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The City of Portland, Oregon

Nick Fish (In Memoriam)

City of Portland Commissioner

phone: 503-823-3589

Email: nick@portlandoregon.gov

1221 S.W. 4th, Room 240, Portland, OR 97204

Weekend Roundup with Nick

This weekend, Nick attended three great Portland events.

June 2, 2014

This weekend, Nick attended three great Portland events.   

On Saturday, Nick was proud to join Portlanders in celebrating the life of the late Charles Jordan.  Charles Jordan, Portland’s first African American City Commissioner, was a great community leader and urban pioneer. After his service as a Commissioner, Charles Jordan later became Portland Parks & Recreation Director – laying the foundation that built the Gold Medal system we enjoy today. His legacy lives on in the children and families who visit the Charles Jordan Community Center in North Portland. 

Later that evening, Nick attended one of the best parties of the year – the Pacific Northwest College of Art’s (PNCA) 2014 Gala, Transformation Now! Nick enjoyed connecting with Portland’s arts community, which helped raise millions to support PNCA’s future. Gala attendees were surprised by a riveting performance by talented singer-songwriter, KD Lang.  

On Sunday, Nick joined Southeast Portland neighbors for Zenger Farm’s 2014 kick-off of the Lents International Farmers Market.  A provider of affordable and culturally unique produce, the Market is a great place to buy delicious vegetables while supporting emerging farmers and new business owners.

RACC grants expand community access to the arts

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) has awarded over $25,000 in special grants to 10 local nonprofit organizations.

June 4, 2014

The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) has awarded over $25,000 in special grants to 10 local nonprofit organizations

The grants were possible thanks to local voters who approved the Arts Education and Access Fund in 2012.  The grants invest in nonprofits that serve diverse and underserved communities, including communities of color, immigrants, refugees, people with disabilities, and the LGTBQ community.

Nick is proud to serve as Council liaison to RACC, as it works to provide equal access to art for everyone in our community. One of the requirements of RACC-funded organizations is that all productions or programs must be available to the public – without discrimination – and take place in venues that are fully accessible for people with disabilities.   

The 10 grants awarded include cultural festivals, youth education, musical performances, and more!

For information about the grantees, visit RACC’s website.

Photo courtesy of RACC

Our sewer, stormwater, and water utilities: next steps

Working with our community partners, we have taken a number of important steps toward increasing transparency, stabilizing rates, and spending ratepayer dollars wisely

June 5, 2014

This week, Nick reached the one-year mark of leading the Portland Water Bureau and the Bureau of Environmental Services.

Working with our community partners, we have taken a number of important steps toward increasing transparency, stabilizing rates, and spending ratepayer dollars wisely.

Looking forward, we still have work to do. Today’s Portland Tribune editorial acknowledges the hard work of the past year, and gives us a call to action: let’s get it right.

This summer, we will launch a Utility Oversight Blue Ribbon Commission, which will make recommendations to the City Council in the fall. We will share more information on the Blue Ribbon Commission next week.

Reforming Our Utilities

 

Our Opinion: Let's get water, sewer bureau changes right

The Portland Tribune

 

City pins plans for water fix on panel

Jim Redden in the Portland Tribune

 

Failed water district proposal will help Portland: Editorial

The Oregonian Editorial Board

Funding community watershed health projects

City Council has approved $95,000 in grants for 13 community watershed health projects in Portland.

June 6, 2014

City Council has approved $95,000 in grants for 13 community watershed health projects in Portland.

Since 1995, the Community Watershed Stewardship Program has provided over $867,000 in grants to local organizations.  These grants support innovative projects that improve watershed health and protect water quality. 

For the average residential sewer ratepayer, the grants represent an investment of about 24 cents a year, and every grant dollar invested leverages three dollars in volunteer time and similar contributions. 

More than 40,000 volunteers have worked on projects funded by stewardship grants – helping enhance and restore Portland’s beautiful natural areas.

Some of this year’s projects include educational programs, rain gardens, cleanups, and local restoration.

Community groups can apply annually for grants up to $10,000.  For more information, visit BES’ website

Friday Roundup

Our Opinion: Let's get water, sewer bureau changes right

Mark Garber in the Portland Tribune

 

Portland boil water alert: Crews find dead birds at bottom of empty reservoir

Lynne Terry in The Oregonian

 

Water Bureau Finds Two Dead Birds While Draining Mount Tabor Reservoir

Aaron Mesh in the Willamette Week

 

City pins plans for water fix on panel

Jim Redden in the Portland Tribune

 

City Commissioner Calls Nick Fish "Captain Renault," Answers His Questions on the Portland Street Fee

Aaron Mesh in the Willamette Week

 

Portland street fee: Commissioner Steve Novick answered colleague Nick Fish's 11 questions, addressed email to 'Captain Renault'

Andrew Theen in The Oregonian

 

Novick Answers Fish's Questions on Street Fee

Denis C. Theriault in the Portland Mercury