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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer


503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Release: Commissioner Dan Saltzman and PBOT join the Chinese American Citizens Alliance to dedicate new plaque commemorating the contributions of Portland's early Chinese settlers

(September 15, 2017) Today, Commissioner Dan Saltzman and PBOT Director Leah Treat joined representatives of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge and members of Portland's Chinese American community to dedicate a new plaque in the heart of the city's original Chinatown. The plaque, a gift to the city from the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge, commemorates the contributions of Portland's early Chinese settlers. 

old chinatown plaque

Between 1863 and 1900, there were over 5,000 Chinese living, working and doing business on SW 2nd Avenue between Taylor and Burnside, the City's original Chinatown. The plaque, designed by urban designer Suenn Ho, recognizes the contributions of these early settlers and memorializes their history for future generations.

"The Chinese American community has a long and storied history in Portland," said Commissioner Dan Saltzman. "The plaque commemorates this rich history and we deeply appreciate this gift to Portland."

chinatown plaque

“Our streets are one of our largest public spaces. At PBOT, we want these spaces to enhance our neighborhoods and serve our communities,” said PBOT Director Leah Treat. “So we were very happy to support this project. The plaque is a beautiful way to mark the significant contributions of past generations of Chinese Americans to our city and preserve this rich history for Portlanders and visitors alike.” 

“I would like to quote Alan Spears of National Park Conservation Association who said, ‘The absence of our people in the historical landscape of our country is in itself a civil rights matter,’ said Helen Ying, Portland Lodge Board Director and Old Town Chinatown Community Association Chair.  “We are simply elated to gift the bronze plaque to the City and mark the history and contributions of the Chinese American community to Portland."  Betty Jean Lee, Portland Lodge Board Director, added, "It has taken over a century to finally have the first Chinese community in Oregon documented. Now we can share it with the whole world.”

The plaque was installed by PBOT Maintenance and Operations personnel and can be seen on the corner of SW 2nd Avenue and Pine Street.

 

 About the Portland Bureau of Transportation: PBOT is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation.

About the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge: The Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge is a chapter of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance National Lodge. C.A.C.A. National was founded in 1895 in San Francisco against the backdrop of rampant racial discrimination toward Chinese Americans. The Portland chapter was established in 1921. It has a three-fold mission to develop leadership, service the community and promote civil rights.

 PBOT CACA logos

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SE Holgate Boulevard from SE 41st Avenue to SE 43rd Avenue, September 14-19

(September 13, 2017)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements on SE Holgate Boulevard from SE 41st Avenue to SE 43rd Avenue will require lane closures beginning Thursday, September 14 and continuing through Tuesday, September 19, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. each work day.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave .26 lane miles of pavement.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

News Blog: Visit PBOT's online open house to learn about the Bicycle Parking Code Update

examples of bike parking

Examples of different types of bike parking currently offered in Portland. Photos by Portland Bureau of Transportation.

(Sept. 12, 2017) It’s been 20 years since the City of Portland’s Bicycle Parking Code was written and adopted. At the time, the city’s bicycle commute mode split was only 1.2 percent. Today that number has quadrupled to 7 percent, making Portland the city with the highest bike commute rate among major cities in the United States. With that in mind, the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has been working with a stakeholder advisory committee for the past year and a half on an update to the Bicycle Parking Code requirements, in Title 33. The code language regulates the required amount, location, and design of visitor (short-term) and resident/commuter (long-term) bicycle parking spaces for new and redeveloped buildings in Portland. It is our goal that this update will bring our bicycle parking code up to current standards and to help ensure there is adequate, safe and convenient parking for people who ride a bicycle around Portland.

The Bicycle Parking Stakeholder Advisory Committee is comprised of representatives from the development community, bicycle advocates, Portland neighborhoods, Transportation Management Associations, and partner City bureaus, including Bureau of Development Services and Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The committee provides direction and recommendations to the PBOT Director, and subsequently, to other City Bureaus who will write the actual code language during the next phase of the project.

"Adequate, convenient and usable parking for a variety of bikes and cyclists is an important enabler for the higher bicycle mode shares called for in all our key plans,” said Chris Smith, a member of the Bicycle Parking Stakeholder Advisory Committee.

Over the last 18 months, the stakeholder advisory committee developed a set of recommendations that will be considered in the formal code update process. These recommendations include:

  • Update the amount of required short- and long-term bicycle parking to align with City goals
  • Increase flexibility in projects, including: 1) The allowance for reduced spacing for rack placement and inclusion of space-saving rack design and 2) a hierarchy of bicycle parking location standards and guidance
  • Inclusion of standards to address the usability and accessibility of bicycle racks for all users
  • Increase long-term bicycle parking security standards

If you are interested in diving deeper into the specific details of these recommendations and provide your feedback, visit the Bicycle Parking Online Open House. The open house will be available through Monday, September 25.

Otherwise, if you have any questions about the Bicycle Parking Code Update Project, please contact Liz Hormann, elizabeth.hormann@portlandoregon.gov, or 503-823-5086.

