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The City of Portland, Oregon

Nick Fish

City of Portland Commissioner

phone: 503-823-3589

Email: nick@portlandoregon.gov

1221 S.W. 4th, Room 240, Portland, OR 97204

Senn's Dairy Park and Community Garden opening

Commissioner Fish at the opening of the first park in Parkrose, the Senn's Dairy Community Garden.

Commissioner Fish at the Senn's Dairy Community Garden opening in Parkrose.

July 16, 2009

Portland's Parkrose neighborhood has historically been parks-deficient. In fact, it has been as parks-deficient as they come: until last weekend, it had not a single City park.

Commissioner Fish was honored to be involved in the last stages of this project, which has been in the works for eight years, and to open the Senn's Dairy Park and Community Garden last weekend. Senn's Dairy Park is the third facility in East Portland the Commissioner has had the pleasure of opening in recent months.

Fueled by the passion and dedication of the people of Parkrose, this park will be a wonderful community asset, providing a safe, inviting gathering place for the Parkrose community for years to come.

Oregon's recession: By the numbers

Portland Commissioner Nick Fish on the HUD Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress and the increasing importance of service to help our most vulnerable.

HUD Annual Homelessness Assessment Report

July 15, 2009

Last week, the federal government announced that Oregon ranks first in the nation in per capita homelessness. One in 200 Oregonians is homeless, and we are one of the few states where the majority of homeless people are unsheltered.

Other statistics echo the same unfortunate reality: Oregon is second in the nation in unemployment, trailing only Michigan, and third in the nation in hunger.

Nick spoke with KGW yesterday about the report and about the challenges facing Portland, and has issued a call to action to all Portlanders, urging government, non-profits, churches, and citizens to do more to address increasing need in our community.

There are many ways we can help – through groups like Hands on Greater Portland, the Mayor’s Portland Is Better Together initiative, or by giving directly to local organizations.

Council introduces Intertwine

Commissioner Nick Fish and Metro President David Bragdon announced the launch of Intertwine, a regional partnership to promote parks, trails, and natuiral areas.

Intertwine, a joint effort led by Multnomah County and the City of Portland

July 10, 2009

Portland has become a model for integrating a commitment to healthy, connected, and green communities with our regional planning and environmental management. Now, Metro and the City of Portland have partnered to jointly further this effort in our region.

Commissioner Fish and Metro President David Bragdon introduced 'Intertwine,' formerly 'Connecting Green,' at Wednesday's Council session.

Working to strengthen partnerships across agencies, sectors, and jurisdictions is a priority for Commissioner Fish. Our goal of creating a world-class system of parks, trails, and natural areas won't be achieved without this collaboration.

Find out more at oregonmetro.gov, and also check out the great presentation we saw at Council.

My statement on the Cesar Chavez street renaming vote

 

July 8, 2009

I would like to first acknowledge all the parties involved in this debate for what has been, for the most part, a process marked by respect rather than by confrontation. I have received hundreds of emails and letters from Portlanders. I have read many of them, and listened to all the testimony.

It is clear to me that most people agree that Cesar E. Chávez is a national hero worthy of an appropriate public honor. His legacy extends to workers rights, civil rights, environmental justice, equality, peace, and nonviolence.

Locally, people have proposed naming bridges, parks, schools, and buildings in his honor. But that is not the issue before us today. Currently, Portland has no formal process in place to name or rename parks, bridges, or buildings.

The issue before us today is a street naming proposal, and I disagree with those who suggest we should change the ground rules in the middle of the process. No matter how you feel about the issue, street naming is one way Portland has honored those who have made a difference in our lives – at the local and national level. The honor roll includes Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and Bill Naito.

Read my full statement in our 'News' section.

 

Single-track discussion highlighted in Portland Monthly

Commissioner Fish has taken on the question of single-track, off-road biking in Portland by convening cycling enthusiasts and conservationists alike to find a solution.

Commissioner Fish is committed to finding a mutually-agreeable solution to the single-track question in Portland's parks.

July 6, 2009

Though widely recognized for its singular friendliness to cyclists, Portland has very little to offer mountain bike enthusiasts in the way of "single-track" trails, or trails dedicated solely to mountain bikers, reports Brian Barker in the July issue of "Portland Monthly."

For over 20 years, the mountain-biking community has advocated for increased trails in Portland, and as the new Commissioner-in-Charge of the Parks Bureau, Commissioner Fish has welcomed the opportunity to engage a broad range of interested parties in this discussion.

While conservation groups have raised concerns about the impact of mountain bikes on already heavily-trafficked trails, Commissioner Fish is committed to finding a solution all stakeholders can agree on.

The Commissioner convened a stakeholder roundtable in early April to solicit opinions and suggestions, and as the conversation moves forward, the Commissioner will continue to involve a diverse group to ensure that the final plan is successful.

Thanks to BikePortland.org and their Flickr account for this photo!