Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Police Bureau

Sworn to protect. Dedicated to serve.

Phone: 503-823-0000

Non-Emergency: 503-823-3333

1111 S.W. 2nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info

PPB COVID-19 Q & A / April 3, 2020

 

Lt. Tina Jones moderates a question and answer panel with various members of the Portland Police Bureau, the Sunshine Division and Chief Jami Resch regarding how COVID-19 has impacted their work.

>> Subscription Options

Apple Spotify

StitcherGoogleAndroidRSS

 

Transcript:

Announcer:
Welcome to Talking Beat, the podcast for the Portland Police Bureau. We're focusing on thoughtful conversations that we hope we'll inform and provide you with a small glimpse of work performed by Portland Police Officers as well as issues affecting public safety in our city. Here's what's on today's show.

Chief Jami Resch:
It's a very difficult time here in Portland, but it's an amazing time too because we're seeing what everybody is capable of doing. We're seeing companies that are switching what they used to manufacture to help manufacture what is needed right now. We're seeing communities reach out across the board. People are helping their neighbors. Kids are being taught by neighborhoods and that kind of thing. So, while this is very difficult, I think it's also highlighting the best of people.

Announcer:
On this special episode, Lieutenant Tina Jones talks to various Bureau members as well as the Sunshine Division regarding how COVID-19 has impacted their work. We also hear updates from Chief Jami Resch. Thanks for listening.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Good afternoon. I'm Lieutenant Tina Jones, a public information officer with the Portland Police Bureau. The way that we're going to run the show today is I'm going to moderate a conversation with several people with different perspectives about the Portland Police Bureau's response currently during this pandemic. And at the end we'll have the Chief of Police, Jami Resch, joining us. Our first guest today is Officer Matt Jacobsen. He works with our central neighborhood response team. Thank you for being with us, Matt.

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
Absolutely. Thank you for having me.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So can you tell us just a little overview of your tenure with the Portland Police Bureau and what your assigned role is?

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
I've been a police officer 10 years. I've been with the Police Bureau for five and for the last three years I've been assigned to the neighborhood response team at Central Precinct. Each precinct has a neighborhood response team. We generally focus on supporting our patrol division through addressing livability and community safety issues. At central, we primarily do that through short to medium term investigation. So like a week to three, four weeks. Assisting patrol with calls, proactive police missions to interdict a criminal behavior and then partnering closely with our community stakeholders. That's our primary role.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
What has changed for you and your unit during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
In our focus, I said, prior to COVID was very heavily on the enforcement and on the interdiction of that criminal behavior. We still do that. We just wrapped up a three week investigation where we were able to arrest a subject who had exposed himself to some teenage girls in Southwest Portland. But we've also pivoted our focus to work with the business community and really expand upon the relationships we already have. Primarily working with those businesses that are either closed, have limited operations or otherwise significantly affected. So we've worked with like the Portland Business Alliance or the Central Eastside Industrial Council to develop an open line of communication so that if we have information we need to push out to those businesses still operating, we have a new avenue to do that.

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
And also that if they have concerns or seeing things that they want us to know, they have a way for that to happen as well. As part of that, we've also worked with the social service partners that are still operating like New Avenues for Youth or Blanchet House. We've been in regular communication with them to make sure that if they have concerns or if they have things that are changing, the Police Bureau can really do what we need to do to support them so that they continue operating and provide services to the people that really need it during this time.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's great. How are you managing that work differently?

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
On the patrol side or meeting people outside, we're taking calls via phone or kind of finding new means and new ways to do police work while really supporting that social distancing that we all talk about. I think it's just all about adaptation. From the NERC side, obviously we're using phone and email more than we did before. But for whatever role we're in, I think we realize it's really important to have uniformed officers out in our community and really projecting the fact that, hey, we're still here doing police work and we're doing what we need to do to make sure the community is safe.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of?

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
Yeah. There are two big rumors that have popped up. As I said, we have close relationships with our community stakeholders and we hear a lot that people don't think that police are responding to calls. I can assure you that Police Bureau is responding to calls and we're doing just as many investigations as we did prior to COVID. I think the thing that's different is the criteria for taking people to jail has changed a little bit. But we're still making sure we're taking the steps we need to to hold those people accountable as we go along.

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
The second thing is that we're hearing that the Police Bureau is planning a roundup of our unsheltered population. We've actually heard this directly from those people and I can tell you that is not the case. It's concerning because that kind of rumor would cause a huge level of anxiety for a population that's already in a really precarious situation. What I will tell you is that we're not doing that. We've actually shifted our focus. We've been handing out some sanitation products. We've made sure we're doing referrals so that our unsheltered population knows where to get a warm meal or a hot meal, a warm shower, or serve those other basic needs so they stay healthy. But part of that is that really asking that if our community doesn't need to be out, that they stay inside and realize that we have a segment of our population that just unfortunately doesn't have anywhere to go; so that we make sure that we help keep them healthy, that we all do our part.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Do you have any tips or ideas for how to manage stress during this crisis?

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
I'm really lucky. The neighborhood response team is a team of eight of us. Myself and several other officers. We really rely on each other for support. We do that during normal times. We rely heavily on each other to complete our mission. I translate that into relying on our family and friends which is a little different when you're doing it via phone or FaceTime. But really it's been sticking to our routine and making sure that at least from the Police Bureau side that we're communicating with our families. Most of us on my team have kids and some younger kids and this no doubt causes some pretty good anxiety. Just making sure they know what we're doing to protect ourselves in terms of keeping ourselves healthy, but also make sure that we're messaging the things we're doing to our community to know that we're still here and still doing police work. It just may be a little adapted to the current situation.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Well, I really appreciate you taking the time today and keep up the good work.

Officer Matt Jacobsen:
Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Our next guest is going to be Detective Cheryl Waddell. She works with the fraud team and will provide some information about that. Thank you Cheryl for joining us today.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Thank you for having me.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Can you tell us just a little bit about your tenure with PPB and your assigned role?

