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Always Ready, Always There

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UPDATED -- NEWS RELEASE 02/16/11: Portland Fire & Rescue Responds to House Fire at 1307 NE 111th, Finds Victim

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UPDATED INFORMATION WITH FIRE CAUSE & DAMAGE ESTIMATES

February 16, 2012

4:08 PM

 

Video above courtesy of The Oregonian at www.oregonlive.com

Investigators determined that the early morning fire at 1307 NE 111th was accidental in nature and believe it was a result of household items that were too close to a fireplace. It appeared that the burning of construction materials and other debris had been a practice. A length of tree wood, too large for the firebox, was found sticking out of the fireplace. Investigators were unable to locate a smoke alarm while processing the scene.

The estimated value of the home and its contents was $150,000; fire investigators have determined that the home is nearly a complete loss.


Portland Fire & Rescue also has updated information that a firefighter sustained a minor burn injury while fighting the fire.


Portland Fire & Rescue reminds citizens to:

  • Maintain a combustible clearance around all appliances per manufacturer recommendations.
  • Provide and maintain smoke alarms on every floor and every sleeping area of your home.
  • Identify primary and secondary means of egress from each room of your home.
  • Use proper types and size of fuels in fireplaces and other heating appliances per manufacturer recommendations.

#####

 

February 16, 2012

9:11 AM

At 5:03 am, Portland firefighters responded to reports of heavy fire coming from the back side of a house located at 1307 NE 111th.  Firefighters from Portland Fire Station 30 (Gateway) arrived first on scene and began pulling hoselines to the fire.  Neighbors came up to firefighters and reported that one individual lived in the home and they had not seen him come out.  Firefighters launched an aggressive search for the individual right away. 

While searching the home, firefighters encountered heat and zero visibility due to the smoke.  They performed a systematic search of the rooms.  Firefighters were hampered in their search by an excessive amount of contents in the home.  Firefighters located a victim in his bed in one of the bedrooms.  They took the victim to the floor ready to rescue him when some of the home's excessive contents fell on him.  Firefighters had to uncover the man to find him and eventually evacuate.  Firefighter/paramedics determined that the man in his 50's had died.

Firefighters also had a challenging time getting hose lines in to fight the fire which was active in the first and second floor walls of the home.  Firefighters had to move contents away from the walls before they could attack the blaze.  This is a serious safety hazard for firefighters.  Additionally, the excessive fuel load caused the fire to burn longer and hotter.  It took approximately 50 minutes to bring the fire under control.  The house is severely damaged and fire investigators are on scene working to determine the fire's cause.  The coroner's office was also called to the scene.

This is the second fire this week in Portland where excessive contents in the home have hampered firefighters’ ability to contain the blaze.  Although it's uncomfortable to talk about, hoarding can indicate a mental health disorder - one that affects between 6 and 15 million Americans.  75U.S.cities have community task forces specifically designed to help address the issue.

Portland Fire & Rescue wants citizens to understand that hoarding is both a personal and public safety issue. If you or someone you know may have an issue with excessive accumulation of contents in your home, please check out the following tips and resources.  The hoarding phenomena is both layered and complex.  Recognizing there is a problem is the first step; the next is seeking effective treatment if simple anti-clutter strategies don't work. 

Gerald Nestadt, MD offers the following six anti-clutter strategies:

  1. Make immediate decisions about mail and newspapers. Go through mail and newspapers on the day you receive them and throw away unwanted materials immediately. Don’t leave anything to be decided on later.
  2. Think twice about what you allow into your home. Wait a couple of days after seeing a new item before you buy it. And when you do purchase something new, discard another item you own to make room for it.
  3. Set aside 15 minutes a day to declutter. Start small–with a table, perhaps, or a chair–rather than tackling the entire, overwhelming house at once. If you start to feel anxious, take a break and do some deep-breathing or relaxation exercises.
  4. Dispose of anything you have not used in a year. That means old clothes, broken items, and craft projects you’ll never finish. Remind yourself that many items are easily replaceable if you need them later.
  5. Follow the OHIO rule: Only Handle It Once. If you pick something up, make a decision then and there about it, and either put it where it belongs or discard it. Don’t fall into the trap of moving things from one pile to another, again and again.
  6. Ask for help if you can’t do it on your own. If you feel these strategies are impossible to carry out and you cannot cope with the problem on your own, seek out a mental health professional.

For additional information and resources for those with hoarding disorder and their families, please visit the International OCD Foundation’s website at http://www.ocfoundation.org/hoarding/.

A fact sheet on hoarding has been posted to Portland Fire & Rescue’s website at http://www.portlandonline.com/fire/blog.

Photographs by Dick Harris, PortlandFire & Rescue.

    

  Portland Fire & Rescue 

   We Respond: Always Ready, Always There

   February 16, 2012 

 

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Increase Your Awareness: Compulsive Hoarding

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This morning, Portland firefighters responded to a residential fire in NE Portland. While searching the home, firefighters encountered heat and zero visibility due to the smoke.  They performed a systematic search of the rooms but were hampered in their search by an excessive amount of contents in the home.  Firefighters located a victim in his bed in one of the bedrooms.  They took the victim to the floor ready to rescue him when some of the home's excessive contents fell on him.  Firefighters had to uncover the man to find him and eventually evacuate.  Sadly, firefighter/paramedics determined that the man in his 50's had died.

