Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info

Subscribe to RSS feed

Most Recent

View Less

Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Release: Reconnecting NW Portland under U.S. 30 grows housing, builds protected bike lanes

NW 20th Avenue project requires detours, frontage road closure to improve traffic flow, bus service, bike lanes

NW 20th Avenue LID Project Improvements Map

Red, green and blue lines show where NW Thurman St and NW 20th Avenue will be extended and reconnected, underneath the U.S. 30 overpass.

(Oct. 18, 2018) – A contractor for the Portland Bureau of Transportation has started work on a project that will reconnect Northwest Thurman Street underneath U.S. 30, reuniting two sides of Northwest Portland with modern roads and protected bike lanes in a $9.6 million project that is mostly paid for with private funding.

Construction is expected to be completed in summer 2019. A number of detours have been posted for the construction period, and some permanent changes have been installed already.

The NW 20th Avenue LID Project will reconnect the Slabtown neighborhood and Northwest Portland by extending NW 20th Avenue and NW Thurman Street at the normal street grade for the area, underneath the highway overpass. This will create a new intersection, improve traffic flow and bus service, and build a new, more efficient, route for people driving, walking and biking in this growing area.

The project paves the way for build out of the Con-way Master Plan, unlocking more than $500 million in mixed-use housing development for an area comprised mostly of surface parking lots adjacent to St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, the oldest Catholic Church in the Portland area.

"I'm glad to see the Portland Bureau of Transportation collaborating with the private sector to build protected bike lanes, new street connections and housing options," said Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, who oversees PBOT. "The NW 20th Avenue LID Project is a great example of the kind of public-private partnership that will help us manage growth. As we build more housing, it's important that we also build street improvements that make bus service faster, and make it safe and comfortable for people to bike and walk."

Property owners XPO, Esco and Cairn Pacific own a half-dozen city blocks surrounding NW Thurman and 19th Avenue. They are paying a combined $7.6 million for the street improvements, which give the properties more development potential. They worked with PBOT to form a Local Improvement District to organize the funding needed for the improvements.

PBOT will contribute $1 million in system development charges, which are fees paid by developers to help offset the impact of population growth on the transportation system. The Bureau of Environmental Services will invest about $1 million for sewer construction, which will be coordinated with road construction so the roads don't have to be torn up twice.

Corpac Construction won the contract to build the road improvements. The project will have 82 percent participation of MWESB contracting, more than double the city's goal for contracting with minority-owned, women-owned and emerging small businesses.

PBOT's Local Improvement District program works with property owners of all sizes, all across Portland, to build new roads, streetcar lines, drainage improvements and other transportation infrastructure that improve quality of life, the economy and transportation access.

Street improvements include: 

  • New NW 20th Avenue from NW Raleigh Street to NW Upshur Street;
  • Protected bike lanes on NW 20th Avenue (NW Raleigh St to Upshur St);
  • Protected bike lanes on NW Thurman St (NW 20th Ave to NW 19th Ave);
  • Relocated NW Thurman Street from NW 20th Avenue to NW 21st Avenue;
  • Replacement traffic signal for NW 23rd Avenue & Vaughn St. & U.S. Highway 30 intersection. This will improve traffic flow, and enable TriMet to extend bus Line 24 over the Fremont Bridge in spring 2019, connecting NE Portland to NW Portland and westbound MAX lines.
  • Modifications to NW 23rd Avenue & Vaughn Street intersection at the U.S. 30 off-ramp;
  • Modifications to NW 23rd Avenue between NW Thurman Street and NW Vaughn Street.