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
I was hired in 1999 and did five years patrol primarily at Central Precinct. My area patrol was Northwest neighborhood for Nob Hill and the Alphabet District. In 2004, I promoted to detective and spent five years in the sex crimes unit. I was on the Oregon Attorney General's sexual assault task force, was the lead detective for all cases involving sex offenders and was part of the Innocent Images online initiative with the FBI. And 2010, I moved over to white collar crime. I do all types of financial investigations. But my emphasis is in intellectual property. So counterfeit merchandise with emphasis in health and safety products and then also bank fraud and wire fraud.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So you have a broad experience and a lot of the things that you're currently tasked with are connected to what's going on right now. What has changed for you and your unit during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Well, what's mostly changed is that we are now kind of split in half. Half of the group is telecommuting or teleworking, whatever you want to call it, and the other half is working out of the office. With these types of complex investigations, it lends itself to working as a team. So, when you get kind of stuck or you need some suggestion on where to go next in your investigation, we often just turn to each other or we often tabletop an investigation and go, "Okay, anybody have any ideas on the best way to investigate this financial crime." So that's been fragmented because of this.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So you're collaborating just in a little different way, it sounds so.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Correct. Yeah.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So how are you managing your work differently?

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
I'm doing a lot of emails back and forth when before I would just turn around, talk to people or I had a lot of meetings with bankers and business community members. Those have all stopped. Some of them are going to some tele-meetings like Zoom and I presume some of them will also just go to conference calls. But that's all that I've been able to do is just a lot of emailing.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Yes. So is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of given the current situation?

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Yeah. When this first started, first thing I thought of was because of my counterfeit merchandise was that I was worried that people would look for counterfeit products online. I was worried that there would be other kinds of financial scams. There's all of the romance scams and all the kind of email problems. I was worried about phishing. So I wanted people to keep that in mind that all of the other scams that were out there are still out there. Now they just added another layer to it and now maybe put something to do with the COVID. And so, be really wary of any unsolicited emails, unsolicited text. Don't click on them, hover over them or just don't pay any attention to them.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Be wary of something that looks like a subscription that you might have or it might look like it's part of your bank. Only go through your trusted sources, not through what you were texted or emailed. If you have online banking and you get an email, I would go back into my platform, log on to my account and then contact the bank through that. And then finally keep an eye on your accounts. At least check them every 30 days and if you see anything suspicious, then you can dispute it right away. A lot of people don't realize if you don't dispute within 30 days, you might become financially responsible.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So it's really important to stay on top of that and pay attention.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Correct.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Yes. Do you have any tips or ideas for folks about managing stress during this crisis?

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
I personally have turned off the TV. I only watch in the morning for a very small amount of time to get updated. I get updated, of course, from the Portland Police Bureau at least at noon and then maybe at nightly news. But other than that just too much information can be overwhelming. I would suggest that people just get the basic that you need to and then kind of go on with your life inside your home. I've taken advantage of this time because I am working from home and my children are home. And so, now I get to spend a lot more time with them. Turn off the TV at night and we play board games. We've already done two puzzles. I'm just taking this time to spend with them because that's what I'm going to remember when this is all done. I'm not going to worry about, oh, I was stuck in the house. No, I will remember the fun that we had or that we tried to have.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So making the best out of the situation and having some quality time.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Exactly.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Well, we really appreciate you being here. I know that we've posted on social media some of the tips and where people can report information about possible products and things like that.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Okay. Is there one thing that I could...

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Yeah, if you had something to add.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
I wanted to add that if anyone has any questions about fraud or anything financial crimes, they can always email our detail. You can find that at whitecollarcrimes@PortlandOregon.gov, and then one of the detectives will get back to you and we can help you out. Even if it's not a crime, you just have questions, you can reach us then.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Great. Thank you so much Cheryl.

Detective Cheryl Waddell:
Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We appreciate you being here. Our next guest is Sergeant Martin Padilla. He is with our special victims unit. Thank you Martin for taking some time to come spend a few minutes with us today. So can you tell us really quick a little bit about your background with Portland Police Bureau and what your assigned role is?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
I've been with the Police Bureau for 21 years. Most of it was spent in patrol at a few detach positions with training and sword. I spent some time in NERC and and then a little over six years ago, I got promoted to Sergeant, went from North Precinct to Central Precinct. And then spent the last five years at SVU, formerly known as DVRU. We can get into that if you want to.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Yeah. So what is SVU?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
SVU, the special victims unit, it sort of evolved. Just in the five years I've been there, we've had some changes. We've had reductions like most everybody else. Initially we were DVRU, the domestic violence reduction unit, we had the gun dispossession program, we had the elder crimes and vulnerable adults units. We had four detectives and several officers assigned. We've had some reductions. We don't have as many detectives or officers, so we've had to cross train a lot of folks. We've also had the addition of having to investigate more types of major crimes than we used to. We're also have an on call unit too. If there's a major crime, we respond 24/7.