This is the second fire this week in Portland where excessive contents in the home have hampered firefighters’ ability to contain the blaze.  Although it's uncomfortable to talk about, hoarding can indicate a mental health disorder - one that affects between 6 and 15 million Americans.  75 U.S.cities have community task forces specifically designed to help address the issue.

Portland Fire & Rescue wants citizens to understand that hoarding is both a personal and public safety issue. If you or someone you know may have an issue with excessive accumulation of contents in your home, please visit http://www.ocfoundation.org/hoarding for additional information and resources. A fact sheet on hoarding can be accessed here.

    

  Portland Fire & Rescue 

   We Respond: Always Ready, Always There

   February 16, 2012 

 

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Truck 2 Graduation Day for 8 New Full-Fledged Firefighters

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This morning, Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R) held a graduation ceremony for Truck 2 graduates at its Training Academy. This class included eight new firefighters who successfully completed PF&R’s Training Academy, worked under the close supervision of officers and firefighters at Station 2, and are now full-fledged firefighters. 

Training, Safety & EMS Division Chief Glen Eisner and Fire Chief John Klum

Station 2 Captain Joe Budge and Training, Safety & EMS Division Chief Glen Eisner present a new firefighter with a badge

In addition to receiving their badges, the graduating class received their own turnouts and traded in their black helmets (worn by trainees) for yellow helmets (worn by firefighters). Fire Chief John Klum, Training, Safety & EMS Division Chief Glen Eisner, and Training Captain Joe Budge delivered the commencement address, acknowledging the fact that passing PF&R’s Training Academy is difficult for both firefighters and their families.  As such, both thanked the graduates for their dedication and commitment, and their family members who supported them throughout the past year.

Fire Marshal Erin Janssens and Fire Chief John Klum wished all new firefighters well in their career as a firefighter

The ceremony was followed by cake and photos. 

A big congratulations to Firefighters Jakob, Elliot, Robbie, Evan, Derrik, Sean, Gretchen, and James!

WELCOME TO THE PF&R FAMILY!

    

  Portland Fire & Rescue 

   We Respond: Always Ready, Always There

   February 16, 2012 

 

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Firefighters Attend Youth Day, Celebrate Young People

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Portland Firefighters Ron Rouse and Jerome Perryman joined Administrative Assistant Miranda Rossetto and representatives from other Portland Bureaus at City Hall this morning to show their support at the annual Youth Day event.

Youth Day encourages not only academic achievement and an appreciation of the history and culture of people of African descent, but also positive behavior that aims to encourage youth to make positive life choices and become productive citizens in society.

Youth Day is just one of many activities sponsored by the City of Portlandand celebrated during the 2012 Black History Month. Click here to view the event calendar. All are welcome to take part in events.

    

  Portland Fire & Rescue 

   We Respond: Always Ready, Always There

   February 16, 2012 

 

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NEWS RELEASE 02/18/12: Portland Fire & Rescue Responds to Second Fatal House Fire in Three Days at 438 N. Failing St.

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UPDATED WITH DECEASED VICTIM'S NAME

February 18, 2012

5:51 PM 

 

The identity of the man who was found dead in an upstairs hallway by firefighters has been released by the Medical Examiners Office. He is Bradley Hays, a 38-year old male from Portland.

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UPDATED WITH DAMAGE ESTIMATES

February 18, 2012

3:41 PM 

 

Investigators have placed a preliminary value on the structure and contents at $220,000 with monetary losses totaling $60,000. While investigators have determined the cause of this fire to be accidental, the exact cause is not being released at this point.

Please note that the corrected address is 438 N. Failing Street.

#####

 

February 18, 2012

6:52 AM

 

 

At 3:54 am, Portland firefighters were dispatched to reports of heavy fire at 438 N. Failing St.  When firefighters from Portland Fire Station 24 (Overlook/Swan Island) arrived first on scene, they encountered multiple occupants evacuating out of the basement and first floor windows, as well as heavy fire coming from the back of the two-story home.


Reports indicate that two people who were sleeping in the basement at the time of the fire were woken up by the lights of the fire engine that pulled up in front of the house.  Apparently many rooms in the home were rented out to individuals.  

Firefighters were urged by occupants who had already escaped the fire to search the second floor for trapped victims.  When a ladder truck crew from Portland Fire Station 13 (Lloyd Center) entered the second floor to perform search and rescue, they were met by high levels of heat and smoke.  Portions of the second floor had burned through in the blaze causing hazardous conditions inside for firefighters.

"Conditions were so hot that we crawled on our stomachs to perform the search," said Station 13 Captain Rob Hutchens.  "Our helmet shields were melting.  We knew we had to get out, but we gave it one more shot.  That's when we found a man in the hallway."

With one firefighter at the man's head and another firefighter at his feet, they carried him downstairs to waiting Portland firefighter/paramedics.  It was determined that the 39-year-old man had died. 

There were four people in the house at the time of this morning's fire.  Fire investigators have determined that there were no working smoke alarms in this home.  

 

"With the second fire death in three days, we are urging citizens to make sure they have a smoke alarm in every sleeping area and on every floor of their home," said Portland Fire & Rescue Public Information Officer Paul Corah.  "We just can't stress enough how important it is."

A total of five engines, three ladder trucks, three chiefs, five fire investigators, and 50 personnel responded to this incident.  Fire investigators are working to determine the cause of the fire and damage estimates.  The Red Cross responded to assist two of the adults who need assistance with shelter and clothing.

    

  Portland Fire & Rescue 

   We Respond: Always Ready, Always There

   February 18, 2012 

 

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