthier people who have easy, safe and pleasant routes to walk, bike or take transit.

… and a safer and more resilient Portland with well-maintained infrastructure.

Most of Portland’s diverse population would live in complete, healthy and safe neighborhoods, close to the amenities they need. Tens of thousands more well-paying jobs would offer residents financial security and a pathway to wealth. Increased housing options would make it possible for individuals and families to create households to their liking. And a robust transit system and greenway network would offer multiple transportation options for Portlanders to get to and from work, as well as other places they want to go.

Sound crazy? It’s not. If the 1980 Comp Plan could transform a city suffering from suburban flight and crumbling infrastructure into a destination city for tourists as well as newcomers looking for a place to call home … it’s entirely possible that the 2035 Comp Plan — built on the success of previous planning efforts and created with the benefit of more data and public involvement, and inspired by so many other forward-thinking cities — could successfully guide Portland well into the mid-21st century.

Thank you!

With the adoption of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan by City Council on June 15, 2016, Portland's long range plan for a prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient Portland is on its way to the state for acknowledgement. And, thus, a reality.

Many thanks to the tens of thousands of community members who contributed to the plan. Just as with the 1980 Comp Plan, your contributions will be appreciated for generations to come.