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
With the reduction in our personnel and with the need to cross train, I started looking... it's a mouthful to have all those acronyms. I looked around other agencies and SVU. While it's very television sounding, actually is a real acronym and what we do is very similar to what other agencies do that have an SVU. So, beginning January 1st we changed our name to that as it more appropriately reflects what our work is.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Thank you. That's helpful to know because your unit is helping the most vulnerable populations out there. That's especially important for what we're talking about today. How has or what has changed for you and your unit related to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Some parts of it haven't changed. That's the part I think there was some misunderstanding about. Major crimes, if they're committed... usually for us most of our major crimes are domestic violence related. We still respond. We still send our up team out and we still go make arrests and we'll interview those folks. I mean, using the safe protocols that we can, but we're still going to be out there for that. Where it's changed I would say is on the call and investigation side where it's not an immediate. Obviously a lot more telephone interviews. It's really changed on the elder crime side. We don't go into care facilities if at all possible. We do a lot of coordination with adult protective services and try to interview or gain evidence or figure out what's going on without actually going into the facilities if we can.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So you guys are trying to limit exposure both to our folks and the members of a particular community, it sounds like?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Correct.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's great. Given all that, how are you managing your work differently?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
When possible, like when we would use to go out and interview people, if we don't have to interview them in person, we don't. I would say, as most investigators know, you do get gleaned more when you're in person. But we're managing it by telephone interviews, if we can collect evidence. We don't have people come into the office anymore. This morning we've had a couple evidence collections where we meet them out in the driveway, those types of things. Whenever possible, when it's reasonable, we'll do that.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And I think we didn't touch on advocates. Let's touch on that as well. How are they doing their work differently? Because we do have advocates that are co-housed with your unit, correct?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Yes, we do. They are not coming into the office. The coordinator comes in part time to consult with me and the other Sergeant about cases, but they do not come in. However, they do still respond to the calls telephonically. In some limited cases, they might come out forward to address needs, but it's typically at a distance. But they are still available to all the officers and the domestic violence survivors during the hours that they had before. I think that some got lost early on, but we've been trying to get that message out.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Great. We've reminded our police officers that they're a resource, they just won't be coming out to the scene, but they can still talk to the survivors by phone and help them get connected to resources as well.

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Right. And if I can add one other thing, I think there was a misunderstanding too. We're co-located with the Gateway Center, which has more or less closed its doors for now. And that was a great resource for all sorts of things but the biggest one that most people know is you could do the ex parte or restraining order hearings there via video. So they're not doing that there, but they are still doing them at the court house. And that message was misunderstood at first. That has never closed. Those restraining orders are still getting issued and they're still being served.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's really good to know and we'll make sure that we connect so that we can help amplify that message out there because restraining orders can be an important tool. We discussed some numbers a couple of weeks ago. The chief will get into it a little bit more today about what we're seeing. We have not seen a reduction in domestic violence cases unfortunately, but it sounds like you guys are doing everything you can to continue those investigations when the advocates reach out. Anything you wanted to add on that?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Just that while a lot of the typical DV advocacy resources that are out there may not be able to respond as broadly as they once did, they're still out there and I think we put on our Twitter about a week ago that the National Domestic Violence Hotline is still up and running, Call to Safety, formerly known as the Portland Women's Crisis Line, they're still up. Aging and disability services, their 24 hour line is still up. Child Abuse Hotline, Multnomah County Crisis Line, they're still all up. Much like the county courthouse is up, please contact those if you need them.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And we'll continue to put those important numbers out there. Do you have any tips at the end of this to share with the public about how your folks or you are managing stress during this critical time?

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
I can't speak for how everybody else is doing it. I would say it's very similar to what Detective Waddell said. And I think it actually goes for everything, not just in COVID-19. Don't inundate yourself with the news. I mean, be aware, but the more you watch it, the more negative you're going to think. Just think of creative ways. For myself, I still have to come to work every day because of the type of crimes we investigate. But my family's spending, my wife and two daughters, they're spending a lot of time social distancing and staying in the home. But they're also, they'll go for a walk in the neighborhood because you can easily socially distance that way.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Well, thank you. We really appreciate it. You guys are doing really important work with our vulnerable communities. Have a good rest of your day.

Sergeant Martin Padilla:
Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Next we're going to have Sergeant Davis Kyle, he's with our child abuse team and he'll help us understand the latest on that. Welcome. Thanks for coming today.

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Thank you. Good afternoon.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We want a little perspective from the child abuse team. Can you tell us a little bit about your tenure with PPB and your current assignment?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Absolutely. I've been an officer with Portland for about 19 years. I'm currently assigned to the family services division and I supervise our child abuse team.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
How many detectives do you have in that unit?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Right now we have 10 total detectives and one officer assigned with us.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Awesome. What has changed for you and your unit during this COVID-19 pandemic?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
That's a good question. COVID has affected us quite a bit. Unlike other investigative units, we really depend on our community partners for help, specifically the Child Abuse Hotline. That's where most of our referrals come from. Typically those get called in by teachers, childcare workers, counselors. That's how we're aware of most of the child abuse that takes place. Unfortunately as we've heard from our partners at DHS, their call load has decreased significantly and we are definitely seeing that. Just to put in some context, those numbers pre March 19th, we would see an average of 40 to 50 reports a day that was reported to the child abuse that relates to the city of Portland. After March 19th we're averaging about 10. That's a pretty significant decrease and we are aware of that.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
I just want to clarify that, you're saying unfortunately you guys are getting less. That doesn't necessarily mean that crimes are down, like all of a sudden child abuse went away, correct?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
That's correct. Myself and my unit, we believe that the child abuse is still taking place. Unfortunately the victims of these crimes are not ones to report the crimes themselves. That's why we depend on community members to see what's going on and make those reports and that's how we get made aware of that.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Just to further touch on that, you guys would usually see an increase in reporting maybe after a holiday or after school starts again?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
That's correct.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And so, can we anticipate that potentially when life maybe resorts to a new normal after some of this, that you guys might have an increase?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Absolutely. I know that. With the assistance of our other leadership in our unit and the Police Bureau, we are anticipating unfortunately a surge of these types of cases being reported and we are preparing for that in our unit. Some of the things that we're doing, most importantly is making sure our detectives are healthy so that we're able and mentally ready for these cases. We take wellness very seriously. We want to make sure that our detectives and their families are healthy and well so we can work these cases. Specifically some of the things that we're doing is we're staggering our work schedules. Not everyone's in the building at the same time, just to hope to reduce any kind of contamination. Additionally, we're closing out all the cases. We're getting all of our reports written up. We want to make sure that we have a clean slate when things resume and we get back to normal.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
It sounds like you are sort of managing your work differently to get caught up and get ready for what might be a surge.

