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The City of Portland, Oregon

Nick Fish (In Memoriam)

City of Portland Commissioner

phone: 503-823-3589

Email: nick@portlandoregon.gov

1221 S.W. 4th, Room 240, Portland, OR 97204

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Summer Free for All schedule now available

Portland Parks & Recreation's 2012 Summer Free for All schedule is now available.

May 22, 2012

Believe it or not, summer is just around the corner, which means Portland Parks & Recreation's 2012 Summer Free For All is coming soon!

Join us for free movies, concerts, and festivals beginning in June until the last moments of summer in September.

Our 2012 schedule of events is now available online.

Many thanks to our sponsors for making Summer Free For All possible.

We'll see you this summer in the park!

McCoy Village Grand Re-Opening

This morning, Nick joined Catholic Charities & Caritas Housing, members of the McCoy family, and community members to celebrate the grand re-opening of McCoy Village, a newly-restored affordable community, home to 55 individuals and families.

May 23, 2012

By David Nguyen

This morning, Nick joined Catholic Charities & Caritas Housing, members of the McCoy family, and community members to celebrate the grand re-opening of McCoy Village, a newly-restored affordable community, home to 55 individuals and families.

Named for honored community leaders Gladys and Bill McCoy, the complex suffered from poor construction and unsafe living conditions.  Gladys was a former Multnomah County Chair and Portland Public School Board Member, and Bill represented North Portland as an Oregon State Senator.

The Portland Housing Bureau was proud to invest $1.5 million in Tax Increment Financing from the Interstate Urban Renewal Area to restore McCoy Village.  The funds were part of the City's 30% Set-Aside commitment, which prioritizes building and preserving affordable homes.

In addition to restoring the homes themselves, McCoy also has a restored sense of community with a new child care room, a computer lab, a playground, and resident gathering spaces. 

McCoy Village adds to the growing list of affordable opportunities in our community, along with Chaucer Court, Bud Clark Commons, and the soon-to-open Gray's Landing.  These investments in our community help make Portland a great place to call "home." 

McCoy Village, three blocks of low-income housing in Northeast Portland, re-opened after Catholic Charities remodel

Larry Bingham in The Oregonian

Cully Park receives Metro Council grant for renovations

Thomas Cully Park in Northeast Portland is soon be transformed, thanks to a grant the Metro Council awarded last Thursday.

May 24, 2012

By Sophia Kecskes

Thomas Cully Park in Northeast Portland is soon be transformed, thanks to a grant the Metro Council awarded last Thursday.

With a $577,000 grant, the park won’t look like the 25-acre landfill it currently is for much longer. The renovation plan calls for walking trails, a soccer field and basketball court, picnic areas, a community garden, parking, and a sidewalk connecting the park to a safe crossing of NE Killingsworth Street.

The grant will allow us to take a big step forward in fulfilling the dream of Portland Parks & Recreation's Cully Park Master Plan, bringing a much-needed new park to the Cully neighborhood.

The Nature in Neighborhoods capital grants program has invested more than $6.6 million in local natural areas since it began in 2006. Grants are designed to help nature thrive in urban communities.

Cully Park dream moves forward

Larry Bingham in The Oregonian

 

Nature projects across the region get $1.7 million boost as Metro Council awards six Nature in Neighborhood grants

Laura Oppenheimer Odom on oregonmetro.gov

33 acres in Forest Park free of invasive vines

33 acres in Portland Parks & Recreation's Forest Park is now free of the invasive, tree killing vines thanks to enormous contributions of our partners at West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, Forest Park Conservancy and their volunteers!

June 1, 2012

By David Nguyen

We’d received some great news today.  33 acres in Portland Parks & Recreation's Forest Park is now free of the invasive, tree killing vines thanks to enormous contributions of our partners at West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, Forest Park Conservancy and their volunteers!

The 5000 acres Forest Park features natural area with an impressive trail system featuring 70+ miles of trails, fire lanes and gravel roads, providing excellent opportunities for hiking, walking, running, and simply escaping the urban atmosphere.

The Park 30.2-mile long Wildwood Trail is a part of the region’s 40-Mile Loop system that links Forest Park to pedestrian and other routes along the Columbia River to Gresham, to Southeast Portland, along the Willamette Greenway, and back to the Marquam Trail in Southwest Portland.

To help you find your way to various trailheads, there's a handy google map with info on 17 of Forest Park's most popular trailheads.  Follow the link to view the overview map and/or generate driving directions to any of the trailheads.

33 acres in Forest Park free of invasive, tree-killing vines, conservation district says

The Oregonian, May 22

Auditor's report emphasizes need for stable housing funding

City Auditor LaVonne Griffin-Valade released an audit of the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB), "Bureau acting on risks, though more remains to be done."

May 24, 2012

Yesterday, City Auditor LaVonne Griffin-Valade released an audit of the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB), "Bureau acting on risks, though more remains to be done."

The audit acknowledges and affirms the hard work we’ve undertaken to build the new bureau, and identifies a number of risks facing the bureau.

We wholeheartedly agree with the Auditor’s recommendation that we identify a sustainable, dedicated source of funding to support the bureau’s work.

Going forward, this audit will help guide our work to strengthen the foundation of the bureau’s new house. Thanks to the Auditor and her team for their collaborative, thoughtful approach.

Portland auditor says Housing Bureau needs stable funding: Portland City Hall roundup

Beth Slovic in the Oregonian