Traffic changes and detours, October 2018 through Spring 2019: 

  • U-turn from Westbound U.S. 30/ Fremont Bridge/I-405 to eastbound Vaughn Street connector CLOSED. This is a permanent closure, to be replaced by the new Thurman Street connection. This also will allow "right turn on red" to be established for northbound 23rd Avenue, reducing congestion for vehicles, including buses, accessing the U.S. 30 on-ramp.
  • Travelers westbound on U.S. 30 going to 19th and Vaughn St should go north on NW 23rd Avenue and take Wilson St and Vaughn St to NW 19th Avenue. 
  • Travelers going between NW 23rd and NW 19th Avenues should plan to travel along NW Wilson St or Thurman and NW Raleigh Streets.  

NW 20th Avenue Thurman Street LID Detour Map

The traveling public is advised to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

 

Learn more at the project web site

For more information about the project and plans, or to request a briefing for your community group, contact

Andrew Aebi
Local Improvement District Administrator and Project Manager 

503-823-5648

andrew.aebi@portlandoregon.gov 

The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation is a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides people and businesses access and mobility. 

 

PBOT News Advisory: Crosswalk education and enforcement action planned for NE Sandy Blvd at NE 85th Ave on Wednesday, Oct. 24

(Oct. 17, 2018) – The Portland Bureau of Transportation and Portland Police Bureau will conduct a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action on Wednesday, Oct. 24, at the marked crossing on NE Sandy Boulevard at NE 85th Avenue from noon to 1:30 p.m. to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws. PBOT also reminds Portlanders to use extra caution while traveling on city streets and sidewalks on Halloween.

Vision Zero logoUnder Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk, whether it is marked or unmarked.  People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane.

Children all across Portland will take to the streets to trick-or-treat for Halloween on Wednesday, Oct. 31. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that Halloween is consistently one of the top three days for pedestrian injuries and fatalities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that children are four times more likely to be struck by a motor vehicle on Halloween than any other day of the year. Because excited trick-or-treaters often forget about safety, people driving and parents accompanying children must be even more alert. Everyone should focus on being visible and watching out for other travelers. Add lights and reflectors to your child's costume - it's a fun and easy way to help keep children safe as they trick or treat.

People driving can do their part by driving at or below the posted speed, continuously scanning the environment looking for people walking and bicycling, and being ready to stop as needed. People walking and bicycling are encouraged to be more visible by wearing retro-reflective clothing, using a flashlight or blinking strobe, and investing in bright and contrasting outerwear.  Education and enforcement actions such as the Oct. 24 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to reach its Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Crossing NE Sandy Blvd at 85th

NE Sandy Boulebard at NE 85th Avenue. Image by Google.com

Sandy Boulevard is one of Portland’s 30 designated high crash network streets.  This location has bus stops on both sides of the street and is within close proximity to businesses, restaurants, a senior living facility and The Grotto, a prominent destination for 300,000 visitors annually.

SE/NE Sandy Boulevard had two traffic fatalities (one pedestrian and one person in a motor vehicle), 30 serious injuries and 75 moderate and minor injuries in 2012-16, the latest five-year period for which complete crash data is available.

Since Jan. 1, 2017, there have been four traffic fatalities on SE/NE Sandy Blvd, including three people walking and one person driving.

Education and enforcement actions such as the Oct. 24 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to reach its Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Each crosswalk enforcement action involves a designated person walking at a marked or unmarked crosswalk while police monitor how people driving, bicycling and walking adhere to traffic safety laws. Drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk and pedestrians who fail to follow Oregon traffic laws may be issued a warning or citation.  A PBOT staff member will serve as the designated pedestrian crossing the street during Wednesday’s action.

Crosswalk education and enforcement actions are an effective way to communicate traffic laws to people driving and walking. The transportation and police bureaus do education and enforcement actions in response to requests by community members, city traffic safety engineers, and Portland Police to educate the general public on the rules at marked and unmarked crossings.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for crossing streets in Oregon (in English;Espanol); and view the results of previous actions.

Portland is committed to ending traffic violence in our communities. Through the Vision Zero program, the City of Portland and our partners are working to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our streets by 2025.

For more information about Vision Zero, or to request a community briefing or enforcement action in your area, email VisionZero@portlandoregon.gov or call Matt Ferris-Smith, program specialist, at 503-823-5831.