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Absolutely.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Related to that, is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of? Can people still report child abuse? How do they do that?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Yes, you can absolutely still call the child abuse hotline and make reports. With the increased online presence of our kids from doing e-learning and finishing school at home, our kids are going to be online a lot more. And as our partners at the FBI have mentioned, this inadvertently could pose some risk to our children. So what we're asking is for parents or guardians, please monitor your kids' activity, be aware of that and if you notice anything suspicious please notify the CyberTipline and you can report that as well as calling the Child Abuse Hotline.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's really a good point because with everything going electronic or on the internet, more and more people are on there. So, unfortunately that would be a ripe opportunity for someone to take advantage of kids.

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Absolutely. I do want the public to know that we do have two detectives assigned specifically to those internet crimes. So we are also prepared for those reports to come in.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's good to know. And just to wrap up, do you have any tips to share about managing stress during this time of crisis?

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Yeah, absolutely. I know some games that I play with my kids with the increased online presence is just play the what if game. Just role play with your kids and ask what if a stranger tried to talk to you on the internet, how would you respond? Get your kids prepared for this when this happens and make sure that they feel confident to let you know that they've been approached by a stranger online. There's a couple of websites that are available that have great resources for parents to go to. Specifically it's called missingkids.org. There's great resources for kids and parents of all ages. And if you have the time, go through that resource together with your kids. There's videos, there's games. It's a great place to go for resources.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's a really good idea. Well, thank you. We really appreciate your time today and we appreciate those really difficult investigations that your team does.

Sergeant Davis Kile:
Thank you for your time.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Thank you. Next we're going to have an opportunity to talk to Lieutenant Casey Hettman. He is the lieutenant with our behavioral health unit. Hi Casey. Thank you for joining us today. Can you tell us a little bit about your tenure and your current assigned role with the Portland Police Bureau?

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Sure, yeah. My name is Casey Hettman. I'm currently the lieutenant that oversees the behavioral health unit here at the Portland Police Bureau. I've been with the Bureau for over 13 years and spent the majority of my time on patrol in that capacity. But in the last three years I've been in the behavioral health unit and for the last year and a half I've been serving as the lieutenant overseeing it.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Just quickly if you could define what the behavioral health unit is or what type of work happens there.

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Sure. Our mission is really to coordinate the response of law enforcement with the wider behavioral health systems that our community operates within. To that end, we have five co-responder teams that are comprised of a police officer, a partner with a full-time mental health clinician. We receive referrals from patrol and other sources here in the Police Bureau to reach out and work with individuals within our community that are needing a little bit more assistance due to mental health concerns.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's a very unique unit that you have. And so, I imagine that there are some unique things that have been happening during this pandemic. What has changed for you and your unit during the COVID-19 crisis?

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Yeah. To make sure that we're first and foremost keeping all of our employees safe so we can best serve the wider public in the community. We've scaled back our in-person staffing within the unit. Non-sworn professional staff are all working remotely as our full-time clinicians are working in a remote capacity as well. And we've also been mindful to make sure that we're not having too many officers in the office at any one given time as well. We have scaled that back as well to where we're rotating officers who are physically in the office and others that are working remotely just to be mindful of that.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Can you give some examples of how you're managing your work and then how your team's managing their work differently given the situation?

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Yeah. Technology is our friend. It's become a staple in how we're keeping in contact and navigating these challenging times for sure. It's a lot of more frequent phone contacts between obviously the patrol officers and their clinician partners and our weekly and biweekly meetings that we're using to coordinate amongst ourselves. But then also our invaluable community partners and stakeholders. Those have moved into like a more of an online space. We're using telecommuting applications and phone calls to make sure that those critical connections are still happening.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And can you provide an example. I know the other day you were telling me about an example of connecting with the community differently. Like how one of your team members might be doing so.

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Yeah. We have clients that come from all walks of life obviously and have different barriers and struggles too in terms of their mental health. Some of our clients need maybe a higher level of contact, they might need more frequent basis. I know for some of our individuals that have really thrived on having in-person contacts with our teams, our teams have had to think somewhat outside the box to make sure that's still happening and we're taking care of our people. And so, we've had some officers that have actually driven to individuals' residences and called them on the phone but have remained either on the sidewalk or from their vehicle so that the person inside can still see them, that they can have that visual connection while they're still kind of distant at least having that phone conversation. So we're trying to think of new ways to do things.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
That's Awesome. Is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of during this time?

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Sure. Yeah. We are still taking referrals and we're still doing our work in the BHU. We understand that mental health is a big concern at this time where people are experiencing new feelings and having some challenges navigating these uncharted territories. And so, with that we are still staffed up. We're doing the same work we've been doing. But I also want to point out that there are some really valuable resources in the community that people can still lead on and reach out to if they need. Cascadia has a 24 hour... sorry, a seven day a week, 12 hour a day from 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM an urgent walk in clinic at Southeast 42nd division. Folks that are either themselves or have a loved one that's having a mental health concern or a crisis, they can utilize services there. The County Crisis Line is also available, (503) 988-4888 and then also the national suicide prevention hotline is 1-800-273-8255, and those are great resources as well.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We really appreciate your time today and the important work that your team is doing.