News Release: Moshow the Cat Rapper and the Portland Bureau of Transportation debut new music video "Parking Kitty"

Parking Kitty ad

(Sept. 12, 2017) The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Portland artist Moshow the Cat Rapper debuted a new rap and music video today called “Parking Kitty”, after the City’s new parking app, to encourage Portlanders to download and use the app for a more streamlined parking experience.

Portland’s embrace of Parking Kitty in its first four months has exceeded expectations. Users have given the application rave reviews on both the App Store and Google Play and 6 percent of all parking transactions are now being done through the app. By using the Parking Kitty app, users can take advantage of paying for their parking session with their debit and credit cards. In addition to paying for their parking sessions, people parking can receive ‘meow’ alerts when sessions are low on time, extend parking sessions remotely, view and manage parking history and multiple car sessions, and receive email receipts.

Parking Kitty can be used in all of the City of Portland’s parking districts, including Downtown, Northwest, Marquam Hill, the Lloyd District and the Central Eastside Industrial District as well as at Washington Park. Portland State University will officially open the app for use in its parking garages in time for students to arrive for the new school year, which begins Sept. 25.

Parking Kitty music video on YouTube

 

The Parking Kitty music video features Moshow and his cat, Ravioli, driving and dancing in front of a 1956 Chevrolet Nomad while PBOT parking enforcement officers and Transportation Director Leah Treat dance in the background. The video was filmed and directed by Matt Giraud of Gyroscope Pictures in the RiverPlace district in Downtown Portland. The Parking Kitty rap and video were written and edited by Moshow. The video can be viewed online here: https://youtu.be/W4Hxewc_64M

“Moshow is quintessentially Portland and his love for cats was a perfect match for our new app,” said Transportation Director Leah Treat, “We are thrilled with this partnership and hope it inspires more Portlanders to take advantage of the receipt-free parking offered by Parking Kitty.”

“Washington Park has experienced excellent adoption of Parking Kitty, with nearly 9 percent of all transactions being completed via the app,” said Victor Sanders, Program Specialist at Portland Parks & Recreation. “Visitors to the Park no longer need to cut short a visit when taking their cats to smell the roses at the Rose Garden, finding their cat-like zen at the Japanese Garden or viewing the majestic wild cats at the Oregon Zoo – they simply add more time using their phone.”

“PSU supports a broad diversity of companion animals and travel modes,” says Ian Stude, Director of Transportation and Parking Service at Portland State University. “With roughly 4,000 parking stalls on our campus, we are excited to adopt Parking Kitty as one of our own.”

“Helping to bring the City of Portland’s vision to life through the Parking Kitty application has been enlightening,” said Bob Youakim, CEO at Passport. “The city has changed the game in how parking can be viewed and used as a tool to improve interactions within the community. It has been an honor to partner with the city on its technology initiatives in a fun and unique way.”

Portland partnered with Passport, the global leader in mobile payments for parking and transit, to develop its custom parking app, unique to the city’s cat culture.

The name Parking Kitty is a play on the meaning of kitty as a pool or reserve of money. It is also a nod to the Portland’s well-known reputation as a cat-friendly community.

The Parking Kitty app is free to download from the App Store and Google Play. People using the app can also manage their parking online at parkingkitty.com. Users will be charged a ten cent convenience fee to use the app to pay for a parking session.

About PBOT

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation 

About Moshow

Born and raised in inner Baltimore, MD, Moshow defied the odds to build a name for himself as the Internet's premiere Cat Rapper. He now calls Portland, OR his home with his 5 cats - Sushi, Tali, Mega Mam, Ravioli and Black $avage. Moshow is on a mission to inspire the world, sharing with others the lessons he has learned, to not give up on yourself and follow your dreams, no matter where they take you. www.iammoshow.com

About Passport

Passport is the industry’s leading mobile technology solution specializing in enterprise business applications and payments for the public and private sector. Passport’s product lines--parking payments, transit payments, enforcement and permit management--collectively serve to deliver dynamic tools for agencies to better connect with their communities. Its services have been adopted by over 300 agencies on over 3,000 locations globally. Passport’s mission is to reduce operational complexity and deliver intelligent data to improve decision making for its clients.

Passport is backed by a group of investors, including Grotech Ventures, Relevance Capital, and MK Capital. For more information, please visit www.passportinc.com

Download Parking Kitty today:

 Parking Kitty logo pink   Download Parking Kitty in the App Store     Download Parking Kitty in Google Play

 

Traffic Advisory: Railroad track replacement on North Columbia Boulevard between North Fiske Avenue and North Chautauqua Boulevard, September 12-22

(September 8, 2017) – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements and railroad track replacement will require the closure of North Columbia Boulevard between North Fiske Avenue and North Chautauqua Boulevard on Tuesday, September 12 through Friday, September 22, all hours and all days.

The lane closures will allow crews to replace the railroad tracks and repave the road at the railroad crossing.

Eastside access will be maintained for businesses during the project. A detour will be in place for truck traffic using North Portland Road and North Vancouver Way to Marine Drive.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.