News Release: Mike Bloomberg names Portland winner in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

Bloomberg Philanthropies logo

(Oct. 17, 2018) Bloomberg Philanthropies today announced Portland as a winning city in the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is a $70 million program that will accelerate 20 ambitious cities’ efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for residents.

Through the Climate Challenge – which is part of Bloomberg’s American Cities Initiative, a suite of more than $200 million in investments to strengthen city halls and advance critical policies – the City of Portland is accepted into a two-year acceleration program, will be provided powerful new resources and access to cutting-edge support to help meet or beat the City’s near-term carbon reduction goals.

American Cities Climate Challenge logoBloomberg Philanthropies selected Portland as a winning city because of its innovative and ambitious climate action plans to reduce air pollution and city-wide emissions with specific projects aimed at reforming their respective transportation and buildings sectors, areas which are typically responsible for 90 percent of all citywide emissions and are areas over which mayors have significant authority. Bloomberg Philanthropies also recognizes Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly for their commitment to ambitious climate action and securing a cleaner, safer, and healthier environment and economy for their citizens.

"Cities are helping to keep America moving forward on climate change despite the lack of leadership from Washington, and this challenge was designed to help innovative cities reach their goals,” said Mike Bloomberg. “We were looking for cities with ambitious and realistic plans to cut emissions in ways that improve people’s lives, and mayors committed to getting the job done. Each of these winning cities brings those ingredients to the table - and we’re looking forward to working with them and seeing what they can accomplish."

“Portland has a long and proud history of leading on environmental initiatives,” Mayor Wheeler said. “We’re excited and honored to be a recipient of the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge grant. With these resources, we’ll be able to develop and implement policies and programs that will keep Portland at the forefront of city leadership on climate issues. Now more than ever, this type of action at the city level is necessary if we are to seriously address the important and pressing issue of climate change.”

“The Portland Bureau of Transportation and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability deserve credit for winning a highly competitive application process to become a Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge Leadership City," Eudaly said. "I am looking forward to working with the Bloomberg team to reduce carbon pollution in our transportation system by managing congestion and making walking, biking, and using public transportation more attractive, safe options. Bloomberg’s support, combined with the City of Portland’s ongoing work and community-based initiatives like the Portland Clean Energy Fund, will enable us invest in innovative strategies that will improve our economy and our health as well as demonstrate how cities can lead the fight against climate change.”

The Portland Bureau of Transportation and the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability are the two agencies that will receive the grant and technical assistance from Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Winners of the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge will be provided robust technical assistance and a support package valued at up to $2.5 million per city. Portland plans to use this support to reduce climate pollution in transportation and promote renewable energy use throughout the city.

Bloomberg Philanthropies will work the City to achieve the following actions by 2020:

  • Manage congestion in the Central City with zero growth in single-occupant vehicle trips, expanding incentives such as the Transportation Wallet, that make it easier for all Portlanders to walk, bike or take public transport instead of drive;
  • Use apps and other new data sources to provide analysis and evaluation of the City's upcoming public transit and bicycle infrastructure investments;
  • Implement performance-based parking pricing and prioritize curb parking spaces to reduce congestion by encouraging higher-occupancy trips, such as public transit and carpools that use ride-sharing services;
  • Ensure City buildings are highly efficient and powered by clean, renewable energy, in order to reach our goal of all facilities being carbon-free by 2030;
  • Support the development of community-owned renewable energy projects like large solar arrays, especially within Portland’s low-income communities and communities of color.

As Climate Challenge winners, the 20 cities will be accepted into a two-year acceleration program with powerful new resources and access to cutting-edge support to help them meet – or beat – their near-term carbon reduction goals. These resources include a philanthropy-funded team member to facilitate the development and passage of high impact policies, training for senior leadership to assist with implementation of their proposed climate plans, and citizen engagement support to maximize community buy-in.