Lieutenant Casey Hettman:
Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Thank you. Next, we're going to have an opportunity to talk to our records manager, Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed. A little fun fact about her. It's actually her second anniversary with the Police Bureau. Welcome Jen. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Hi.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Can you tell us a little bit about your tenure with the Portland Police Bureau and your assigned role? Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Yeah. Like you mentioned, today is my two year anniversary with PPB, which is really exciting. I am the manager of the records division. I like to think of the records division as the memory of the Bureau. We process all the police reports that our officers are writing. We're working with national law enforcement databases and we also provide copies of police reports to members of the public.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
This is a lot of behind the scenes stuff that keeps us running that a lot of people don't really know or think about. It's not the stuff always covered in TV shows about policing. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Absolutely.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
What has changed for your unit during this COVID-19 pandemic? Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: We, like everybody else, are focusing on flattening the curve. That means that about half of our staff are in the office on any given day and the other half are actually staying at home like much of the public is. And so, because of that, we are a little bit slower with some of the nonessential tasks. But one thing that I think is important to highlight that hasn't changed is our dedication to public service. Like you mentioned, we are here supporting the mission of our officers to provide public safety services to the public. That applies to all of the professional staff in the Bureau. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Records is still making sure the missing persons get entered into databases. Our business services group is still making sure that our employees are getting paid so they can continue to contribute to the local economy. They're also making sure that we're getting supplies we need. Our property and evidence division is working to get property that was stolen back to its rightful owners. And then our janitors are keeping everything really clean in our facilities so that we all stay healthy.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
How are you and your team working differently? Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Like I mentioned, about half of our folks are actually in the office. About half of the ones who are at home are able to telework now. That's a really great advantage that is helping us try to keep up with our work. We're focusing on the most essential functions of our work. So there are some things that are being triaged when we are focusing on things. Like I said, we're making sure the missing persons get entered into databases. We're working with the Multnomah County district attorney's office to make sure the defendants are still getting a fair and speedy trial. We're making sure that police reports involving child abuse are again sent over to Oregon DHS so that those can be adequately investigated.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So a lot of really critical functions for things that do have to go over, like if someone's arrested, those reports have to be timely. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Yeah, absolutely.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of? Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: I think the thing that we most want the public to know is that we're trying our hardest. We ask for their patience. Like everybody else, we're trying to figure out how to adapt to this ongoing situation. One of the things that I think is really important that people are aware of is there's some things that they can do to actually get faster service from the Police Bureau. A lot of people don't know that the quickest way to get a police report taken is actually to go online and submit a police report themselves. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: People can do that at PortlandOregon.gov/police and you can submit a police report for a hit and run if there's no injury. You can also submit a police report if you are the victim of identity theft, or if say your car was broken into and property was stolen. As soon as we process that report, you'll get a copy, which is really handy because then you can give it to your insurance company if you need it for a claim. Another thing you can do at PortlandOregon.gov/police is you can also request a copy of a police report that was taken by an officer.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Awesome. Well, thanks for those tips. That's all the time we have for now, but we appreciate getting the records perspective. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Great. Thank you so much.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
All right, and happy second year anniversary with the Police Bureau. Manager Jenn Hollandsworth-Reed: Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Next we're going to have Captain Craig Dobson. He was the first person who led our incident management team and he's also currently the captain at the training division. So we'll get his perspective here. Welcome Captain Dobson.

Captain Craig Dobson:
Good afternoon.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Can you tell us a little bit about your tenure with PPB and what your current assigned role is?

Captain Craig Dobson:
Sure. I'm rolling into my 21st year, actually into my 22nd year of police work. I've had a variety of roles and currently I'm the captain of the training division as well as the coordinator for our IMT, our incident management teams as well as our incident commanders.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We'll kind of get a couple of quick perspectives about what has changed for you and those two teams during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Captain Craig Dobson:
Sure. One of the things that we're doing right now is we have two teams that were rotating every 14 days. The teams are basically managing the incident. Their focus is on taking all the information in that comes in on a daily basis and providing information out to our officers of what they need to know, managing all of the supplies and the equipment that our officers need as well as tracking the finance piece of it. The final piece that we're focused on is the absenteeism. So if our officers started to get sick, we've got some setup, some triggers or contingencies so that we can put other officers out onto the street to ensure that the streets stay safe.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Awesome. And then for training, some things have changed out there as well?

Captain Craig Dobson:
Yes. Normally we do all of our training face-to-face and that can't happen right now. My team, I've got a great team and they have worked at retooling entirely how they do training. And so, right now we have 21 people who are trying to become officers who are down at the Basic Academy. Basic Academy is closed right now. And so, we're teaching them remotely right now to get them up to speed with the advanced Academy type stuff. And then also we've got new hires that we have just hired on who can't go to the Academy because it's closed and we have farmed them out to help with the Sunshine Division at this point in time.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So they're getting unique experience and training just in a little different capacity right now until things maybe reset?

Captain Craig Dobson:
Yes.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Is there anything related to your work that you think the public should be aware of?

Captain Craig Dobson:
I think the most important thing is we're all in this together. We all have a role in making it through this period of time. And I think it's important that the public knows that they can do as much as we can to help others; reaching out and checking on their neighbors, checking on their family members, particularly those that are elderly or that are isolated to ensure that they're doing okay and that they're safe, that they have the supplies that they need so that they can live comfortably through this period of time.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Well, we appreciate you taking the time today. You've got two different hats that you're wearing, so keep up the great work.

Captain Craig Dobson:
Thanks.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Thank you. So next we're going to shift gears a little bit. I've got a guest from the Sunshine Division here, Kyle Camberg, and he's going to give us a little perspective about Sunshine Division. Hi, Kyle.

Kyle Camberg:
Hi there. Thank you for having me.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
This is Kyle Camberg with the Sunshine Division. So Kyle, for those who may not be familiar, what is the Sunshine Division and how is it connected to the Portland Police Bureau?

Kyle Camberg:
It was actually founded and started by the Portland Police Bureau in the early 1920s, approximately 1923. Sort of the origin story of a few different ways police officers started getting food and clothing out to the community in need in Goose Hollow, a couple of blocks from here. Christmas Eve in 1923, it was one of the starts of that. In the 1960s, Sunshine Division was incorporated as a 501(c)(3). And now we fast forward 60 or so years later and we have a small civilian staff. I'm the executive director. We have a team of about 15 staff members. We have two physical buildings here in town. One is over by the Moda Center, one is over by David Douglas High School that community members can come and access food at.

Kyle Camberg:
We still uniquely work with Portland Police Bureau just like we did almost a hundred years ago where Sunshine Division food boxes are in all the precincts. In fact, when I came in today, some were being dropped off because it's been quite busy. We have a program called our Izzy's Kids program, which is sort of better known as Shop With a Cop. We were about 500 kids a year ago. School go shopping with Portland police officers, so we fundraise that and we pair a volunteer police officer with a low income child. And then just like back in 1923 but slightly different, we still do a huge holiday food box distribution and two Portland police precincts are a part of that. Nearly 4,000 families got a hearty holiday meal. The Police Bureau is a major logistics supporter of that because that is quite an undertaking for a small nonprofit. We still do a lot together but we are a charity and so we work in concert to help people.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Awesome. Given the current need and the current state of the world, what has changed for Sunshine Division in recent weeks?

Kyle Camberg:
I have to almost exhale before I start that. It has been unlike anything I've seen before. I'm coming up this summer on my ninth year as the executive director. It is busier than we have ever seen. It's not even close. I started at the end of the recession and it is more than four times busier than we would normally see in terms of the amount of people that are coming to us directly for food. The other part that is, it's not surprising but it is startling, is how many people are reaching out both to us at Sunshine Division and also to you through the non-emergency line to access those food boxes that we have in the precincts in the contact offices.

Kyle Camberg:
I know from talking to the chief that those numbers were up about eight times over what you normally see. A lot of people don't know that but for decades... I mean, I've seen footage from the 1950s. Police officers have had food baskets or food boxes today that they can take out to families or individuals in crisis when they're on a call. Well, now we have this new crisis so there's literally thousands of people who can't or should not or are fearful of leaving their home because of the crisis. Also, there's huge populations of people who have recently become unemployed and they didn't see that coming. And so, the volume of calls we're getting from people who can't leave their home, it is staggering and frankly it's scary. That's one of the things we've been working on for about the past two weeks is how are we going to respond to that?

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And how are people reaching out for help?

Kyle Camberg:
They're calling us and they're emailing us. If you go to our website, SunshineDivision.org, on our contact page, we've got, essentially it's a get help button and that's an email. Those actually come directly to my inbox. So I see those every day. A month ago, that would have been a couple of day maybe. Now it's five, six, seven an hour. Just while I was waiting to come in the interview today, I think I had five or six. I would say on an average, I'm getting somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 to 50 a day with people with questions.

Kyle Camberg:
It's people from all walks of life. It's not just sort of people who had normally needed a little bit of help. It's people who have recently lost their job. It's caretakers. It's people my age who maybe have parents that are in their 70s and older that are worried about not allowing them to get out of the house because they shouldn't leave for fear of the virus. It's other nonprofits that work with medically fragile people and work with senior citizens. So we're getting hit from all sorts of walks of life from people saying, "Can you help us? Can you help us get food to people who can't leave their home?"

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And how do they access food?

Kyle Camberg:
Anyone can come to our two facilities. We've changed our entire model. It used to be a food pantry, a room about the size of the one we're in here where people went and shopped. About a month ago we had to suspend our volunteer activities and we had essentially to close the building because we kind of got ahead of this and saw this coming. So we've changed just specifically to emergency food boxes. What we're doing is we're serving those outside of our building, essentially with a barrier between our staff and between the clients that come to us. And so, it's a safe environment. It's open air. Neither the people accessing nor our staff have to get within about 15 feet of each other.

Kyle Camberg:
And so, people can pick up a box. It's no questions asked. It's one box a week per household. So if someone comes up, there's no paperwork, there's no filling... this is not the DMV. It's, "Do you need some food?" "Great. Here it is," and off you go. And so, it's a very safe, simple, easy environment for people. For anyone who cannot access, we have the precinct boxes and that's kind of one of the things we're going to talk about today is the expansion of that.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Yeah. And we'll come back to that. But people are still able to call the non-emergency line-

Kyle Camberg:
Correct.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
... and an officer can bring one out, and then we'll talk about some other options in a minute. How is the community support for Sunshine Division right now?

Kyle Camberg:
It's unprecedented times. One, a lot of groups that are supporters have really stepped up financially, which is amazing. But we have these other two challenges that we talked about. One is, we're a small nonprofit so we rely heavily on volunteers and we've had essentially to turn our volunteers away and that makes life hard for us, whether it's sorting food or working with the clients or distributing food. We had dozens of volunteers in our buildings every day and we don't have that anymore. The other part that's really challenging is, almost all of the food we distribute is donated. Very little of it is actually purchased. But many of the ways food is donated no longer exist anymore. We can't put our food barrels into offices and churches and schools. And so, we're really asking the public to help support that financially because we're going to have to go out and buy food for the short term now because all those normal streams of food donations just aren't appropriate anymore.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And if people want to help out, all that information is on your website?

Kyle Camberg:
Yeah.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
It sounds like a couple of local community businesses have stepped up in a big way.

Kyle Camberg:
There's been a number of groups that have really stepped up about a week ago. Advantis Credit Union helped us host a telethon that raised over $60,000 on KATU, which was amazing. And as we're going to talk about it in a minute, the Fred Meyer Foundation and Safeway Albertson's Foundation have made tremendous gifts that allow us to expand our offerings as well. So people are stepping up. They know the work we do is critical and that's the best. I get that question a lot, is how can I help? Normally I would ask people if they'd like to volunteer or host a food drive or give financially. Unfortunately the first two aren't an option right now. So giving financially allows us to do all of these things.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
I think we've teased us enough. You've got some big news that you wanted to share about a new opportunity. It sounds like you guys are being very innovative in trying to address the situation as it's changed and you've got some exciting news that you want to share.

Kyle Camberg:
Yeah, I'm extremely proud and excited of the collaboration. It really it's a collaboration between a lot of people with Sunshine Division kind of in the middle of it. But modeling after how we have the home delivery of boxes from the precincts, what we were seeing is just there's so many people that we needed to do an expansion of that home delivery model. And so, in working with the Bureau, as was mentioned right before me, there's a number of new hires and other people whose jobs are sort of changing or in limbo a little bit. We've been able to work with you to get more officers to support the home delivery. We're working with each to see productions, to do the logistics in a sort of third warehouse that's offsite. So we're not mixing a new program with our existing staff for fear of people being ill.