Building on the America’s Pledge initiative, which aims to keep the U.S. in the Paris Agreement, the Climate Challenge underscores Bloomberg’s dedication to action as this investment will translate city commitments into tangible climate achievements. Bloomberg will announce the remaining winners of the Climate Challenge on a rolling basis throughout the fall, highlighting the ongoing, ambitious, and impactful actions cities are taking every day to address the growing threat of climate change.

About Bloomberg Philanthropies

Bloomberg Philanthropies works in 480 cities in more than 120 countries around the world to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Arts, Education, Environment, Government Innovation, and Public Health. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2017, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed $702 million. For more information, please visitwww.bloomberg.org or follow us on FacebookInstagramSnapchat, and Twitter.

About the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

Recognizing that cities account for more than 70% of global carbon emissions, the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge was formed with an investment of $70 million to enhance the work already being done by mayors across the U.S. and to support cities in the fight against climate change. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge aims to go beyond the theoretical and scale up high-impact urban climate solutions that are already proven to succeed - specifically, from the buildings and transportation sectors. World-class partners for the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge will be led by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Delivery Associates. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is part of Mike Bloomberg’s American Cities Initiative, a suite of more than $200 million in investments to strengthen city halls and advance critical policies.

BPS logo

 

### 

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SE Clinton Street will require road closure, from SE 21st Ave to SE 26th Ave, Oct. 16-24

Detours on SE Ivon and Taggart streets for bike and motor vehicle traffic on this busy bicycle corridor

(Oct. 15, 2018) The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements on SE Clinton Street from SE 21st Ave to SE 26th Ave will require the road to be closed to all traffic except buses during work hours, starting Tuesday Oct. 16, for up to seven weekdays.

The street surface will be ground off and repaved with a new layer of asphalt, extending the life of the road by 15 to 20 years.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays during project work hours, normally 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., and expect to follow detour routes. Consider using alternate routes if possible, through Oct. 24.

During work hours, the following detours will direct bicycle and vehicle traffic:

Eastbound travelers will go south at SE 21st, east on SE Taggart St, and north on SE 26th to return to SE Clinton St.
Westbound travelers will go north at SE 26th Ave, west on SE Ivon St, and south on SE 21st Ave to return to SE Clinton St.
For comfort and safety, people riding bicycles are encouraged to use the detour routes at all times, even when work crews are not present. There will be times when the ground street surface is left unattended, and such conditions can be difficult or uncomfortable for people biking.

During work hours, travelers will need to park on side streets and walk to access businesses and other destinations on Clinton Street. Motor vehicles and bicycle traffic will be kept out of the street to ensure safety for crews and the public. Businesses with specific access needs, such as for deliveries, should contact crews on the scene for safe access.

Crews will repave 0.7 lane mile of street surface. Clinton is a neighborhood greenway, a street with low-traffic volumes and speeds, where bicycles, pedestrians and neighbors are given priority.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all traffic control signage and obey directions from flaggers and other work crew members. Use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

###

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SW Vermont Street between SW 55th and SW 45th, October 15-26

Detour map

During street improvements on SW Vermont between October 15-26, eastbound traffic will be detoured up SW Shattuck before returning to SW Vermont via SW 45th Avenue.

FOS

(Oct. 12, 2018) The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements on SW Vermont Street from SW 55th Ave to SW 45th Ave will require lane closures beginning Monday, October 15 through Friday, October 26, during all hours and all days.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave the street as part of the Fixing Our Streets SW Vermont Street paving project.

People traveling east on SW Vermont from SW Oleson Road will be detoured to SW Shattuck Road, then routed to SW Cameron Road from SW Shattuck Rd and then finally routed towards SW 45th Ave down back to SW Vermont, for all hours and all days. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project. Other travel alternatives include SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway and SW Garden Home Road to SW Multnomah Boulevard.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.