Kyle Camberg:
And then Fred Meyer, Zero Hunger Zero Waste and Safeway Albertson's Foundation have put in very large gifts to allow us to get this off the ground. I'm proud to announce that effective Monday we are going to start home delivering 1000 food boxes per week for a minimum of the next 10 weeks with the help of all those groups and being home delivered primarily by the Portland Police Bureau officers. And so, it's an amazing collaboration. Basically that's about 27,000 meals because a box contains multiple meals. About 27,000 meals a week that are going to go out. And like I said, about 10 weeks from now we will have home delivered to 10,000 households.

Kyle Camberg:
If anyone goes to our website, we now have a pop up that says, would you like to get a home delivery? If you're in Portland or Gresham, you go in and you fill out. Basically it's a Google form so that we know where to deliver it. No one is going to come in your house. They're going to knock on the door, they're going to drop the box off and it's no questions asked. It's turnkey, it's free and it's for anyone who can't or should not leave their home right now because of the virus. And so, we want to be responsive to that because, again, this is a crisis we've never seen before.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Well, that's really exciting. And I know we have a press release so that'll be going out with some more details here shortly to highlight that for our media folks. But 1,000 boxes, do you say a day, a week?

Kyle Camberg:
It will be a week. So Monday through Friday, 200 a day. We've turned into kind of a-

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
My mind is blown here.

Kyle Camberg:
It's kind of Uber Eats if you will, from the nonprofit side.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
For the critical time, yeah.

Kyle Camberg:
We want people to sign up for this. We want them to know that this is a resource. It's much needed for anyone. Whatever that reason, whether it's financial, whether it's illness, whether because you're a caretaker. I mean, one of the stories I shared with you, I had a single parent tell me they're medically fragile and they're terrified to go out because what if they get sick, who's going to take care of their children? And I get all sorts of emails like that. I get all sorts of calls like that and it's heartbreaking.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And we can help take care of that by signing up. So we'll get that information out. We really appreciate your time today and thanks for always being a good partner with us.

Kyle Camberg:
Appreciate. Thank you.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So next we're going to have some time with Chief Resch and get the latest from her perspective. Hi chief. Thanks for coming.

Chief Jami Resch:
Yeah, absolutely.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We had a whole host of perspectives that we talked about today and we're just wanting to kind of share what the latest is on the Portland Police Bureau staffing situation now that we're about a month into the COVID-19 situation here.

Chief Jami Resch:
Right. I know that's been a question a lot of people have asked and I get asked that a lot in various meetings, how we're doing as far as staffing is concerned. Our incident management team closely monitors our staffing levels every day so we're very on top of it. I'm happy to report that right now we are holding steady with our sick leave usage. It's not going up, it's kind of average for what we would normally see this time of year, which is very good news. We are aware that some Bureau members been tested for COVID-19. However, we are unaware of any Bureau member who has tested positive.

Chief Jami Resch:
Like I said, our emergency management team continues to monitor this every day. We do have some contingencies, so if we do have folks who start to become ill or need to be quarantined for a reason or another, we are preparing for that. I'd also like to highlight that we still are responding to all calls for service, but again, maybe in a different fashion. May either be by phone, we may ask you to report it online, we may ask you to step outside to talk to an officer. And just to also kind of reiterate, I know we've sent out some stuff in the media previously about officers who may be wearing differing types of respirators or different types of masks when they show up. Just so the public is aware that the officers may look a little bit different when they do show up in person, but we are still responding to calls for service.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
We talked to the media a couple of weeks ago and I was just wondering what changes have been implemented in the last two weeks? It seems like things are changing at lightning speed these days.

Chief Jami Resch:
Yes. It seems like every day we're trying to make a little bit of an adaption to figure out how we can provide better services, not only to the community but from the chief's office down to the officer level as far as how we are able to communicate. I know in one of the earlier press releases we put out that we had suspended roll calls. And that was very difficult on our officers or sergeants, anybody that's working in operations because it's a critical form of communication that we use. It's a way that I am able to convey things down to the street decisions that I'm making, reasons for those decisions. And when that line is cut, it can cause a lot of confusion and frustration.

Chief Jami Resch:
We've been able to recently come up with different forms of video conferencing so that the officers and the sergeants and the captains and commanders, everybody can actually hold a virtual roll call. I've been able to participate in two of those in the last two days. They've actually been very helpful. Gotten a couple of questions from officers that I was able to answer right away. But it's definitely kind of brought back that communication. People I think felt a little isolated when they weren't able to do that. We've been using that video conferencing, different platforms and stuff for many meetings throughout the Bureau for the last week or so and it's been really helpful to kind of keep us on track.

Chief Jami Resch:
I know that, I think new hires have been mentioned a couple of times. In fact, we did hire a few people last week and we've been able to use them in various forms, one with the Sunshine Division. We have some folks that are helping with records. We also have some folks helping in our forensics evidence division. Our Advanced Academy in addition to... I guess I kind of spoke a little bit out of order.

Chief Jami Resch:
Our Advanced Academy is also being taught online right now thanks to different video conferencing platforms. So that's been helpful. Our folks that are in the Academy are not behind and hopefully they will be out on the street in the same amount of time we thought they were going to be. One of the biggest things also is we are asking our employees to continue to disinfect not only their vehicles but their workspaces when they arrive to work and when they leave to try and really reinforce trying to keep everything clean so we're keeping everybody safe.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
There's been a lot of interest in the public and in the media about crime rates and crime trends. What can you share on that front?

Chief Jami Resch:
Obviously that's another thing that we're messaging and I know that I've put out some stats related to two different types, but we are looking at that on a daily basis. Today I'd just like to talk about, as far as traffic crashes are concerned, we have seen a decline in the number of traffic crashes, especially since the school was closed. A lot less people are out on the road. So we have seen a significant decline in traffic crashes. I think it's around 30% since the school's closed. For the last few weeks of March, our traffic citations in general are lower as far as low level speeding, but what I'd like to highlight is what we are seeing, which is a very dangerous trend and one I would like to see end very quickly, is we are seeing increased citations for those either going 21 miles to 30 miles over or even greater over the speed limit, which is something we don't see a lot of, but we have definitely seen an increase in that.

Chief Jami Resch:
And what I'd like to highlight to people is traffic laws are still in place and they will be enforced by the traffic officers. Driving that speed at any time, any day is just as dangerous, whether there's one person on the road or a hundred people on the road. So I really want to stress to folks, please, please, please slow down and obey all of our traffic laws. We were able to report on some of our domestic violence calls for service. They are up about 15% from the three week period prior to the governor's order.

Chief Jami Resch:
So we are seeing an increase in that. When I say 15%, it's difficult because sometimes any increase is important to note and we want to make sure that everybody who is experiencing domestic violence realizes that there's resources out there and we will put those on our website. We'll continue to reinforce those so that they know that there's help available. But when you say 15%, that's a difference of about maybe eight or 10 calls. But every single one of those is very important and we want to highlight that we are seeing that increase. We want to be of assistance. So if you are experiencing any type of violence, please do not hesitate to call 911. We absolutely will respond.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
And then can you touch on, I know at the press event a couple of weeks ago you mentioned that we'd had seen an increase in suicide calls or calls where there was a suicide threat indicated. Can you give us an update on that?

Chief Jami Resch:
Yes. I did report for the first couple of weeks after the order was given that we did see an uptake in those types of calls. What I'm having to say now is that they have actually halved in the amount in the last couple of weeks. What I'm hopeful for is that people are realizing that there's resources out there, that the information that we did put out, that the county put out was helpful to people who are in need. We will continue to put that out. I would also like to stress again to reach out to your friends, your family, your neighbors. Just check in with folks, see how they're doing. This type of situation that we're in now impacts everybody very differently and we need to realize that we need to be checking on each other, supporting each other. And I think that's where you're going to see the decrease in the number of these types of calls. I'm hoping that people are getting the help that they need.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Any other calls that you want to highlight that might be of note?

Chief Jami Resch:
Well, I would like to highlight that while a lot of everything that we've been talking about is COVID related, however the Portland Police Bureau is still responding to every type of call that we normally respond to. And over the last couple of weeks they've made some fairly significant arrest. There was a homicide suspect arrest, a burglary suspect arrest and many others that I could probably sit here and highlight over and over. But I want the public to realize that it's not just the COVID-19 that the Police Bureau is responding to. We are still your Portland Police Bureau and we are responding to every call for service that we did prior to this.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
So chief, you are in a very unique position to be able to see what's happening within the Bureau and the community. Can you give us some examples of some of the things that you're seeing from your perspective?

Chief Jami Resch:
Well, I think one of the things that's, I guess, most impressive to me or kind of like what I'm most proud of is the fact that our officers and our professional staff have continued to come to work every day and provide excellent service. They're finding creative solutions to answering calls for service that we haven't seen before. Our traffic division has come up with a way to record some of the things that they would normally just read. So if they have to have a mask on, it's already prerecorded. The officers are trying to be as creative as possible, but still giving that personal touch that they know that the community is really looking for.

Chief Jami Resch:
I know that we had Sunshine Division in here earlier and I think that's something very positive to highlight. We are seeing on average about seven more calls per day to the Bureau for food boxes. It's a critical thing that we need to be assisting with. And I think that highlights just how impactful this is across the board to everybody. So the officers are responding to that and they're delivering these food boxes. And I think as mentioned, it sounds like we're going to start delivering a few more here very soon.

Chief Jami Resch:
I've seen a lot of our community members step up. We have some of our advisory council members who have offered to translate some of our messaging that we're trying to put out in the various languages that they speak, which is just been immensely helpful to get our message out to as many people as possible. A lot of businesses and just anybody who has been able to has donated supplies to first responders, which I think is amazing when people are realizing that we truly are the people who are out there every day and they really do want to support us.

Chief Jami Resch:
I'm getting lots of messages of; how can I help, how can I help? And I think probably one thing you've noticed when Sunshine Division was speaking is people want to volunteer and that's very hard to do right now. So we're trying to look for ways that people can help but still be safe. Every night there's the, I think it's at seven o'clock, where everybody comes out and cheers for first responders. I think that's amazing. I've been seeing more and more people doing that. I think it just gives people, one, an opportunity to go outside, see your neighbors for a few minutes; but come together as a community and say, "We do support those of us that are out there working."

Chief Jami Resch:
It's a very difficult time here in Portland, but it's an amazing time too because we're seeing what everybody is capable of doing. We're seeing companies that are switching what they used to manufacture to help manufacture what is needed right now. We're seeing communities reach out across the board. People are helping their neighbors. Kids are being taught by neighborhoods and that kind of thing. While this is very difficult, I think it's also highlighting the best of people.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
Chief, we really appreciate your time today.

Chief Jami Resch:
Absolutely.

Lieutenant Tina Jones-Moderator:
I think that it's important for the public to have frequent updates about what we're doing, especially with a lot of the things behind the scene in the latest situation. So thank you for taking the time. Have a good day.

Chief Jami Resch:
Absolutely. Yeah, thank you.

Announcer:
Thanks for listening to the Talking Beat. Do you have a question for us? You can call and leave us a message on our dedicated voicemail line at (971) 339-8868 or send us an email to talkingbeat@portlandoregon.gov. If you've enjoyed this episode, please share with your friends. More episodes can be found at our website, PortlandOregon.gov/police/podcast.